STORIFY: 30th homecoming begins #FCgoesHollywood

Storify3Amy Deffenbacher | The Feather Online Archive

With the start of the 30th annual homecoming week, FC is set to host an event each day that all students can participate, Oct. 27-31.

Make sure to check back for updates of the week, as The Feather will be offering a live feed display of #FCgoesHollywood.

With the start of the 30th annual homecoming week, FC is set to host an event each day that all students can participate, Oct. 27-31. Homecoming photos from the week tagged #FCgoesHollywood via Instagram and Twitter will be updated throughout the day.

From ‘Merica Monday, students will dress up in all of their patriotic garb to Think alike Thursday where students will dress up as twins or triplets. The week will end with the homecoming game which starts at 7 p.m., Oct. 31.

Activities from the Monday’s Blood Drive to Thursday’s King Dance will be scheduled throughout the week for students participate in for homecoming class points. The homecoming court will be announced at half time during the game as well.

Students are encouraged to tag their Instagram and Twitter posts and hashtag them #FCgoesHollywood to be included; the installment will collaborate with staffers and students alike.

As students participate in dress-up days, pageants and dances, tagging photos to the official hashtag will be collected through this installment in Storify.

For more on homecoming, read the Oct. 24 article, #FCgoesHollywood: Eagles strut their stuff (VIDEO).

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.

For more news, read the Oct. 27 article, Student Leadership: Homecoming is upon us.

By |2014-10-31T00:00:00-08:00October 31st, 2014|News, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Student Leadership: Practices communication

FCSLogoFC File Photo

The student leadership class continues to focus on qualities of a leader. Communication and commitment are the two qualities they will emphasize in the next week.

The student leadership class continues to focus on qualities of a leader. Communication and commitment are the two qualities they will emphasize in the next week.

In addition to learning public speaking, leadership learned how to introduce a famous people they were not too familiar with. Hannah Nale, ’17, had Marilyn vos Savant as her speaker. Nale says this situation will help her become a better speaker in general.

“In the future this will help me by elaborating quicker,” Nale said. “I’m comfortable with public speaking, but this will help my skills greatly. This prepares me for interviews for jobs and presenting myself and speaking in college.”

The FC volleyball team will be playing at home against Sierra High School, Sept. 9. JV will play at 5 p.m. and Varsity at 6 p.m. Come support our Lady Eagles in the FC gym!

Varsity football will be playing against Anzar High School, Sept. 12 at 7 p.m. After the game will be fifth quarter, location to be announced. Girls tennis will be playing Dos Palos High School at Dos Palos, Sept. 9 at 4 p.m.

The first board meeting for the leadership students will be Sept. 15 at lunch. Leadership advisor Vickey Belmont, plans on increasing responsibility within leadership students and teaching them about their actions and reactions and how they affect other students.

“The responsibilities are to oversee certain aspects of the leadership class, to delegate and see that the follow through is completed.” Belmont said. “We’re going to talk about how this all plays out and then we will explain it to them.”

Homecoming will be held on Oct. 31 and nomination day will be on Oct. 2; students are required to find a location and trailer to build their homecoming floats on. Donations for sites and trailors will be needed as well.

Leadership will be selling Pacifica Pizza on Sept. 19.

For more announcements, read the Sept. 3 article, Student Leadership: Plans a new week

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.Also follow  Leadership via Instagram: @fcleadership_, Twitter: @vbelmont3. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @sbbelmont98.

By |2014-09-09T00:00:00-08:00September 9th, 2014|FC Events, Leadership, News, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Student Leadership: Plans a new week

FCSLogoFC File photo

As the new week starts, student leadership starts to continue working on school activities, including the first school rally for the football and the girl’s tennis teams, Sept. 5.

As the new week starts, student leadership starts to continue working on school activities, including the first school rally for the football and the girl’s tennis teams, Sept. 5. Freshmen class will be burnt orange, Sophomores will be purple, Juniors will be blue, the Seniors will be red.

To earn points for your class wear your class assigned colors and be enthusiastic. In order to earn extra points, students who dress as a Ninja Turtle will gain extra points for their class; at the end of the rally the winning classes reward will be candy bars.

The first home football game is against Coast Union at 7 p.m. Following the football game, will be the first fifth quarter in the Peoples Church gym. Students will have to pay four dollars to get in and eight dollars for parents. Make sure to be in the Nuthouse at any game and wear your spirit wear!

Leadership is selling lunch every other Fri., lunch will be sold, Sept. 5. The next lunch will be sold, Sept. 19.

The leadership class will be talking about commitment and communication, Sept. 8-12.

In addition to the two qualities they are learning, the students will be reading short children’s book to help them with their public speaking. Leadership students will also be working on learning how to introduce a speaker or any special person.

Brooklynn Ainley,’17, a FC leadership student, thinks that learning how to public speak will help her to speak in front of large crowds.

“I think it is a good idea for everyone to learn how to public speak.” Ainley said. “You never know what you’ll do in the future but no matter what you do public speaking will be useful.”

The FC volleyball team will be playing at home against Sierra High School, Sept. 9. JV will begin to play at 5 p.m. and varsity will be playing at 6 p.m. Come support our Lady Eagles in the FC gym.

The high school football team will be playing against Anzar High School at 7 p.m., Sept. 12. After the game will be a fifth quarter, location to be announced. Girls tennis will be playing Dos Palos at Dos Palos at 4 p.m., Sept. 9

Kylie Bell,’16, a girls tennis player, has been playing since she was very little and it had always been a sport she is great in. She played this year so she could build relationships with other girls at FC in addition to it being her second year at school.

“Most of the girls have never played before and I think the team can improve by helping each other learn new skills.” Bell said. “The competition has been tough this year but the team has been doing very well. By the end of the year I would like the team to become more skilled than when they started and I encourage the team to grow together as teammates and friends.”

Also follow  Leadership via Instagram: @fcleadership_, Twitter: @vbelmont3. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @sbbelmont.

For more announcements, read the Aug. 29, Student Leadership: Speaks out.

By |2014-09-03T00:00:00-08:00September 3rd, 2014|FC Events, Leadership, News, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

BRIEF: CSF applications available in the office, due Aug. 26

photo-2 | The Feather Online Archive

California Scholarship Federation(CSF) is a club inviting students with the academic qualifications and desire to serve in their community. Launching into a new year, applications are now available in the high school office and from the CSF advisor, Michelle Warkentin.

CSF offers opportunities for academic success

California Scholarship Federation(CSF) is a club inviting students with the academic qualifications and desire to serve in their community. Launching into a new year, applications are now available in the high school office and from the CSF advisor, Michelle Warkentin.

The club is highly respected and recognized by colleges for its focus on serving others. Warkentin states that CSF is notably beneficial to students who hold a leadership position in the club. Being a life representative will be documented on student’s diplomas and will be recognized.

“Being involved in extracurricular clubs such as CSF are always great things to include on college applications.” Warkentin said. “There are also scholarship opportunities available to CSF students by special nomination their senior year.”

CSF helps you get involved in your community, self discipline, and teaches students commitment.

Being involved in CSF is a way to bond with other classmates and spend time together while accomplishing acts of service.

The club has many future perks like going on a special college trip, as well as present perks like off campus privilege.

“One of the perks of CSF is the privilege of going off campus for lunch twice a month and more access to information about college and scholarship opportunities.” Warkentin said.

All applications are due before Aug. 26 late applications will not be accepted; applications must include student transcripts and be post stamped.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @sbbelmont98.

For more news, read the Aug. 20 article, Students scheduled to show best smile, Aug. 25.

By |2014-08-22T00:00:00-08:00August 22nd, 2014|Announcements, FC Events, News, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Senior congratulates classmates, recollects

Final25BWJeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

Lastly, I want to give a quick shout out and virtual high fives to my classmates. We did it! We are officially 2014 graduates! I pray that even after graduating and leaving this place we call home, each and one of you guys will continue to love Jesus unconditionally and never lose your faith in Him!

“Young man, it’s wonderful to be young! Enjoy every minute of it. Do everything you want to do; take it all in. But remember that you must give an account to God for everything you do.” Ecclesiastes 11:9

I wanted to start off with this verse because it has been a great encouragement to me as I am nearing the end of my high school career.

Stress and worrying can really blind you from the true joy in life, and just like the verse says, these are the times that we should enjoy ourselves the most and look forward to the new journey that God has in stored for us. Change is bound to happen all the time in our lives. Although this is something I fear, I cannot help but be excited to see how God reveals new blessings for me in the future.

