Student of the Month: Mariana Fikse

IMG_2320Alexis Kalugin | The Feather Online Archive

While freshman Mariana Fikse enjoys horseback riding, she is also playing varsity tennis and basketball.

Every month The Feather will highlight one student recommended by a teacher and voted upon by Feather staff members. Students are chosen depending upon several factors including and not limited to good grades, class engagement, positive attitude and special extracurricular activities.

Due to the Feather’s upgrade period during the end of March and April both a Male and Female student have been selected for the month of May.

May’s female student of the Month is Mariana Fikse, ’16, chosen by mathematics teacher, Jared Kaiser for her focus and curiosity in the materials.

“Mariana is a student who knows what it means to be an Eagle,” Kaiser said. “She is always willing to help her fellow classmates and is always on task wanting to learn more.”

Fikse first joined the FC community at the start of the 2014-15 school year after attending Cross Road Christian in Madera throughout elementary and junior high. Since her arrival, Fiske has kept exemplary grades as well as joined both the varsity basketball and tennis team.

“Mariana is a student who knows what it means to be an Eagle. She is always willing to help her fellow classmates and is always on task wanting to learn more.” –Jared Kaiser, mathematics teacher

Sports and athleticism comes naturally to Fikse who spends much of her free time outdoors or riding quads at the track behind her family’s dairy (located in Madera). As a first-year tennis player, Fikse says that she originally joined tennis for the team aspect however soon began to enjoy the sport as well.

“It’s a fun sport that you can play with almost anyone,” Fikse said. “There isn’t so much pressure because it is an individual sport so you learn at your own pace.  I first tried tennis because I didn’t know anyone at the school and I thought it would be a good way to get to know some people. But as the season went on I began to really enjoy tennis.”

She first started basketball at Crossroads in the 5th grade and has continued to build and hone in her skills since, as a freshmen on FC’s varsity level.

Team mate Olivia Tandadjaja, ’16, says that Fikse served as a vital member of this year’s girl’s basketball program as well as being a supportive teammate and friend.

“Mariana has such a positive attitude and always gives her all,” Tandadjaja said. “She definitely makes the most baskets in our team from her three-point-shots. She is also really funny and great to be around.”
Fiske hopes to help strengthen the girl’s program throughout the next three years and develop close bonds with her team mates.

“My favorite part is just being on a team and having fun and getting to learn the sport better,” Fikse said. “My hopes for next season are that we win more games and make it to the playoffs. I think next year we will be good enough to compete with a lot of teams.”

When not outdoors or practicing for tennis or basketball Fikse often plays the piano which she learned as a 1st grader. She still continues to take regular lesson and performs at recitals an average of twice a year.
Fikse has attended Cornerstone Community church is Chowchilla throughout her life and plans to become involved with the youth group over the summer.

Fikse wants to discover her future career by taking the classes that interest her. Though she is not yet certain about the exact path, Fikse considers a career in agriculture due to the significant role the family farm played in her childhood. Fikse accredits farming with her strong work ethic and with the appreciation of values and integrity.

“In the summer I work in our office and sometimes I will help my Dad with vet checks on Wednesday,” Fikse said. “It (farming) definitely makes you appreciate hard work and not take things for granted. I definitely would want to stay in agriculture. It’s like my life, I love it and I have never known anything different I guess.”

Friend Jenna Bynum says that Fikse is generally quiet but extremely caring and loyal.

“She’s quiet, funny, nice and caring,” Bynum said. “She’s just an overall awesome friend.”

Mother, Marie Fikse describes her daughter as focused and compassionate. Both parents want Mariana to stay strong in her faith and continue to pursue her interests and dreams.

“Mariana is a sincere and kind person,” Marie said. “She cares about others and has a sweet personality. She is humble and honest and works hard at whatever she does. She is a self-motivated person, she wants to do things right. She works hard and doesn’t give up easily. I see leadership qualities in her and a lot of perseverance. We pray that she will continue to grow in The Lord and seek Him first and His will for her life. Mariana brings joy and fun to our family everyday and we are proud of her and love her.”

Interesting facts about Mariana Fikse

• If Fiske was an animal she would be a bird so that she could fly.
• Her favorite food is Pizza
• If Fikse could have any superpower it would be super speed.
• Her favorite restaurant would either by California Pizza Kitchen or In n Out.
• She listens to Christian and Country music.
• She has four Labrador retrievers.
• When Fikse was in elementary school she read and re-read the Narnia Series multiple times.
• Her favorite subject is history because she likes to learn about how the modern connects with the past.

For last month’s Student of The Month, view Student of the Month: Roman Endicott.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @skylerklee.

By |2015-05-08T12:35:36-07:00May 8th, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Fresno Fire Dept. icon: Bill Phillips

150914-bill-phillips-ffd-004Jason Swain | The Feather Online Archive

Staffer Trevor Beal interviews Bill Phillips about his life and stories from his service in the Fresno Fire Department.

The Fresno Fire Department, known for its continued community support would not have nearly as much public attention if it were not for the past efforts of men similar to Bill Phillips. Phillips, former Fresno firefighter, has taken on many tasks in his lifetime to help support the Fresno Fire Department.

Phillips, at the age of 85, has been a part of one of the greatest technologically innovative periods in fire fighting history. Over the course of his 36 year career, Phillips encountered nearly every fire fighting situation possible, from brush to electrical fires.

Though he is highly respected for his valiant undertakings throughout his career, Phillips most recognized accomplishments were his efforts to preserve the rich history of the Fresno Fire Departments and other nearby departments. From old photographs to the restoration of decommissioned fire engines, Phillips has developed a passion for the preservation of local artifacts.

In conjunction with Phillips fire service he is also a veteran of the Korean War. Upon his return from the battlefield, he went to work at Hammer Field, now known as Fresno Air Terminal. At the air field Phillips worked on and repaired battle damaged aircraft.

In 1955, Hammer field closed down, leaving 3,000 employees, including Phillips, without a job. Desperate for work, Phillips signed up to take a test administered by the fire department. Out of 3,000 applicants who took the test only the top ten highest scores were accepted; Phillips finished 9th. 1955 marked the beginning of Phillips fire fighting career.

“The first fire that I ever responded to was a car fire in Fresno,” Phillips said. “I was stationed at San Pablo and Divisadero, I spent a full year there and enjoyed every second of it.”

Phillips explained the differences in procedures at the beginning of his career compared to the end. In the early days of his career, two fire rigs were required in order to fully extinguish a fire. A pumper and a hose wagon were the optimum rigs.

The response time of the Fresno Fire Department in 1955 varied according to the location of the call.
“We were required to be completely dressed and ready in 60 seconds,” Phillips said. “It didn’t matter if we were asleep, in the shower, or using the restroom we had to get ready real quick. The city was a lot smaller when I was working, the rigs weren’t quite as fast, but we still made it to the scene quickly because of our close proximity.”

 In recent years, procedures have changed, making the response times more efficient. However, the fire department 60 years ago could respond to fires quicker, strictly due to the size of the city.

Ever since the tragedy of 9/11, the brotherly bond among firefighters has become much more evident. Phillips explained how he has witnessed this “unbreakable” bond with his own eyes.

“Firefighters, no matter what station, city, state or sometimes even country, are like a brotherhood,” Phillips said. “Just look at the recent tragedy with Captain (Pete) Dern, there are fire stations in other countries with posters promoting his recovery. There was once this man on this job named Harvey. He became paralyzed, so the firefighters signed up to take his shifts so that his family could continue to receive financial support. They worked for that man for one whole year, for no compensation at all, until they convinced to police department to hire him for a desk job. This is just one of many examples where I have witnessed this seemingly unbreakable bond that connects us firefighters.”

Phillips first efforts to preserve local history began when he was on a fire call one-quarter mile away from the fire station. He explained how this specific fire would give him the opportunity to save thousands of photographs.

“We could see the fire from the fire station just West of us,” Phillips said. “When we got there we saw that it was a huge, beautiful home that had gone up in flames. We attacked the fire, put it out and then began our overhaul, which involves opening up walls, ceilings and other parts of the house to check for fire extensions.

“It was during overhaul that we realized that the house was the former residence of world famous photographer, Claude Laval, who had already passed on. We discovered a full basement under that house which served as Laval’s laboratory. I took on the responsibility of salvaging all the negatives that survived the fire and called some people to help that owed me, including the curator of Kearney Mansion and two other firefighters. We stored the photos in a huge warehouse until years later, Mr. Edwin M. Eaton, who started Guarantee Savings and Loans, took many of the pictures out and printed a book called Vintage Fresno.”

Phillips was later award by both the Fresno Fire Department and the Laval family for the good deeds he had done for the city and efforts to preserve its history.

Since then, Phillips has taken on many other responsibilities, chiefly the restoration and preservation of Fresno Fire Department relics. Phillips began his restorative hobby when he was young and learned of old equipment that was set to be sold for scrap.

 He could not stand the thought of allowing precious and historic pieces of the department be thrown away, Phillips and some of his colleagues discussed with city hall his plans for restoration and they were approved.

The city sold Phillips a 1917 seagraves pumper in 1959 and his restorative career began.

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150914-bill-phillips-ffd-002 (1)Jason Swain | The Feather Online Archive

“I fired it up in front the shop at E street and Fresno street and drove it all the way home.” Phillips said. “She drove just fine all the way to my house and when I got home I parked her on my patio. The process of restoring a rig is different for every person, but I began by disassembling the rig down to the frame and sand blasting all the worn paint off. With the help of some people that I knew in town I painted the rig, placed the seats in her then learned how to do gold leafing, I did it all myself and I think I did a pretty good job.”

Phillips is the epitome of a conservationist, not in the environmental world but in the City of Fresno. He has worked countless hours to perfect his craft, he put in so much effort not because he sought out personal gain or glory but because he wanted to educate future generations on our societies progress and innovations.
Phillips said he is thankful for everything he learned at the Fire Department, both in labor and intellect. He was immersed in the departments culture for years and repaid the department by preserving and protecting its cherished history.
By |2015-05-02T11:34:31-07:00May 2nd, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Student of the Month: William Liao

IMG_9953 | The Feather Online Archive
Every month The Feather will highlight one student recommended by a teacher and voted upon by Feather staff members. Students are chosen depending upon several factors including and not limited to good grades, class engagement, positive attitude and special extracurricular activities.
Due to the Feather’s upgrade period during the end of March and throughout April both a Male and Female student have been selected for the month of May.

May’s male student of the Month is William Liao, ’16, chosen by school secretary, Michelle Warkentin for his genuine character and attention to detail.

“I think William should be student of the month because lately I’ve seen him being kind to the students,” Warkentin said. “He’s always very helpful and very polite when he comes into the office and he will ask if I need any help or those sorts of things. He always wants to make sure things are very clear and so I think that he needs to be honored for those things.”

Liao first attended FC in seventh grade after spending his elementary years at Maple Creek and as a homeschooled student.