If someone were to ask me, “What were some of your greatest memories in high school?” I would give them an answer that might sound very vague; everything. The reason I say this is because FC gave me the opportunities to experience many different parts that high school has to offer. Whether those memories were in academics, participating in school events or getting the chance to be on a varsity basketball team with no experience in the sport what so ever, they all will be cherished forever.

It is such a great feeling to realize that you have people who genuinely care about you and want the best for you. Looking back at my past years at FC, I am starting to realize how blessed I was to have been able to build relationships with influential teachers and friends. They poured out so much into my life and brought out the best in me, allowing me to growing physically and spiritually.

It is truly and honor being able to call myself an Eagle and FC will always have a special place in my heart. I believe that the Lord will continue to work in this school and bring many great things until the day of Christ.

Lastly, I want to give a quick shout out and virtual high fives to my classmates.
We did it! We are officially 2014 graduates! I pray that even after graduating and leaving this place we call home, each and one of you guys will continue to love Jesus unconditionally and never lose your faith in Him!

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @sarahlim77. Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.

For more senior reflections, read the May 23 article, Senior appreciates support, adviser.

By |2014-05-27T00:00:00-08:00May 27th, 2014|Opinions, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Senior reflection: Fries appreciates support, adviser

SeniorTyninCourtesy Tynin Fries

Senior Tynin Fries shares her appreciation for adviser Greg Stobbe in her final Feather article. She will attend Arizona State University in the fall, joining the Barrett Honors College.

After writing 100 plus articles for The Feather, there’s really only a few things left to say. Here’s everything I wished I had said during the last four years to my adviser, Greg Stobbe:

I wish I had known on the first day of school just how much you would teach me about journalism, myself and my future.

Stobbe you were the sole reason for my motivation throughout school. As I lost my favorite teachers and watched them move away, you stayed a constant encouragement. The Feather and your crazy mind kept me from breezing through high school like everyone else.

You pushed me to my limits and made me feel insane. For months I stayed up late, meeting and surpassing your expectations.

Stobbe you’re the most inspirational teacher I’ve ever had, and probably ever will have. You put four years of work into me, and I won’t let you down.

Just like my parents will see their finished product when I move away, so will you. Now that you’ve done your job, it’s time for mine.

These last four years have been grand. We visited New York, Seattle, Disneyland and San Diego. We taught classes, won awards and even met famous people. You gave me more opportunities than an average kid could dream of having.

But rather than the big things, I’ll remember the small lessons you taught me. That when I’m too stressed it’s okay to get wheeled around the room, even if I think there’s no time. New things are scary, but also very cool. And Twitter isn’t just for morons.

This next year will bring be changes for me and you. And I hope that you never lose your inspiration to inspire. There will always be a freshman, eager to learn from you. Don’t give up now because you’ll always be a teacher.

You mean more to me than any other teacher, Stobs. I can’t wait to return in a few years to make you proud of the student and person you helped create.

I love you, Stobbe. Write on!

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @TyninFries. Follow The Feather via Twitter: @thefeather. She will attend the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and Barrett, the Honors College, at Arizona State University.

For more senior reflections, read the May 20 article, Senior overcomes struggles, builds confidence.

By |2014-05-23T00:00:00-08:00May 23rd, 2014|FC Arts, Opinions, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Color guard places second, prepares for competition

ColorGuard1Jason Swain | The Feather Online Archive

Color guard is a team that performs in many different completions involving hand eye coordination and while using flags, sabers and rifles. The schools team is performing to Love Don’t Die for their championships.

In their latest competitions the color guard team earned second place in the Scholastic Regional at Hoover High School. At this event James Logan School took first place, gaining a higher score than that campus squad. Color guard teams can contain both girls and boys in high school and junior high; it serves as a competition team that performs all year round.

Color guard is a team that performs in many different completions involving hand eye coordination and while using flags, sabers and rifles. The schools team is performing to Love Don’t Die for their championships.

14 other color guard teams participated in the competition and will prepare for their next competition at Clovis North, March 29.

Rebekah Carrol, ’19, enjoys acquiring new skills while having a great time. She loves being on the team because it provides her with the opportunity to bond with the other girls and make great memories throughout the year.

“My favorite memory from color guard is when we would sit around and talk,” Carrol said. “Color guard is a great way to get to know each other and we all enjoy getting together to practice. It’s really fun.”

Soloist performer Summer McGrew, ’17, enjoys color guard and cannot wait for championships.

“I like color guard because it gives me something to do, and it’s really fun,” McGrew said. “It involves a lot of energy, too. I like to bond with the girls and we all get to know each other better.”

Many of the girls joined the team in order to try something new and loved the experience as a whole. Color guard is a good balance between hard work and responsibility while making memories. Chloe Cooper, ’17, loves being involved in the team because she can throw the flags and dance to great songs and routines.

“The funniest thing that happened when we were practicing, was when I tossed up a single and a half and I didn’t catch it right and my flag was the only one that dropped,” Cooper said. “Next year I will be doing color guard because I love the coach, the girls and everything about it.”

In addition to competing, the girls also show off their skills at school rallies. Performing at the rallies served as a confidence booster for their upcoming event and they enjoyed performing for the school.

Coach and alumna Megan Stewart, ’11, was involved in color guard for three years during her high school career.

“When I first came only half of them had any kind of training whatsoever,” Stewart said. “Now they all have the basics down on flag and a majority of them have basics down on weapon. It was rather rough to start, getting them into performing mode, but every show their score has increased.”

When the school was looking for a coach, she thought it would be a great way to give back and teach others a sport that she loved. Stewart is very proud of how far the girls have come since the beginning of the year.

“The team has seen noticeable improvement throughout the competitive season,” Stewart said. “They have taken the judges critiques to make changes and championships will be expected to be the best show yet.”

For more news, read the March 25 BRIEF: Cheer tryouts approach, March 29 article.

Freshmen find opportunities to bond, initiate friendships

FreshmanFloatOlivia Quebe | The Feather Online Archive

Freshman year is a time for change; new students have come and other students have gone. In the first year of high school students start to grow up or at least try. They make new friends and lose others. It is almost like a year of wins and losses. Most classes do not bond during their first year of high school, but the class of, ’17, has.

Freshman year is a time for change; new students have come and other students have gone. In the first year of high school students start to grow up or at least try. They make new friends and lose others. It is almost like a year of wins and losses. Most classes do not bond during their first year of high school, but the class of, ’17, has.

Natalia Torres, ’17, thinks the class has bonded very well, and believes the relationships have grown and the students spend a lot more time together. She enjoyed being involved in homecoming and Night of the Stars (NOTS). In the upcoming years Torres is hoping to see better homecoming floats and better NOTS experiences for everyone. Even though junior high is more challenging Torres loves high school.

“Our class has bonded by the extra activities we have had to do for school,” Torres said. “High school is more challenging than junior high. I think our class should work on involving everyone and not being in cliques.”

New student to FC, Daniel Ayres, ’17, thinks that the class has bonded very well since the first day of school. He believes many of the students have grown together in Christ and in friendships.

“In high school you are on a higher maturity level and you get more respect from other people,” Ayres said. “You get to be an upper classmen but not completely so at the same time you’re still a lower class men.”

Looking at the sophomore class, the freshmen see how they bond and have achieved new goals together. Over the year the students have figured out how to act and react to things that they would not have faced in junior high. By this time next year the class hopes to have a better bond then we have now.

Taylor Cowger, ’17, says he likes to be around his friends and build better friendships with them. He hopes to make more friendships and become a better class by senior year. When asked about what the class could do to bond he talked about field trips.

“I would like to see the class bond in a field trip,” Cowger said. “We could go to the zoo or anywhere where the class would have good opportunities to get to know each other.”

Teachers who educate the freshman class and parents have seen the freshman class bond very well. Susan Ainley, drama teacher and parent to Brooklyn Ainley, thinks the freshman class is filled with real friends and great workers.

“I’ve seen other freshman classes sort of wander around all year, not really participating,” Ainley said. “This class had decided to participate. I love seeing how they connect with the upperclassmen. During NOTS they all jumped in and made a movie, got dates and had a blast. I think we will see this class do great things in the years to come and to always be a great group of friends.”

For more features, read the Feb. 27, WSL Talent Show awards top three winners article.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.This writer can be reached via Twitter: @sbbelmont98.

Class of ’15 begins first year of NOTS filming

nots roy2Jason Swain | The Feather Online Archive

This year for Night of the Stars (NOTS), Feb. 15, the freshman are creating reenactments of different commercials. Robert Foshee, adviser the of Student Leadership class, has let the class do commercials because they have never experienced making a movie before.

This year for Night of the Stars (NOTS), Feb. 15, the freshman are creating reenactments of different commercials. Robert Foshee, adviser the of Student Leadership class, has let the class do commercials because they have never experienced making a movie before.

The people in charge of putting all this together are the freshman students in student leadership. Some of the commercials are Squat-o-Matic, Let Jesus Decide and Nature Walk.

Jarrod Markarian, ’17, is a representative of the leadership class for the freshmen and is also one of the students in charge of putting the commercials all together. Markarian is excited to be apart of NOTS this year and to be apart of the filming process.

“The commercials we have already filmed are pretty funny,” Markarian said. “I think the student body will get a good laugh out of all the silly freshman.”

The freshman students have chosen characters, commercials and settings. All the commercials are similar to their originals. All the commercials are a comedy theme. The cast hopes to make everyone laugh and enjoy the production.

Most of the people in the freshman class are excited about NOTS. Since they have never been they do not know what it is like. The rest of the high school student body is helping out with the building of their excitement.

One of the students getting ready for NOTS is Jacob Bynum, ’17, one of the freshmen. Bynum is looking forward to hilarious moments during our filming and watching of the commercials.

“One of the commercials I’d like to do is film a lotion commercial, it’d be really funny,” Bynum said. “I’m looking forward to seeing the rest of the classes movies and watching their expressions when they watch our awesome commercials.”

Many of the commercials are being filmed at the school. Those of the freshman class that decide to show up have gathered every weekend. The class is said to be working well together for this years first NOTS film.
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Filming the commercials has taken about a month. The staff or filming and editing has taken a part of their own time to product this, all students have worked hard and has put in time. The commercials will be fun and exciting to watch the night of.

Natalia Torres, ’17, a freshman student involved in Night of the Stars, is expecting big things out of the freshman. She hopes to see more people at the meeting and participating.

“I’m hoping that the people involved focus on what they are doing and put effort into it,” Torres said. “I’m sure that everything will turn out perfectly and be a great film that we can look back on and laugh.”

Foshee is enthusiastic about this year freshmen NOTS film. His expectations for the freshmen film is not very high because its their first year making a film but he knows they are trying their best.

“The best things about the freshmen film is to see them get started,” Foshee said. “They have fun together and its neat to to see their progression from freshmen to senior and to see their improvement.”

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.This writer can be reached via Twitter: @sbbelmont98.

For more features read the Feb. 6 article, Reeves recollects internment camp experiences.

By |2014-02-06T00:00:00-08:00February 6th, 2014|FC Events, Features, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Rockabilly Mafia Dolls hosts holiday event

RockabillyGuest Photographer

Though this event served the people hot chocolate and holiday cheer, it also served another purpose. Fresno’s very own Rockabilly Mafia Dolls, as a benefit for the Marjaree Mason Center, hosted the Rock-N-Roll Around the Christmas Tree, Dec. 6.

In the darkness of the night, during the bone chilling cold of winter, in a small building concealed in the shadows of the Fresno fairgrounds, a tiny light shown through. Even in the midst of the cold and darkness of this winter night, the light invited all people to come and enjoy themselves among the company of others, in a warm, safe, and fun environment.

As rock songs played in the background of this warehouse setting, one could faintly hear the warm laughter of others, could see the joy in the smiles of the people and a presence of togetherness and unity possessed the dwelling. Everyone, young and old, enjoyed the simple pleasure of roller-skating together on the hard cement floor, and the taste of hot chocolate still fresh on their lips.

Though this event served the people hot chocolate and holiday cheer, it also served another purpose. Fresno’s very own Rockabilly Mafia Dolls, as a benefit for the Marjaree Mason Center, hosted the Rock-N-Roll Around the Christmas Tree, Dec. 6. The Marjaree Mason Center’s goal is to help put an end to domestic violence (violence in the home) and to help provide housing, legal support services and counseling.

Vanessa Garcia, with the Rockabilly Mafia Dolls, helped put on the benefit for the Marjaree Mason Center as a way of saying thank you for their aid to the community.

“The Marjaree Mason Center event holds really near and dear to most of our hearts,” Garcia said. “The Marjaree Mason Center has actually helped some of the women in the Mafia Dolls, so this our way of giving back to them.”

This idea of family fun and togetherness, with the purpose of helping those who cannot help themselves, has the potential of becoming a holiday tradition here in Fresno. Hopefully we will all see the return of the Rockabilly Mafia Dolls and their Rock-N-Roll Christmas next year and for years to come.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @RRoggenstein. Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.

For more news, read the Dec. 18 article, BREAKING: CSPA names Feather Crown Finalist.

By |2013-12-20T00:00:00-08:00December 20th, 2013|News, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Senior reflects on learning experience, journalism

RaynaFeather Staff

To be completely honest, I never thought I would be in journalism. I didn’t have anything against it but it just seemed like a lot of work to pour into something that would not be worth it if I didn’t have a passion for it.

To be completely honest, I never thought I would be in journalism. I didn’t have anything against it but it just seemed like a lot of work to pour into something that would not be worth it if I didn’t have a passion for it. I was asked to join The Feather staff freshman year but it was not until the second quarter of my junior year that I gave it a shot.

The team was looking for another photographer and that position always seemed the most fun and fulfilling to me, so I decided to join. I was shy and timid about taking pictures at first; I didn’t want to appear to be in anyone’s way and when writing captions I always was unsure if what I was saying was adequate enough.

But then I started having fun with it. I realized how much of a perk it is to always have to be in the front of events in order to take pictures. I became much more connected in school activities. I already was very involved in the school but the camera gave me even more events I had to be at.

I learned a lot about what it means to have good communication. With the staff not all having the same journalism period throughout the day it made it very important to learn to work well as a team.

After I was able to pick up the rhythm of being a photographer for The Feather, I no longer saw journalism as a burden. It was something I looked forward to doing. I love taking pictures and being able to share all the memories online for people to see.

This year, my senior year, I was promoted to the position of Photo Editor. I knew I would need to step up and be even more responsible because I was given this title and position of leadership. I have learned a lot about what it means to cover an event well and how to inform readers. I have also learned the importance of social media usage. But I also have learned how to enjoy myself with the jobs I have to do daily.

With the semester coming to a close I am realizing all the things that I will never get to do again after my last semester. I’m learning to take advantage of the opportunities placed in my life and to appreciate the little things.

It’s a crazy thought that I only have five more months of being a student at Fresno Christian, a place that has been my home since kindergarten, but I also know how many exciting things there are to come in my future. I hope to give my fullest efforts during my last semester as a staff member and also remember to be thankful for all that I have learned and for the people that have pushed me to be better.

I have been blessed by my experience and have made some of my fondest high school memories because of my decision to join. I couldn’t be more pleased to be proved wrong.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @raynajenelle. Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.

For more opinions, read the Dec. 13 article, EDITORIAL: Breaking the box.

By |2013-12-17T00:00:00-08:00December 17th, 2013|Opinions, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Sophomore enjoys volunteer tradition with family

Screen Shot 2013-12-17 at 2.41.39 PMGuest Photographer

It wasn’t until recently that I realized what an impact you can make by just ringing a bell. My family and I go down to the Fashion Fair Mall and ring the bell for two hours.

Christmas time is the time where most people give back to the community whether it’s donating to a food drive or giving up your time to help others. Every year around this time my family and I ring the bell for the Salvation Army.

It wasn’t until recently that I realized what an impact you can make by just ringing a bell. My family and I go down to the Fashion Fair Mall and ring the bell for two hours.

When you start to ring the bell most people are just too busy shopping for the holidays to put some change in the kettle. When people do give it’s so encouraging to see someone who doesn’t look like they care, giving out of the kindness of their heart.

My family and I are not there to just wait for people to give, but we are there to smile at people and give some candy canes to people who look like they need it. By doing this it can make someone’s day and show them that God loves them.

I feel like people nowadays think that giving money to charity has to take a huge amount of time and money, but in reality that one penny you give can help change someone’s life. It can make a difference on your day as well.

As the day approached to volunteer again, I came in with a different outlook on volunteering. Everyone struggles with something and it can be so encouraging when someone takes time out of their day to smile at you and look like they care.