This year Liao decided to join the drama department. The first year actor soon deemed the program his favorite class. He participated in Fc’s 2015 production of Music Man as part of the ensemble. Liao says that the best part about drama is learning to recite lines in various ways.

“I’m in drama for the first time so I’m enjoying that,” Liao said. “I thought it would be a fun class to join and since they were doing the music man, a famous play, I thought it would be fun to be in it. My favorite part about drama is getting to learn how to say lines differently and in different tones and getting to do all of the fun scenes in the play.”

I think William should be student of the month because lately I’ve seen him being kind to the students. He’s always very helpful and very polite when he comes into the office and he will ask if I need any help or those sorts of things. He always wants to make sure things are very clear and so I think that he needs to be honored for those things.” –Michelle Warkentin, academic advisor 

In addition to drama, Liao has played tennis with FC since freshmen year. The junior athletes’ persistence throughout the last two years has led in part to Fc’s impeccable record in the 2015 season.

“I have enjoyed playing tennis ever since my freshmen year,” Liao said. “Tennis has been going well so far. So far so good. This is the best year we have had; Fresno Christian has not lost any games this year.”

Teammate Andrew Moore,’16 says that Liao displays exceptional positivity and focus in each match.
“Will always puts out 100% effort each match,” Moor said. “It inspires the rest of us to play harder as well. He’s an encourager to the rest of us.”

On Liao’s free time he enjoys playing video games, watching movies with friends or simply spending some quiet time relaxing. Liao says that due to sports and academics, he often does not have the opportunity for much down time.

“I do consider myself really busy,” Liao said. “I manage my time well and sometimes I would have free time to relax but there are times when I am super busy and sometimes I don’t have time to relax. When I do, I surf the internet, play video games and sometimes listen to music.”

In the future Liao plans to pursue a profession in computer science. He recognizes the growing need for technological support and finds the study of computers interesting.

“Technology is taking over now days,” Liao said. “I thought it would be a good field to go into since pretty much every career is using technology and it makes good money. Also it is fascinating.”

Friend Nathan Wong attends the same church as Liao and sang alongside him in Music man’s ensemble. Wong describes Liao as a quiet and kind person.

“We were friends since the day I came here,” Wong said. “He goes to my church and that’s where I think I first met him. I would say that as far as personality he is very quiet and shy. However he is also a really nice person.”

Father Daniel Liao says that the family’s ultimate goal for Will is that he would remain strong in faith and develop the leadership qualities of a man after God’s own heart.

“Our number one hope is that he is close to Christ,” Liao said. “This trumps all other desires.
For his career we pray that he finds his passion and gift that God has given him and use it to be a productive citizen. We have always told him that our job as parents is to prepare him to be the best husband, father and/or uncle so long as God wills it. He knows that eventually he will be the man of the house and we hope that he is a Christ-centered leader of his household.”

Interesting Facts about William Liao
• His favorite book is the Harry Potter Series (he has read all seven of them!)
• Liao’s favorite movie is alien vs. predator.
• Liao has a Boston terrier and a tortoise that he got in the 1st grade.
• Liao attends church and Youth group at Fresno Chinese Gospel Church.
• If Liao could have any super power it would be super strength. He would use it to fight off criminals.
• Liao’s favorite restaurant is Red Lobster and his favorite food is orange chicken.
• Liao’s favorite video game is Super Mario Bros Wii.
• He often enjoys listening to Christian and Classical Music.

For a previous student of the month article read Student of the Month: Villanueba pursues passion for animal science, values relationships.

Follow The Feather via Twitter and Instagram: @thefeather and @thefeatheronlilne. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @skylerklee.

By |2015-04-03T12:31:08-07:00April 3rd, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Fresno State hosts Armenian Centennial Concert

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Dance Medley of Armenian Dances began with male dancers with Armenian cultural clothing and later introduced the female dancers onto the stage.

Evening of dance, music in memory of Armenian genocide

As 2015 marks the 100th year of the Armenian Genocide, various of events are planned to commemorate this tragedy. One of which is the Armenian Genocide Centennial Concert on March 8 at Fresno State.

This unique event gather the dancing groups Hamazkayin Niari Dance Ensemble, The Chookasian Armenian Concert Ensemble along with hundreds of descendants of survivors from the Armenian Genocide. The commemoration was separated to several parts which included two speeches celebrating the survival from the hand of the Ottoman Empire.

The Armenian Centennial Concert included ensemble and dancing groups as they performed several different songs represent various parts of the Armenian history. From the male dances to impress females to the wedding dance, from the escape of the Turkish to the desperation of the existence of God, and the age-old song written by Harutyun Syatian in 18th centuries to a brand new song written in 21st centuries encouraging the young generation, the concert has shown numerous cultures of the Armenian.

Founders of the Chookasian Armenian Concert Ensemble, John and Barbara Chookasian started the program in 1994. With the goal to perform traditional yet rarely heard music, John and Barbara along with six other multi-award artists performed over 15 songs in the concert. Many of the performances were folkloric which were played in several different timeline.

Few of the performances stood out the most were “Khossek Hayastani Lerner”–Speak of the Armenian mountains, “Garno Sharjoum”–The Call (to arms) has sounded, and the “Armenian Folk Song Medley”.

Khosseck Hayastani Lerner, song sang by Barbara, is a blue folkloric described the separation of the young, the family and the mother who was forced to leave her child and home. Part of the lyrics describes an Armenian mother desperately wanting to know the news of her homeland and the miserable sadness of her losing her son. Throughout the song, words “Ararat” was mention multiple times, which is the name of the mountain where the song was written. Armenian had been living on the mountain for generation, but during the genocide, Turkish took over the mountain along with many others.

The Armenian Centennial Concert is a great success. Although myself do not relate to any Armenian, I could definintely feel the struggles and all the desperation of the Armenian. As a person who enjoy art and music, I can not express the emotion on many of the elders faces when the first song was sang. It was so emotional and so comforting at the same time. It seems like after hundred of years of suppressing anger and lost of family is now first being relief. –Junior Feather staffer Michael Fu

Garno Sharjoum is a nationalistic song of the historic uprising in Province of Erzrum during the Armenian Genocide. Even though facing with great treats and risking their own lives fought against Turkish, many of the Armenian got united and stood against the rival power. This song provided a powerful message uplift the hearts of many Armenian people and given them strength to endure through the Genocide.

One of the notable song performed by Hayka Nalbandyan with saz, a traditional Armenian double-bodied lute. Played like a guitar, lute is also called bazouk. The instrument can cover large range of area. The song was origin from the folk dance. This medley is quick yet simple allowed many quickly immerse into the music.

Beside performing music and singing, the concert also invited dance group from L.A., Hamazkayin Valley Chapter Niari Dance Group was found in 2000 with 27 dancers, it now has over hundred of dancers. From aged of 5 to 28 years old, over 30 dancers participate in the centennial concert here at Fresno State.

Dance Medley of Armenian Dances performed by many of the dancers was a joyful performance. Four male dancers started the dance with Armenian cultural clothing and later introduced the female dancers onto the stage. With quick beat and colorful costumes, they quickly bring the audience to a joyful world.

Oor Aeyir Asdvadz traslate to “Where Were You O’ God?” is also performed by the Hamazkayin dance group. Song wrote by Mesdjian. This is a song of Armenian crying to God asking of where is He. The performance was slow and probably the most broken-hearted to both audiences and all survivors. Wearing purple dresses, a powerful message has sent to many of the outsider. Several eyes were fill with tears.

The concert is a great success. Although myself does not relate to any Armenian, I could definitely feel the struggles and all the desperation of the Armenian. As a person who enjoy art and music, I can not express the emotion on many of the elders faces when the first song was sang. It was so emotional and so comforting at the same time. It seems like after hundred of years of suppressing anger and lost of family is now first being relief.

Outside of the CSUF Satellite Student Union, a genocide monument is currently building right now and will be complete on April 24. Students and families are all welcome to the ceremony.

For more information about Armenian Genocide article and picture check out Armenian Centennial Genocide article in photo section.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @fmichael_0501.

By |2015-03-27T00:00:00-07:00March 27th, 2015|Community Events, Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Student of the Month: Roman Endicott

IMG_7984Every month The Feather will highlight one student recommended by a teacher and voted upon by Feather staff members. Students are chosen depending upon several factors including and not limited to good grades, class engagement, positive attitude and special extracurricular activities.

The student of the month for March is Freshmen Roman Endicott, chosen by Spanish teacher Karen Almaraz. Almaraz says that Endicott has shown a great deal of responsibility, focus and positivity within both the classroom setting and the sport’s field.

“Roman is a wonderful student and athlete,” Almaraz said. “I chose him because I truly appreciate his great work ethic and positive attitude on and off the field. In class, he’s always on time and ready to start. I know I can count on Roman to participate whenever I ask for volunteers to answer a question or read. He is constantly going out of his way to help out his classmates and despite having such a busy schedule with baseball his dedication to his studies is outstanding.”

Endicott is a “lifer” at FC. This year he has taken part in two seasonal FC sports, showed dedication in the academic sphere and is a first year member of the California Scholastic Federation (CSF).

Endicott has been a member of FC’s baseball and football program for several years and fills most of his weekday afternoons with team practices. Though Roman enjoys athletics he says that the most beneficial part of participating in a team is forming close bonds with others.

“I like sports because a lot of the friendships I have developed over the years have been a result of them and I wouldn?t have those bonds with people that are really close to me without them,” Endicott said. “I feel like the biggest part of it to me is the people that play the sport not necessarily the sport itself.”

Junior teammate Bailey Brogan says that through the short time that Endicott has spent on the team he has displayed a strong work ethic and good sportsmanship.

“Roman is a valuable member of the team,” Brogan said. “He has a good work ethic and a drive to improve on his skills. As a freshman he is very talented for his age and I can’t wait to see what the future has in store for him.”

“We would describe Roman’s personality as friendly, easy-going, funny, smart, hard working and kind. Roman has a strong work ethic. He is disciplined and works hard, especially with his school work and athletics. Our hopes for Roman’s future is that he will always have the same sincere heart he has right now and will follow God’s leading.” Jennifer Endicott, Roman’s mom

After a long week of balancing sports and school work Endicott values a bit of downtime with friends and family in order to refresh himself. He says that though being productive is healthy, spending quality time with others is of the utmost importance.

“I hardly find time during the week (to relax) but during the weekend I find time to just relax with friends and family,” Endicott said. “I feel like if I spend a weekend without catching up with my parents or hanging out with my friends then I really didn’t get anything accomplished and it wasn’t fun at all.”

In addition to academics, sports, and making quality time for family, friends and relaxation, Endicott often aids his grandfather in taking care of his property. He also attends youth group at Bethany Church after practice when he is able.

Mother Jennifer Endicott says that her son is driven, intelligent and caring. She and her husband hope that Roman will continue to steadfastly uphold these qualities throughout his life.