I found it my job to encourage everyone and anyone who walked by. If you ever get a chance to ring the bell or donate money to the Salvation Army, do it because it is such a unique opportunity.

For more opinions, read the Dec. 17 article, Senior reflects on learning experience, journalism.

By |2013-12-17T00:00:00-08:00December 17th, 2013|Opinions, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

BRIEF: Feather staff takes vacation, resumes Jan. 6

 In the next few weeks seniors will follow a different schedule than the rest of the school due to their early graduation.The Feather Staff

In the next few weeks seniors will follow a different schedule than the rest of the school due to their early graduation.

After students and teachers completed their last finals, the first semester of the 2013-’14 officially concluded, Dec. 13. The school will now take a three-week Christmas vacation, returning to classes, Jan. 6.

The Feather staff will also break for Christmas and will no longer publish any new material until school resumes again for the spring semester.

Despite the low amount of coverage the staff will cover, a few events will still unfold over the holidays. The winter sporting teams will continue their preseason play throughout the three weeks.

Both the boys and girls soccer teams will travel to compete in the annual Garces Holiday Soccer Festival, Dec. 20-21. Both teams are competing under the Bronze Division against a variety of non-league teams.

The boys basketball team will also compete during the holiday. The Eagles will play in the Dinuba Holiday Tournament, Dec. 18-21.

For other events, check the Daily Announcements.

This author can be reached via Twitter: @TyninFries. Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.

For more news, read the Dec. 12 article, Cindy Lane provides light art, decorations (VIDEO).

By |2013-12-16T00:00:00-08:00December 16th, 2013|News, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

NSPA names The Feather Pacemaker finalist

PacemakerFeather file photo

Over the years, The Feather Online has become one of the leaders of online high school journalism despite only having less that 300 students in the high school.

For the fourth year in a row, the National Scholastic Press Association (NSPA) recognized The Feather Online as a finalist for the organization’s Online Pacemaker award. Each year the NSPA offers its highest honor to online publications and found The Feather Online as one of its 15 finalists, including seven schools from California, March 4, 2009.

With online student publications and media becoming increasingly popular, 70 newspapers from across the country were considered for the recognition, regardless of school size or division. Entries were judged by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Last year there were 50 entries and 35 in 2007.

According to the NSPA Web site, Online Pacemaker finalists are judged on the following criteria: “excellence in content, site design, ease of navigation, writing/editing and multimedia content.” The NSPA has been judging student publications since 1921. A Pacemaker is often referred to as the Pulitzer Prize of high school journalism.

The NSPA will award Online Pacemakers during its spring convention with the Journalism Education Association in Phoenix, AZ, April 18.

“Seeing our website on the list of finalists is one of the most exciting things that can happen to the editors,” senior Chelsea Joy, editor-in-chief, said. “It is such an accomplishment for all involved. Seeing the finalized list of candidates is a dream come true. It’s Feather Pacemaker finalist time.”

Principal Jon Endicott appreciates not only The Feather’s honors, but its relevancy to the student body.

“More importantly than awards, we are proud of how vital The Feather is to our school,” Endicott said. “It serves as an essential communication hub on campus. If students, parents and teachers aren’t going online to The Feather on a daily basis, they are missing what the students are talking about in the hallways and what is important to our school.”

High school online newspapers from across the United States are judged every day during February and March for the right to be a finalist. The Feather editors are Joy, Suzanna Quiring, Austin Ward, Spencer Lee, Brittany Stobbe, Andrew Rurik and Elizabeth Grossman.

The award comes on the heels of another national honor. The Columbia Scholastic Press Association (CSPA) in New York City awarded The Feather Online its Crown award, Feb. 26. The CSPA, sponsored by Columbia University, will bestow a Gold or Silver Crown on The Feather Online during it spring convention, March 20.

Adviser Greg Stobbe is scheduled to be one of the speakers at the event. Palo Alto High School in Palo Alto, CA, is the only other high school to be honored with an Online Pacemaker and Crown designation in 2009 for its online newspaper, The Paly Voice.

New content from The Feather is available through Macintosh widgets, Twitter and Digg. An iPhone application is expected by the end of the school year.

By |2017-09-15T11:09:45-08:00March 6th, 2009|Community Events, News, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Where credit is due

PacemakerWinnersFeather file photo

Editors Mary Kneefel, Andrew Rurik, Jennifer Sherfield and adviser Greg Stobbe pause after The Feather Online won the NSPA Pacemaker in April 2008.

“There’s no ‘I’ in team.”

That old adage is ubiquitous, inescapable in every walk of life. It doesn’t want to go away. Everywhere I turn, there is some situation that the phrase can apply to. As true as this is for sports teams, it is also true for journalism staffs.

I entered into this year way over my head. Mr. (Greg) Stobbe had asked me the year before to be the webmaster to give The Feather Online a simple aesthetic makeover. However, after a few summer meetings, that ‘simple little makeover’ turned into starting from the ground up.

The previous webmaster (Matthew Shattuck, ’07) was truly a master of the web. I, on the other hand, was essentially learning (or re-learning, as I did have some previous experience) as I went. This made for some interesting days and weeks as the designing process of The Feather began.

So about a month passes, and there have been setbacks upon setbacks. We are now into the first part of October, hoping to go live in December, and I am in way over my head. Thus begins the credit giving part: David Martens, the IT director, stepped alongside me and helped me out immensely.

I do not believe that The Feather Online would operate anywhere as close to as smoothly as it does now without Martens’ help. He took the projects that were way out of my knowledge base and broke them down into smaller pieces, giving me projects I could handle and helping me when I got stuck.

However, even more credit remains to be doled out. The Feather staff went down to Anaheim, April 17-19, to win an Online Pacemaker award from the NSPA. That is no small feat. As much praise as we as a staff have received, I would like to distribute a little more.

To all of our editors: You guys are phenomenal. As six of the eight of you graduate, let me just say what an honor and privilege it was to work with you these past two years.

All the writers: You all write a lot more articles than I do, and although the Pacemaker is awarded to the online newspaper, the article content is probably 75% or more of what we won on, so keep up the amazing work.

And finally, to Stobbe: Thank you for pushing me this year, for constantly showing me ways to improve, taking me to what I think is my limit and then showing me that there’s more, for driving me towards excellence in this endeavor and not being short on both constructive criticism or compliments.

There is no ‘I’ in team. Not one person won us our Pacemaker. Thirty-three of us students banded together for the long haul and came out on top as a team. Where credit is due?

And to us our team–we received the credit; we were due.

By |2008-06-03T00:00:00-08:00June 3rd, 2008|FC Arts, Opinions, The Feather, Uncategorized|3 Comments

Gold shocks staff writer

“When I walked down the hall during the beginning of this year, I was nervous because I did not know anyone,” Sydney Ray, ’10, said. “I stepped into the journalism room and wondered what would take place over the next year. Never did I imagine I would be published on national websites.”

Ray joined publications to improve her writing skills and never anticipated her column, Upside to down syndrome, to be placed on PBS’ website or her article, Haircuts enhance style, to be featured on the National Edition. But gold shocks staff writer was a part of a local competition’s talk.

“Journalism is a great way to improve your writing skills,” Ray said, “and that is exactly what I wanted to do. I want to be an attorney, so I will definitely use the skills I am learning in journalism for my career.”

Even though this is Ray’s first year in publications, she participated with the Feather staff at the annual San Joaquin Valley Scholastic Press Association’ s (SJVSPA) journalism convention hosted by California State University, Fresno, March 1. Ray competed in the Rookie Features articles competition and suffered technological difficulties.

“As I was writing my article something happened to my computer,” Ray said. “The article I had originally wrote got erased when the computer froze, even though I saved the file.”

Ray had an hour and a half to write the article, but had to rewrite it in 45 minutes before the award ceremony began.

“When I finished I felt like I did awful because I basically took quotes I used and put transitions in between,” Ray said. “I did not think there was enough substance to the article. I thought there was no way that I would possibly place, so I had my parents pick me up. But when (Greg) Stobbe (adviser) called me to say that I won a gold certificate, I was shocked and thrilled.”

Ray was not alone. Alyssa Boss, ’10, encouraged her to stay and finish the article.

“Even after her article was erased, she was calm,” Boss said, “but once it set in and she realized it was gone, tears started streaming down her face. I encouraged her to stay, because I knew she has a lot of writing skills and she had potential, even if she only had 45 minutes to rewrite it.”