“We would describe Roman’s personality as friendly, easy-going, funny, smart, hard working and kind,” Jennifer said. “Roman has a strong work ethic. He is disciplined and works hard, especially with his school work and athletics. Our hopes for Roman’s future is that he will always have the same sincere heart he has right now and will follow God’s leading. Roman is a wonderful son, brother and friend and we feel so blessed to have him in our family.”

In the distant future, Endicott plans on pursing a profession in the medical field due to his interest in science and passion for helping others

“I plan to hopefully go into something in the medical field because it has always interested me,” Endicott said. “Probably working with people in surgery or being a doctor. Science is my favorite subject and I feel like there’s a lot of different things that you can learn about. It’s just really interesting.”

Though still a freshmen Endicott has expressed interest in Fresno Pacific College.

Erin Wilson, ’18, says that Endicott displays both a humorous and a caring personality.

“He?s smart and he’s nice most of the time,” Wilson said laughing. “He’s also funny. He has a good personality. He cares about people and likes helping them too which is really good.”

Interesting Facts about Roman Endicott

-If Endicott could visit anywhere in the world it would be New Zealand because of the beautiful landscape.
– Endicott is the tallest person in his family.
-Endicott’s favorite fast food restaurant is In and Out
– If Roman had to eat one food for the rest of his life it would be Chile Cheese Dogs.
– His favorite animal is a Red Panda.
-His favorite TV show is The Office
– Endicott’s favorite video game is Madden NFL50
– If Endicott could have any super power it would be invisibility because he could do anything and have fun messing with people.

Follow the Feather via Instagram and Twitter: @thefeather and @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @skylerklee.

For February’s Student of the month article, read, Student of the Month: Villanueba pursues passion for animal science, values relationships.

By |2015-03-26T00:00:00-07:00March 26th, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Yosemite preserves adventure, history

Yosemite1Yosemite National Park has a way of making first time visitors feel like old friends. The beautiful landscape that is Yosemite has been changing the hearts and eyes of its visitors for thousands of years. Some would describe the place as The Incomparable Valley.

I recently visited the Wonder Valley a couple weeks ago with my boyfriend for my birthday celebration. I had not been since I was a little girl, so it was a pleasure seeing it through older eyes of mine.

We tooled around the valley and went wherever our adventurous hearts desired. We took a small hike up to the base of Bridal Veil Falls, walked around meadows, and visited the chapel in the heart of the valley.

Jack Moriarty, student at Clovis Community College, accompanied me on this trip, in fact, it was his idea to go. He shares a bit of why he chose to visit a land so dear to his heart:

“Yosemite is a home for the homeless and a cathedral for the lost. It’s my home,” Moriarty said. “It doesn’t change, but your memories do. So many things in life are moving and changing, but Yosemite is constant. It’s a part of my heart, and so is Kathryn, so why not put those two together and create something wonderful?”

A little side note: there was a journal on a side table where you first walk into the church and it looked like people had been writing in it, so Moriarty and I started reading a few of the things people were writing, and many people from all over the world that had been married in that church, or just visited over the years, and they kept leave messages like, “Ring the bell!” or “We rang the bell! God is good!” So we decided to ring the church bell together and then documented our journey in the little journal on the side table. It was the coolest, most exhilarating thing I had ever been apart of. If you ever get the chance to ring the bell, do it.

History/People:
The Ahwahneechee, one of the seven tribes that are well known today that descend from the original tribes from before the 1800s, lived there for generations; which shortly thereafter followed by European travelers (by horseback or stagecoach) in the mid to late 1800s. In 1907, the railroad from Merced to El Portal made the journey a little more doable for newcomers and visitors, thus increasing population. Each and every day we can uncover new stories told from our ancestors who walked the very steps we know so familiarly.

Yosemite is a home for the homeless and a cathedral for the lost. It’s my home. It doesn’t change, but your memories do. So many things in life are moving and changing, but Yosemite is constant. It’s a part of my heart. — Jack Moriarty, student at Clovis Community College

Places:
Within the history of Yosemite, different variations of communities had thrived in the little big valley and dispersed over many nations, leaving their mark. From early lodging establishments, such as the Wawona Hotel, which gave visitors an archaic setting for when they traveled, to historic miners and their mining sites during the gold rush. Yosemite preserves adventure, history of the region, its peoples and culture.

Stories:
There are details of the Mariposa Battalion entering the Valley of Yosemite in 1851 in recent history books. The result of Euro-Americans coming to the valley meant the removal of the Ahwahneechee native tribe. Travelers in the early years came on foot, horseback, and train. In 1864, President Abraham Lincoln signed a bill granting California the Valley of Yosemite and Mariposa Grove. It was not until 1890 when Yosemite National Park was established.

Collections:
A Yosemite museum flourishes and thrives with remnants of the past and evidence of the valley’s ancestors. More than 4 million items fill its quarters. A research library is maintained with more than 10,00 books relating to the Valley of Yosemite. In recent years, the National Parks Service (NPS) has collected an oral history project of interviews of people’s stories and experiences related to Yosemite.

Preservation:
The NPS is devoted to preserving the Yosemite Valley to honor it’s history and culture and to keep it at its original value throughout the years for visitors, newcomers, and old friends.

Research and Studies:
There is ongoing research about the history of the park. Researchers and land lovers come from all over the world to see what there is to see about the beautiful land that is Yosemite and uncover facts, new and old, for people like us to discover.

There are events coming up in the future, courtesy of the NPS:

Oct. 1, Yosemite will be celebrating 125 years of being a National Park.
Aug. 25, 2016, the NPS turns 100 years old.

Moriarty has visited the National Park of Yosemite four times in the past month, and looks forward to “return home” soon; as do I.

If you have not made it up to Yosemite recently, or at all, I would urge you to take that jump and go. Like all earthly things, it will not be there forever, and neither will we, so why not see all the beauty there is to see in this world while we are still able to?

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @Kamschend.

For more opinions, read the March 24 article, College Corner: Fresno State Standards Changing.

By |2015-03-24T00:00:00-07:00March 24th, 2015|Destinations, Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Get to know: Trevor Beal

Basketball has been a strong passion for Trevor Beal, he began playing in fourth grade and joined the varsity team his freshman year. He has played every position over the years, but his favorite is shooting guard.

Jacobson: How long have you been attending Fresno Christian?

Beal: Since the fourth grade, I came to Fresno Christian from Clovis Christian and it was a big change. Fresno Christian, even though it is small, has many good aspects athletically and academically.

Jacobson: Do you play any sports other than basketball?

Beal: Even though basketball is my favorite sport by far, I also play golf. Golf is a very relaxing sport, but at the same time, very mentally challenging.

Jacobson: What is your favorite part about playing sports?

Beal: Winning games. My least favorite part is of course is losing games, losing is one of the biggest reasons I practice and put in extra work. Playing basketball and golfing have taught me to push myself so that I can win.

Jacobson: What is your favorite Bible verse?

Beal: Probably Jeremiah 29:11. “For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.”

Jacobson: What is your most cherished school memory?

Beal: My favorite memory from Fresno Christian is from my freshman year when our basketball team won the Valley Championship, and continued on to the second round of the State Basketball Playoffs.

Jacobson: What are your goals this year?

Beal: My goals for the rest of this year are to excel in academics and on the golf course and know that I had a good high school experience.

Jacobson: Now that you are a senior, what challenges have you been facing?

Beal: Getting acquainted with the real world. People talk about how it?s not that much different, but it is. There?s a lot more that goes into just living when you?re older.

Jacobson: Who inspires and motivates you?

Beal: I motivate myself. My dad also gives a lot of inspiration and coaches me.

Jacobson: Where will you be attending next fall and what do you want to major in?

Beal: I will be attending Fresno State and i plan to major in finance. After graduating from Fresno State, I plan on attaining my law degree from University of San Francisco.

This writer can be reached via Twitter @katiejacobson44. Follow the Feather on Twitter @thefeather.

For more features, read the March 2 article, Where are they now? David Lee.

By |2015-03-23T00:00:00-07:00March 23rd, 2015|Announcements, Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

FC hits NY: Day 5 (SLIDESHOW)

Editors1Viviana Hinojosa | The Feather Online Archive

Feather editors Ryan King, Chloe Mueller, Rees Roggenstein and Sara Peterson bask in the glow of a CSPA Digital Gold Crown while at Columbia University, March 20.

Since arriving in New York, the staff have awaited this moment with nausea. Hoping that they could once again grab the Columbia Scholastic Press Association Digital Gold Crown at the 91st annual convention and continue the winning streak. The team began the day with hope in their eyes.

Just like every other day, the team straggled into the lobby where the students met and then left to their various destination. Today their trip to Columbia University and find out their fate. Editors-in-Chiefs Sara Peterson and Chloe Mueller led a class early in the morning, while the rest of team like previous days attended the other various lectures by prominent figures within the journalistic society.

After the first class, the team decided to rest and work on the ever needy Feather. Students took this opportunity to rest in the lounges around the college. Finally the moment arrived, the editors filed into the auditorium where their fate rested.

Because of the over 2,600 students and 299 schools in attendance, the names of the winners were rattled off in an alphabetical order. The team waited with faces tense and eyes glued to the screen, their time came and went, the Feather had not been called, all the editors turned in shock and confusion.

However, God has a since of humor known only to himself. The association misplaced The Feather in the line-up, and ten minutes later were called to the front of the auditorium.

The team headed outside to find snow piling upon itself, increasing the joy of their seven-month accomplishment. The entirely new team had pulled it off; they won a Gold Crown, proving that anybody with a heart can make it to the top. After taking numerous photos out in the snow of this terrific event for the school and the program, the team headed back for some rest.

After making it back to the hotel, students split off and took a rest in preparation for a celebratory dinner, all fees paid for. Joyful and excited, the team rested and headed off to dinner. The last day touring New York was over and their time to leave had come. For a final time, students will once again rise early, but this time to head back home.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @Josh_Carter.

For more news, read the March 19 article, FC hits NY: Day 4 (SLIDESHOW).

By |2015-03-23T00:00:00-07:00March 23rd, 2015|Features, News, Photos 2014-15, Uncategorized|1 Comment

Junior NOTS movie: Saturday Night Live

FeatherLogoAs each class prepares their NOTS movies for debut on March 28, the junior class of 2016 believes they have what it takes to receive the overall “Best Movie” award.

Though the juniors originally planned on recreating the movie, High School Musical,” due to a lack of class participation they decided to recreate the Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon. So far, the class has filmed many short skits that can be regularly seen on the Tonight Show, such as “Mean Tweets.”

By recreating scenes people already know and love the class hopes to get students excited over their production.

Gillian Rea, ’16, is the co-director of the junior NOTS movie. She believes that the Jimmy Fallon show was a good choice, because it didn’t require a large number of students to be on screen at once. Rea hopes this often watched TV-series will increase the productions popularity.