If Ray had not competed, the 2007-08 staff would not have won the Sweepstakes competition. They placed first over Golden West High by one point.

“She (Ray) exhibited dedication, passion and fortitude,” Stobbe said, “and the insignificant can be significant. Our kids do not have to play second fiddle to anybody, because they show these same characteristics. I am so proud of Sydney. I know gold shocked our staff writer.”

The Feather print edition was named San Joaquin Valley Scholastic Press Association’s (SJVSPA) Sweepstakes winner for the first time in campus history. The winners in the past include Golden West, Tokay High, Bear Creek High, Bullard High and Stagg High.

“I’m so thankful that Mr. Stobbe encouraged me to stay in the class,” Ray said, “even when my writing skills were lacking.”

By |2008-03-10T00:00:00-08:00March 10th, 2008|Community Events, Features, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Feather print edition wins SJVSPA Sweepstakes

SweepstakesWinner2008BestSmFC file photo

For the first time in campus history, The Feather is the Sweepstakes winner at the San Joaquin Valley Scholastic Press Association’s (SJVSPA) annual publications competition at Fresno State, March 1.

Campus paper best high school paper from Bakersfield to Lodi

For the first time in campus history, the Feather print edition was named the Sweepstakes winner of the San Joaquin Valley Scholastic Press Association’s (SJVSPA) annual publications competition, March 1, 2008.

“With publications competitions becoming more competitive, it’s hard to imagine a small high school competing against the large school programs,” Greg Stobbe, adviser, said. “But on this day, The Feather staff proved that size does not always matter.”

The Mass Communication and Journalism Departments at California State University, Fresno, annually sponsor the event. The contest consisted of three components: mail-in competition, critique of fall semester’s newspapers and on-the-spot contests.

“I am very excited that we won Sweepstakes; it’s like we were named grand champions,” senior Ryan Martens, Layout and Design editor, said, “but I really was disappointed because we didn’t get All-Valley. Last year we won the award without putting an emphasis on it and so I kind of expected it. But at the same time our December copy did not get proofed and that really worried me.”

Fifteen schools and 145 students participated in the workshops and competition. The Fresno State competition began in 1931 and the previous winners alternated between five other campuses: Golden West High, Tokay High, Bear Creek High, Bullard High and Stagg High.

“It was so gratifying to win the competition,” Alyssa Boss, ’10, said. “It seems for each staff member that Stobbe pushes them harder than everyone else, but we really appreciate him doing so. I entered the features competition and ended up winning third place.”

I can’t even describe how happy I was when Rice announced we won Sweepstakes, especially for the first time in campus history. I’m glad our staff could win it for Stobbe, after all these years. It’s reassuring go into the final portion of the Pacemaker competition, having the hardcopy win, when we spend the majority of our time working on the online edition. — Editor-in-chief Mary Kneefel

Although the staff only received two awards in the first 20 minutes of the presentation, the second half honored nine other reporters. Gary Rice, Executive Director of the SJVSPA and journalism professor, presented senior Mary Kneefel, Editor-in-chief, with the three-foot trophy after he announced The Feather wins SJVSPA Sweepstakes.

“I can’t even describe how happy I was when Rice announced we won Sweepstakes, especially for the first time in campus history,” Kneefel said. “I’m glad our staff could win it for Stobbe, after all these years. It’s reassuring go into the final portion of the Pacemaker competition, having the hardcopy win, when we spend the majority of our time working on the online edition.”

For four of the last five years, the Feather has won the SJVSPA Small Schools Division and named an All-Valley Newspaper. This campus earned the distinction of Sweepstakes winner, while beating all schools, regardless of size or division, between Stockton and Bakersfield.

The staff’s score of 121 narrowly beat out Golden West by one point and last year’s winner, Stagg High, by nine points.

Frustration leads to Sweepstakes win

This campus came closest to a Sweepstakes win in 2000, but fell a few points shy. This year, The Feather was in a similar situation, but experienced the opposite outcome due to sophomore Sydney Ray’s first place rookie feature award.

“While trying to e-mail my paper in for judgment, the computer had a glitch and my saved paper was completely erased,” Ray said. “By this time I was in tears, but the judge offered me a chance to rewrite the article during lunch. At first I refused, but the idea of being a quitter convinced me to go ahead and redo the assignment.”

“I threw together the quotes, transitions and stories from what I could remember in 30 minutes,” Ray said. “Then I went home, feeling as though I had no chance of winning. But, a few hours later I received a call from Stobbe saying that I won first place in the Rookie Features division. Thankfully my friends and Stobbe encouraged me to rewrite it.”

Stobbe believes Ray’s decision to persevere compensated for the past shortcomings to clinch first place overall.

“For me, I am most proud of those students who competed in the on-the-spot contests,” Stobbe said. “It was there that they showed how far they have advanced during the school year. The Feather had 11 individual winners and it was so gratifying to watch them succeed under pressure.”

“I am so proud of the editors of this paper,” Stobbe said. “Mary and Jenn (Sherfield, ’08, Senior editor) work tirelessly to generate ideas, train staff and provide leadership. The 2007-08 staff is the real deal.”

The Feather staff continues to pursue excellence in high school journalism as one of the top 10 finalists for the Pacemaker competition sponsored by the National Scholastic Press Association. The winners will be announced, April 19.

Feather staff wins multiple awards in 2007

staff06FC file photo

The 2006-07 Feather staff met at Piazza del Fiore for the annual yearbook photo, each displaying their favorite hobby.

The 2006-07 Feather staff met at Piazza del Fiore for the annual yearbook photo, each displaying their favorite hobby.

Yet who knew in October 2006 that this staff would win four major awards for The Feather print editions and The Feather Online was nominated for a Pacemaker from the National Scholastic Press Association. The idea that Feather staff wins multiple awards was not on their minds.

Editor-in-chief Mary Kneefel and Layout and Design editor, Ryan Martens, led a nearly all-rookie team to a Silver Medal from New York City’s Columbia University; a First Place with two special merits from the NSPA; and First Place with two special merits from Quill and Scroll International.

The Feather also won All-Valley Newspaper distinction from the San Joaquin Valley Scholastic Press Association sponsored by California State University, Fresno.

Of the 23 staff members on this remarkable team, 19 were rookies including Martens.

For a report on the 2005-06 award-winning Feather staff, read Pacemaker staff 2006.

By |2007-06-11T00:00:00-08:00June 11th, 2007|Community Events, News, The Feather, Uncategorized|2 Comments

Staff enforces NOTS guidelines

A girl walks into the room wearing her hair in beautiful curls and a long sparkling gown. She appears as a vision of loveliness, but because she wears brown flip-flops she is immediately sent out of the theater.

Students must consider the guidelines before buying that dress or renting a tux, with Night of the Stars scheduled for Jan. 20. Anyone arriving out of dress code will be asked to leave.

According to Molly Sargent, women’s counselor, these are the top two guidelines most likely to be broken.

For the girls…

-Appropriate formal footwear or dress shoes are required; beach-type flip- flops are NOT allowed.

-Dresses that are see-through or have an exposed midriff, or too low in the front are NOT permitted; chiffon or similar fabric jackets or wraps are acceptable.

For the boys…

– Appropriate formal wear must be worn including proper footwear

-Facial hair is NOT allowed.

For a more detailed description of the dress code click here Fresno Christian announcements and scroll to FCHS Night of the Stars Dress Code Policy.

In addition to the dress code, there are also some guidelines to follow if a student wants to bring a date from another campus. The guest must make an interview with Jon Endicott, associate principal, for authorization to attend.

“It is important that I have a talk with the non-Fresno Christian student to get to know them and let them know how important our event is,” Endicott said. “We want to make sure they have appropriate behavior so the focus does not end up on them.”

Some students agree with the purpose of the rules.

“The dress code rules for N.O.T.S are extremely fair,” Kara Linkowski, ’08, said. “Even though it is hard to find a modest dress, the rules are flexible and easy to abide by. Our dress code is not much different than the public schools, so students should be grateful.”

Night of the Stars is at the Wilson’s Theater, located downtown at 1400 Fulton. Pictures start at 5:15 P.M. and dinner begins starts at 6 P.M. Tickets will be sold for $60 until Jan. 19.

For more information on the movies, check out Benjamin Dang’s Jan. 18, 2007, article, Deadlines challenge directors. For NOTS history check out Kelly Gong’s Jan. 19, 2007, article, Suggestion creates tradition.