“When we decided to film a recreation of the Jimmy Fallon show I was really excited,” Rea said. “I love watching his show each week, and I hope the rest of the student body is able to relate to this film and understand where the jokes are coming from. I have had an excellent group of students who are committed to this production, and their help has been invaluable. We hope all the parents and students appreciate our movie and all the work that went into creating it.”

One of the head actors of the junior NOTS film is Tyler Breedlove, ’16. Tyler has played a major role in the production of the film since it first started. He has made the effort to attend every meeting and help in any way he can. Breedlove believes his acting and natural sense of humor help the storyline flow naturally.

“When we originally started filming for High School Musical, I was cast to play the main character,” Breedlove said. “As things started changing I told the directors I still wanted to be involved and help any way I could. I was able to play a main role in many of our skits and help write them as well. I can’t wait to see our movie on the big screen at NOTS.”

Whether or not the junior class wins the award for best picture, students involved thoroughly enjoyed their experience, and look forward to making another movie next year.

All the high school movies will be on display the morning of March 28 for parents and public view, and also to vote for the awards, from 9-11 a.m. in the Green Room. For more information, contact vbelmont@fresnochristian.com.

For another features article, read Former campus teacher reflects on time spent at FC

Follow <i>The Feather</i> via Twitter <a href=”https://twitter.com/thefeather” target=”_blank”>@thefeather</a>,  Instagram <a href=”https://instagram.com/thefeatheronline” target=”_blank”>@thefeatheronline</a> and Facebook <a href=”https://www.facebook.com/thefeatheronline” target=”_blank”>@thefeatheronline</a>. This writer can be reached via Twitter:@JustinHFeather

By |2015-03-23T00:00:00-07:00March 23rd, 2015|FC Events, Features, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

FC hits NY: Day 4 (SLIDESHOW)

DSC_7293Ryan King, Photographer

With two days of touring behind them, Feather editors and adviser Greg Stobbe pose in from of the Freedom Tower in NYC before they visit the 9-11 Memorial Museum, March 19.

With two full days in New York under their belts, the editors prepared themselves for their third full day in the city. One more day and the team will spend the rest of the week at Columbia University for the Columbia Scholastic Press Association’s 91st convention.

Warm clothes were strongly suggested and the group departed from the hotel at 9:30 a.m to take the subway as FC hits NY and visit the 9/11 Memorial.

The 9-11 Memorial has been in the stages of construction since 2007 and is still being added to. The highlight of the site was the museum dedicated to honoring those who lost their lives and their loved ones.

After the memorial, the editors made their way down Wall Street and popped in to the Trinity Church. Following the cathedral the group made their way to Battery Park where they watched street dancers perform and viewed the Statue of Liberty from afar.

From there, the girls made their way back to Times Square to shop freely and the boys took a trip to Grand Central Station before returning back to Times Square to shop.

The group met up at 7:45 p.m. to make their way to the 8 p.m. Broadway showing of An American in Paris and ate a late dinner at TGI Fridays.

First timer in New York City, Trevor Beal, shares his impressions of the city along with his favorite aspects of the trip.

“This is my first time ever being in NYC,” Beal said, “I have been to other big cities before but none compare to NYC, Grand Central Station and Wall Street have been my favorite parts of the trip so far, along with the Phantom of the Opera play and 911 Memorial Museum.”

Chloe Mueller, Editor-in-Chief, says she will enjoy giving a session at the 91st CSPA Journalism Convention at Columbia University.

“This year gave me a new look on the trip because we are teaching sessions at Columbia University,” Mueller said. “But the sightseeing is still fun. I loved the 9/11 Memorial.”

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @gaby_siqueros.

For more news, read the March 18 article, FC hits NY: Day 2 (SLIDESHOW, VIDEO).

Alumna Heather Carr: life with professional athlete

carr 6Courtesy Heather (Neal) Carr

Campus alumna Heather (Neal, ’08) Carr) updates her story since graduating, including marriage to Derek Carr and new baby, Dallas. Carr updates her years since grad, wife of NFL quarterback

Carr updates her years since grad, wife of NFL quarterback

Many FC alumni move on to bigger and better things, taking what they have learned from their years in high school and applying them to life in the real world. Very seldom do we discover that some of those alumni end up being in the spotlight. Former FC alumna Heather Carr graduated with the class of 2008, and went on to marry current NFL Oakland Raiders quarterback and former Fresno State quarterback Derek Carr.

During high school, Heather (Neal, ’08) Carr discovered her passion for cheerleading, hoping to pursue it in college. However at the time she attended Fresno State, the cheerleading program did not exist due to the absence of a cheer coach.

“Originally, I thought I would go to Azusa, they had a really good cheer squad, but then I think the whole dynamic of staying close to home really drew me in, and I wasn’t ready to leave, and God definitely knew I wasn’t ready to get out there and do things on my own, so I went to Fresno State,” Carr said. “Almost all of my cheer girls stayed in Fresno, and went to FPU, or Fresno State, and it was nice to know that they were there, so we could hang out and be with each other all the time. That really helped going to Fresno State.”

Carr majored in teaching, gaining her desire for teaching when she was in the fourth grade. Her inspiration for this was her mother, who was a fourth grade teacher, and who Carr would go watch intriguingly as she taught her students. Although she is still involved in spiritual mentoring, God led her on a different path from teaching when she met Derek.

Heather Carr worked at Hollister at the start of her freshman year at Fresno State and later went on to work at BJ’s, where she encountered the newly discovered football star.