 

By |2007-01-17T00:00:00-08:00January 17th, 2007|News, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

2005-06 Pacemaker staff wins NSPA Pacemaker

staff_05_06Molly Sargent

For the first time in school history, The Feather won a national award, earning a National Scholastic Press Association (NSPA) Pacemaker award in April 2006.

For the first time in school history, The Feather was nominated for a Pacemaker from the National Scholastic Press Association. The NSPA honored the 2005-06 staff with its highest award in April 2006.

An online Pacemaker designates a high school newspaper as one of the top three in the United States. This is the high school equivalent of a Pulitzer Prize.

Since 1927, the NSPA has been partnering with high schools to improve their staffs, advisers and publications. According to their website, the NSPA “provides journalism education services to students, teachers, media advisers and others throughout the United States and in other countries.”

Online editor-in-chief, Brianna Stobbe, left front, hard copy editor-in-chief Gary Darakjian and webmaster Matthew Shattuck took adviser Greg Stobbe’s challenge to be one of the best high school newspapers in the country seriously and the 2005-06 Pacemaker staff wins NSPA Pacemaker.

Additionally, Stobbe and Darakjian led the print edition staff to a Gold Medal from New York City’s Columbia University; a First Place with two special merits from the NSPA; and First Place with two special merits from Quill and Scroll International. The Feather also won an All-Valley Newspaper distinction from the San Joaquin Valley Scholastic Press Association sponsored by California State University, Fresno, earning a Superior ranking.

The staff of 2006-07 commends their effort and plans on continuing the commitment to excellence. For more information on this prestigious award, click on Julianne Erkenbrecher’s April 27, 2006, article, NSPA names Feather a Pacemaker.

For more information on the NSPA, go to their website at National Scholastic Press Association.

By |2006-11-22T00:00:00-08:00November 22nd, 2006|Community Events, Photos, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Editors honored with SJVSPA All Valley honor

sm-EditorsHonoredBrittany Stobbe

After months of editing and dedication to the campus newspaper, The Feather, senior hard copy editor-in-chief, Gary Darakjian, center, and senior online editor-in-chief, Brianna Stobbe, right, received first place in the Small Schools Division at the SJVSPA competition at Fresno State, March 4.

In now its 60th year, the San Joaquin Valley Scholastic Press Association (SJVSPA) invites junior and senior high media and communication students from Lodi to Bakersfield to compete in its annual competition sponsored by the School of Mass Media and Journalism at Fresno State University, March 4, 2006.

After months of editing and dedication to the campus newspaper, The Feather, senior hard copy editor-in-chief, Gary Darakjian, center, and senior online editor-in-chief, Brianna Stobbe, right, received first place and a SJVSPA All Valley honor newspaper award in the Small Schools Division at the SJVSPA competition at FSU on March 4.

This is the second year in a row The Feather was awarded this honor. Additionally the online version of the paper is currently being judged by the National Scholastic Press Association in its two-month competition. Results of this contest will be made available in April.

Darakjian, who has been on staff for three years, also received first place in the on-the-spot lay-out and design competition. The on-the-spot competitions were open to students from all divisions. Other onsite winners were seniors Kassy Batesole and editor Spenser Koleen. Both writers received honorable mention in on-the-spot contests: Batesole for a sports article and Koleen for an editorial.

Juniors triumph in powderpuff

PowderpuffjumpballJeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

After a year off the field, the junior girls returned to claim the annual powder puff football tournament trophy for the second year in a row on Nov. 18.

After a year off the field, the junior girls returned to claim the annual powderpuff football tournament trophy for the second year in a row on Nov. 18.

“I thought the juniors strong team was going to win,” Micaelah Aleman, ’08, said. “The juniors played an excellent game and finished strong.”

Despite the brutality of the senior class performance and the unknown strength of the freshmen, the juniors prevailed and won the overall competition.

“This year the juniors knew they had a good chance at winning,” Eliza Leisle, ’07, said. “The only doubt I had was we did not know what the freshman were capable of. The team had athletic players and many of them play sports.”

Powder puff is a favorite tradition for many on campus as it provides the girls with a chance to compete in a sport typically reserved for boys.

“Having powder puff gives girls an opportunity to play football,” Josh Tosland, leadership adviser, said. “Some girls do not have the chance to play football for fun or P.E. because of schedules so powder puff is their time to play.”

In keeping with tradition the seniors started the games against the freshmen while the juniors took on the sophomores.

“I think that the sophomores had a chance at winning,” Claire Kister, ’08, said. “We had some trouble with the juniors because they are strong. Plus they won last year and they had the same players again this year.”

The reverse in gender roles added to the excitement of powder puff.

“This is my first year playing powder puff,” Molly Griffin, ’09, said. “Having this event shows that we are just as good as the boys.”

While the girls battled on the field, the boys fought for control over the sidelines as cheerleaders.

“You often do not see girls playing football, but then you see how good and athletic some of the girls can be,” Miller said. “Also the guys cheerleading was awesome because I was a flyer.”

For more information about powder puff, contact Tosland at jtosland@fresnochristian.com or call the high school office at 299-1695, ext. 152.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.

By |2005-11-28T00:00:00-08:00November 28th, 2005|News, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Journalistic effort produces award-winning paper

Hours of heated discussions and meetings finally produced what appears today, a well-oiled machine. It was in those energized conversations that the The Feather evolved.

That was 25-years-ago. Today, The Feather publishes new information every day in an online edition and a monthly hardcopy paper.

“It didn’t come easily,” Tim Wilkins, superintendent, said. “We had to develop our own [online edition]. That was before Mr. [David] Martens was here.”

After years of work, Principal Gary Schultz believes the paper has taken huge leaps towards excellence.

“There’s no comparison in terms of quality,” Schultz said. “It used to be printed just to be seen in the school and we weren’t online. The paper used to be just a little bit of news about the school.”

Wilkins professes that the newspaper becomes an archive of the school’s history.

“My view is that the hardcopy of the high school newspaper should be archival in its news,” Wilkins said. “That’s very important in high school.”

Greg Stobbe, current Feather adviser, has been aiding in the production of campus newspapers since 1995.

“Mrs. [Molly] Sargent was pulling out her hair doing the yearbook and the newspaper,” Stobbe said. “I was teaching six straight English classes and was going to quit if I didn’t get a break.”

A journalism major in college, Sargent, yearbook adviser and previous Feather adviser, had a rocky start.

“The staff at that time [1992-4] were almost all seniors and they were loyal to the adviser that had left,” Sargent said. “I taught the paper different so there was resentment to start off with. I went over previous years’ newspapers and how to improve it. They took it as criticism, but it got better.”

Anyone who has ever tackled a large project can attest to the challenges that it brings.

“I had only taken one journalism class in college,” Stobbe said. “I was fortunate to have a kid [Ricky Barrett, grad of 1996] that had done computer work before, so it was me and him against the world.”

The years that Sargent ran the show, junior high also worked on the paper.

“Because junior highers were in the class, there was constant division,” Sargent said. “The high schoolers resented when I asked them to help the junior highers, which is understandable. The only real difficult part was teaching both levels and getting them to cooperate.”

Along with the pressure to excel, pandemonium is inevitable.

“If a person were to walk into the journalism room, they might think the class is chaotic,” Stobbe said. “The fact is, it is chaos. I am made for chaos. The class is a whirlwind of activity. I need a certain amount of chaos to work. Music, talking, writing stories or whatever adds to the creative process and produce an award-winning paper.”

But, even before Sargent and Stobbe, there was Mrs. Joan Johnson.

“It wasn’t even a newspaper,” Johnson professes. “Occasionally a flyer was produced.”

Even though online editions are becoming common, Johnson still prefers the hardcopies.

“I don’t like the online papers,” Johnson said. “I like to hold a paper in my hands and read it.”

Johnson managed the paper for about seven years, winning the All-Valley award [sponsored by California State University, Fresno] several times.

“I had a yearbook class, then in March when yearbook finished, at that point I started it,” Johnson said. “I did it hand-in-hand with yearbook. Eventually it became a separate class.”

Johnson believes the paper should cover campus related materials only.

“The paper should feature students,” Johnson said. “It should provide coverage for all the activities. It should reflect the news of the campus and issues that it is dealing with.”

Schultz thinks that the paper should showcase the school.

“The newspaper is a public relations and learning tool,” Schultz said. “Today, it’s what alumni look at. Thousands see the staff [writers] work. I expect the newspaper to only print ‘A’ work.”

Part of the journalism program is to assist potential journalists in making them skilled writers.

“My combined expectations are to provide valuable service for our school,” Wilkins said. “But, more importantly, to develop young, budding, potential journalists that would make a difference in the world.”

Teamwork and cooperation combine to create the paper.

“The students in this class have to take responsibility for creating a product that is worthy of printing,” Stobbe said. “They aren’t only responsible to me, they are responsible to each other and that’s what makes a good paper. They expect excellence from each other which in turn drives them to create a solid publication.”

Today, The Feather continues to win numerous awards sponsored by Columbia University, California State University, Fresno and the National Scholastic Press Association.

For more information contact Stobbe at gstobbe@fresnochristian.com or at 299-1695, ext. 5. To view the online paper and the archives, go to www.thefeather.com.

By |2004-12-02T00:00:00-08:00December 2nd, 2004|Academics, News, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Class of 2004 primed for San Francisco

Senior year is anticipated by many, often because of the coveted senior privileges: senior retreat, off campus lunch, senior bathrooms. However, all these traditions pale in comparison to the up-coming senior trip, set for May 12-16.

San Francisco will be invaded by the class of 2004 as they adventure out from the comfort of campus life and into an experience unlike any other.

“I can’t wait for senior trip,” Seth Fisher, ’04, said. “The legends of trips past and stories from alumni have hyped it up so much; it’s going to be a blast!”

Most seniors share Fisher’s enthusiasm. Yet, some view it as just another school function.

“After the Hawaii trip, I expect the senior trip to be pretty boring and tightly chaperoned,” Derrick Lehman, ’04, said. “I’ll still try to make the best out of it, but I’m expecting to have a bad time.”

Many hours of hard work and preparation have preceded the trip in hopes that it will be enjoyable for all seniors.

“The senior class sponsors have been meeting regularly since November,” Scott Falk, campus pastor and co-planner, said. “We believe the trip will be an unforgettable experience for seniors; we’re really looking forward to returning to the Bay Area.”

Students will visit many attractions including a trip to the Orpheum Theater for a showing of the Lion King featuring the traveling Broadway cast, a Giants baseball game, a day at Santa Cruz Boardwalk and a service project at Mt. Hermon.

“I’m really excited that we get to go to Santa Cruz since Sadies got cancelled,” Michelle Nachtigall, ’04, said. “I can’t wait to hang out with everyone. I think this will be a great way to end the year.”

Whether students are excited or apathetic, senior trip has often created memories of all shapes and sizes and plays an imperative role in campus tradition. The class of 2004 primed for San Francisco and beyond.

By |2004-04-15T00:00:00-08:00April 15th, 2004|News, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Fresno State to host journalism conference

The clatter of fingers furiously flying across keyboards reverberates around the room as students from over 100 schools throughout the Central Valley prepare to compete in the annual Muckraker High School Journalism Conference held on March 6 at Fresno State.

The competition is sponsored by the Mass Communication and Journalism department at Fresno State and by the San Joaquin Valley Scholastic Press Association (SJVPA). During the day, the Feather staff will compete for individual and team awards.

“I think the conference is valuable because it encourages young journalists,” Gary Rice, conference director, said. “The more you write the better you become. In my 21 years in journalism and 10 or 11 years of teaching, I have found that people who write well tend to be better thinkers, and that is really the main goal.”

Students will attend seminars and compete in various events from 8:15 A.M. – 12 P.M. Students can compete in news writing, editorial writing, feature writing, advertising design, yearbook design, sports writing, newspaper design and news photography.

“Competing gives our staff as student writers an unique opportunity to test our abilities under pressure,” senior Eric Witters, ’04, associate editor, said. “While we have not had much success in the past, our staff has used this competition to improve and excel every year.”

Students who do not compete will attend various seminars. Seminars will include information about lead writing, interviewing, sports writing, music and movie review, feature writing and photography.

“This is my first year in journalism,”” Kira Armbruster, ’06, staff writer, said. “I am looking forward to learning new information in the seminars.”

Journalism adviser Greg Stobbe sees the conference as a way to help students advance their skills.

“”When my staff attends seminars and are able to watch staff writers from other high schools compete, it affords them valuable insights and perspectives on writing,” Stobbe said. “I hope we are able to improve our word usage, phrases and abilities in all facets of journalistic reporting.”

After an hour-long break for lunch, students will attend an awards ceremony from 1-2 P.M.

For additional information, contact SJVSPA conference director Gary Rice at (559) 278-2026 or go online at www.fresnostatenews.com.

Skills, fear drive annual powder puff classic

Amidst all the pulling of hair and wrestling for the ball, the girls have only one thing in mind: to win at all costs. Powder puff is the annual royal rumble in which the female students on campus contend for bragging rights in the form of a flag football tournament on Nov. 26 from noon to 3 P.M.

“I’m looking forward powder puff,” Michelle Nachtigall, ’04, said. “I can’t wait to fight for the trophy and give everything I have to win.”

Many upper class men are looking forward to this years’ event as an opportunity to claim victory after being dominated by the class of 2003.

“I am really excited to play this year, and since I’m a senior this year it makes it even more fun,” Tara Thompson, ’04 said. “Although I love the freshman, it is part of tradition to push them around a little during the game.”

Though many female upper classmen anticipate playing in the event, some new powder puff faces may feel unsure as to what to expect.

“I’m a little scared to play,” Ashley Davis, ’07, said. “We haven’t practiced at all, and I’m worried that the seniors will kill us.”

Girls are not the only students involved. Guys are needed to fill the role as coach and help their classmates clench the trophy.

“I enjoy coaching because I get to have some control over girls,” Jeremy Ramos, ’07, said. “I hope my experience as a football player will help them.”

Many other students enjoy watching the games for entertainment purposes.

“I love watching powder puff,” Tyler Wiebe, ’04, said. “It is always good to see girls duke it out and not care who’s watching.”

More than playing the actual game goes into making powder puff successful. The class t-shirts help unify the teams.

“The shirts are an important part in the spirit of powder puff because it gives the teams a sense of unity,” Tara Albrechtson, ’06, said. “I hope this years shirts are unique and interesting.”

For more information on powder puff parents and students can contact the high school office at 299-1695, ext. 5.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.

By |2003-12-01T00:00:00-08:00December 1st, 2003|News, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Scholastic press associations honor, critique newspaper

At the end of each school year, adviser Greg Stobbe sends in The Feather so scholastic press associations critique and judge the campus paper. The Quill and Scroll International Honorary Society awarded the International First Place plaque to The Feather staff during October. The honor was for the for the 2002-2003 school year.

“The satisfying part of advising staff writers is training students who really want to learn how to advance their skills,” Greg Stobbe, Feather adviser, said. “Winning awards is just a natural outcome for their hard work. It’s fun to sit back and watch them succeed.”

Quill and Scroll was organized to provide encouragement and recognize individual student achievement in journalism as well as other scholastic publications. Their magazine carries up-to-date and authoritative information about careers in journalism and developments in the field or journalism teaching.

The Society also provides publication critiques for schools that have a Quill and Scroll charter. To be eligible for a charter, high schools must publish a magazine, newspaper, yearbook, literary magazine, broadcast program or a web site.

Quill and Scroll judges comment about strengths and weaknesses of a newspaper and make suggestions for a better publication. Campus journalism has been a member of Quill and Scroll since 1991.

“For a small Christian paper, The Feather staff does an exceptional job, especially on such a small budget,” an anonymous Quill and Scroll judge said. “I particularly applaud the staff’s desire for an internet paper- in keeping with the Information Age. Congratulations to a dedicated staff and adviser.”

Judges for the Columbia Scholastic Press Association also critiqued The Feather in October, pointing out different problems and areas for improvement throughout the paper.

“Your publication’s strengths lie in the tight, clean, visually pleasing layout design and in your good tonal range in you photos,” an anonymous CSPA judge said. “One major problem, [alluded to throughout the critique], is the tendency to editorialize–allow the writer’s opinion to come through in the quotations. It is easy to allow editorializing to happen, and it takes diligent editing to remove it from the text.

“Both news and feature articles would be improved by the addition of sidebars- graphs, surveys, related articles, checklists, charts, diagrams, ect. For every article, there should be an illustration- not necessarily a photo or drawing, but some visual component to clarify information and draw the reader into the story. Think about what you look at first in a newspaper- photos, headlines, sidebars, graphics. These guide your reading.”

The CSPA gave the journalism staff a silver medal to their collection of awards. Eight members of The Feather staff also traveled to New York during March to attend classes at Columbia University during the CSPA conference. See the May 2003 online article “Journalism trip to NYC highlights year” by Tim Gomez in the archives for more information on the conference.

Along with winning various awards, nine individual articles by seven staff writers have been recognized by the American Society of Newspaper Editors [ASNE] on the National Edition online paper in the past six weeks.

The National Edition online paper is a collection of stories from across the country. Stories are chosen based on quality and the appeal to a broad teen readership. The editors look for work that adheres to sound journalistic practices. The online edition can be found at www.myhighschooljournalism.org/nationaledition.

Anne Hierholzer, ’05, was chosen to be on the National Edition for her article written with Sarah Parker, “Passion, enthusiasm highlights grocery trip.”

“It’s an honor to be chosen for the National Edition,” Hierholzer said. “It’s nice to be able to go online and read other articles and to see what other schools are doing.”

To learn more about the Quill and Scroll Honorary Society go to www.uiowa.edu/

By |2003-11-04T00:00:00-08:00November 4th, 2003|Academics, Community Events, News, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Journalism plans to attend local SJVSPA Muckracker competition

Feather staff will compete at Fresno State’s SJVSPA annual competition

Aspiring journalists will expand their media skills at the annual “Muckracker 2003” on March 8. Hosted by San Joaquin Valley Scholastic Press Association (SJVSPA) and sponsored by the Mass Communication and Journalism department of Fresno State, the conference welcomes over 100 schools throughout the Central Valley.

“Our conference gives students a chance to see how their work stacks up against others from their geographical area,” Greg Lewis, professor in the Mass Communications department, said. “Students can learn from the experience. We send the articles from the on-the-spot competition back to their teachers for future reference.”

The event takes place from 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. at various places on the campus and competitors walk to their respective event buildings. Categories include yearbook, newspaper and advertising design, photography, news, feature, sports and editorial writing. Competing schools select two students to participate in each event and four awards are given in each category.

“I was delighted at receiving honorable mention last year,” Anne Hierholzer, 05, said. “I learned a lot from the competition last year and I hope to capitalize on the experience I gained.”

However, some students do not compete but they can attend workshops for instruction in specialized areas.

“Last year I did not compete and I was disturbed,” Randy Hill, ’04, said. “I had to attend a photography workshop but this year I will definitely compete and win the SJVSPA Muckracker competition.”

Fresno State has opened its doors to students for 23 years and this will be FC’s fifth year competing. Last year, FC took home the All-Valley newspaper award for small schools with under 1,600 students. The contests begin at 8:45 a.m. but registration for all participants opens at 8:15.

For additional information, contact SJVSPA director Becky Thornton at (559) 278-6266.

By |2003-02-27T00:00:00-08:00February 27th, 2003|Academics, Community Events, News, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

FSU awards Feather All Valley SJVSPA newspaper

Student journalists from all over California’s Central Valley converged on the campus of Fresno State University on March 9 to celebrate their year. Among the day’s winners was the campus newspaper staff, as The Feather not only received a Superior rating, but also was named the All Valley Newspaper of the Year for small schools.

The occasion, “Muckraker 2002,” is an annual event hosted by the San Joaquin Valley Press Association (SJVSPA) and sponsored by the Mass Communication and Journalism department of Fresno State. Over 100 schools from Lodi to Bakersfield competed in the competition. Besides giving out awards to newspapers, yearbooks and individual articles were also judged by Fresno State department heads.

The half-day festivities included a variety of workshops designed to improve student journalists’ writing, editing and layout styles.

Classes available to attendees included “Grammar Gremlins,” a class demonstrating the common mistakes editors and writers often make; news photography; newspaper design; and movie reviewing, taught by Fresno Bee writer Donald Munro.

Some student journalists also chose to compete in on-the-spot contests. Participants were given a set amount of information and instructed to write a features piece, news or sports article, or an editorial.

“I learned how to write under pressure,” Melissa Morris, ’03, said. “Having a short amount of time to write an article is going to help me write my normal articles even better.”

For some, however, finicky computers stalled their competition dreams.

“The competition would have been a much better experience if my computer had not crashed while I was halfway through my article,” Ashley Cook, ’02, said. “I am looking forward to going back next year and trying to place.”

Editors and graphic designers were given specifics for a page or advertisement and told to design the page.

“The design competition was fun,” Bradley Hart, ’03, editor-in-chief, said. “It was great to finally meet the other editors from around the Valley and observe their style. It was fun to see and experience the passion of journalism and win an All Valley SJVSPA newspaper.”

Following the classes and contests, participants filled the Fresno State University Center auditorium. Following several inspirational speeches by local journalists and professors, awards were distributed to the editors, writers and yearbook staff members judged to be generating the top publications in the area.

After the dust settled, The Feather staff not only received an All Valley distinction but several other writing and photography awards.

Carli Albrechtson, ’02, was awarded second place in the photography competition. Judges commented during the awards ceremony that her photograph of an elderly man and a newborn colt was one of the best ever in SJVSPA conference history.

“The competition was a good experience because it provided for a hands on experience,” Albrechtson said. “It was great to apply what I have already learned and get a taste for what a career in photography might be like.”

The other individual award winner was Holly Deniston, ’04, whose article on depression placed third overall in the features writing category. The article can be read online in the archive section of this paper.

Honorable mention went to Annie Hierholzer, ’05, for a sports article and Eric Witters, ’04, for a news article.

However, The Feather did not receive as many awards as in past years, when the publication was well-known as one of the best in the area. In the 2000 Sweepstakes competition, The Feather placed second overall in the entire San Joaquin Valley.

For some senior staff, the lack of individual awards received was disappointing.
“I was shocked that we won the All Valley award without winning more individual awards,” Hart said. “When we were evaluated by judges before the competition, they said that writing was our paper’s strongest point. Obviously, it wasn’t strong enough though.”

The Tokay Press from Lodi won the Sweepstakes competition after nearly sweeping the writing and photography awards.

“I was disappointed by how few awards we won,” Greg Stobbe, Feather adviser said. “Last time we competed, we came within 50 points of winning outright. But I know this competition will help focus our young staff. The teaching and experience our writers and layout editors received was invaluable.”

While the staff was disappointed in the final outcomes, many viewed the experience as a stepping-stone to better their writing.

“I learned that if you don’t love writing then you will not be a good journalist,” Katy Haskins, ’03, said. “You really have to love the job to succeed in it.”

The campus yearbook, The Shield, was also awarded Superior status from the SJVSPA but did not garner any other awards.

Feather back online after Highwired.com’s demise

Students pound their mouses into their mouse pads as they hopelessly search for the location of the school’s newspaper website. Little do they know that behind the scenes, the journalism staff, along with technology director, Dave Martens, have worked tirelessly to produce a better website. The Feather back online is the staff’goal and its at www.thefeather.com.

“I like the new website because we have an easy URL,” David Pohl, ’03, staff writer, said. “I hated typing all those stupid backslashes and meaningless letters.”

Highwired.com, The Feather’s old Internet provider folded due to lack of funds and journalism was forced to produce a website from scratch.

“When Highwired went down in August, I at first was depressed thinking that a new website would be almost impossible,” journalism adviser Greg Stobbe said. “However, despite this great loss, we had the opportunity to create something better. Mr. (David) Martens and I sat down with superintendent (Tim) Wilkins and we hammered out the general concept that turned into what you see today.”

Highwired gave space to high schools to show their newspaper, classrooms, and sports. It also housed The Feather for three years and still holds its archives under the name www.highschooljournalism.org. This site also displays 350 newspapers including a link to The Feather. With Highwired’s demise, the American Society of Newspaper Editors has also taken over the rights of Higwired to follow suit and display high school newspapers at www.asne.com.

“This new website has jubilated me beyond perceivable limits, and I find myself to be the quintessence of excitement,” Brad Hart, ’03, editor-in-chief, said. “Every time I type a letter, my finger tips tingle knowing it will appear on our new website. I feel as if rays of sunshine burst from my soul positively affecting students around me. I have poured my blood and sweat into this paper and finally it is going somewhere.”

For more information on The Feather, please go to www.theFeather.com and e-mail the staff or use www.FresnoChristian.com. Students may also call the high school office at 297-9464 and leave a message on adviser Stobbe’s answering service at 297-9464, ext. 151.