“I met Derek my junior year, and I actually met him at my work,” Carr said. “It was his first year at Fresno State and after we met, we just started hanging out at school. He graduated high school early to come to Fresno State, so when I met him, he was on the team, but he didn’t start or anything he was just red shirting.”

After some time of dating and getting to know each other, Derek and Heather decided to take their relationship a step forward, marrying in 2012. Being married to a football player in college was a fun experience to Heather Carr.

“It was awesome to be married in college; I loved it. I think when you find that right person, it doesn’t matter how old you are,” Carr said. “Especially us, because we were both really mature for our age, and we were just ready to settle down. In college it was fun; we had class together. I think we made it that way, and so it made class really fun and interesting. But its always fun to have class with your spouse.”

In August of 2013, the Carr family added a new member: Dallas. Since Dallas was born at the beginning of football season, it made it difficult for Heather, being a married mom in college and Derek being away at practice, normally from 5-9 p.m.

“Derek knows exactly what he wants and what he needs to do, and he will get it done,” Heather said. “He took summer school before I even met him so that he could graduate, so he could just go play football. He had a plan, before he even got into college.

“Dallas was God’s plan, and according to Derek, he grew more chest hairs because with Dallas, he now had more responsibilities. So now he had a family, more responsibilities: Derek would even say in the games, ‘he would play harder knowing that he had to get into the NFL because he had a family, and he had to feed them.’ It does, it makes you work harder.”

All of the hard work and determination payed off in 2014, when Derek Carr was drafted to go play in the NFL for the Oakland Raiders. The lifestyle of Heather and Dallas Carr drastically changed with this new chapter in their lives.

You get to meet and interact with a lot of people. I am in a Bible study group with the other wives, and its awesome because you can share God’s love with people who don’t even have that. Because in the NFL, people have I guess, quote everything, so it’s awesome to be able to share what they don’t have, and that is Jesus. So that is definitely a pro of being a part of all this. It is just that you get to reach a lot of people with where you are at. –Heather (Neal) Carr, ’08, former FC cheerleader, wife of Derek Carr 

“It’s different in the NFL,” Heather said. “There is literally no phone conversation, no texting the whole day. He is gone from 4:30 a.m., to about 6 p.m., and we don’t hear from him all day. Then, he would come home at 6 p.m., we would eat dinner, an then he would study the playbook and watch film, so we really don’t get to see him all that much.

“It is very different being an NFL wife compared to a college wife,” Heather continued. “Especially since Dallas is at an age now where he knows when daddy is gone, so its hard. I get tired cause he’s moving around and crawling on everything, so when Derek is home, it is nice to get a little break.”

Although the football season is tiring for Carr with Derek’s absence, the off season is a much needed reward for the family of three.

“We get a break around December, and then they start back again in April,” Heather said. “I love that we get an off season, because with some jobs, a lot of people don’t get that, and we get to spend time together as a family. Our biggest thing we love to do when we get our family time is just staying home, going to the park, playing soccer, anything that we can do with Dallas, just because we don’t get to stay home a lot.”

Being a NFL wife, Carr loves the new experiences she gets to encounter. Born from a strong Christian family, Carr loves the opportunity to share with the other NFL wives the light of the Lord, something that is very important to her, and the family as well.

“You get to meet and interact with a lot of people. I am in a Bible study group with the other wives, and its awesome because you can share God’s love with people who don’t even have that,” Heather said. “Because in the NFL, people have I guess, quote everything, so it’s awesome to be able to share what they don’t have, and that is Jesus. So that is definitely a pro of being a part of all this. It is just that you get to reach a lot of people with where you are at.”

Although there are many benefits of being a family member of an NFL player, there are also some hardships.

“You really don’t have a lot of time with your family. I know it is Dallas and I alone a lot during the season,” Carr said. “My parents have a condo up by where we live, so they are there almost every week, and it is really nice to have my mom watch him sometimes so I can go run some errands, or stuff like that. Just connecting with the girls (the wives), we have playdates with the kids, and things like that is fun. But that is definitely a con is that you really don’t get a lot of time with your husband.”

The Carr family had a bit of a scare in August of 2013, when their son Dallas was born with intestinal malrotation, which is a blockage of the digestive tract due to the twisting of intestines, that prevents the proper passage of food. They found the problem approximately six hours after he was born, and they rushed him to Valley Children’s Hospital when they noticed he wouldn’t eat, and he kept throwing up. There, Dallas had his first of may surgeries at only ten hours old.

“We were actually really blessed, because he was born eight days early, and if he was born on time, he might have not made it. So, that was definitely God’s blessing on us,” Carr said. “Although the fist surgery went well, he still wasn’t getting better. After 21 days, we finally got to go home, even thought he was still throwing up, but they told us it would correct itself over time. We took him in again a week later, where they admitted him and he had his third surgery. That was the toughest, just because I remember thinking, is this ever going to end?”

Throughout this difficult time, Carr really relied on the Lord, and He did not disappoint.

At this time, Derek was gone, because he was in football, so his trainer would call him off of the field, straight from practice, to let him know when Dallas was having another surgery,” Carr said. “So, it was really hard for both me and Derek. It was really hard for him to focus on football when his son was having surgery in the hospital.

“Before Dallas’ surgery, Derek wasn’t here yet, but I was praying with Dallas, asking God to show me a sign that this is going to end. Yes, this was his plan, and he was making us stronger through this, and we are trusting in you, and praising you, but I would love a sign just to know. Dallas was asleep at this time, out completely, and he sits up, looks at me, and winks, and then instantly falls right back asleep. Right then, I knew, we were done with this. It was the best feeling ever.”

All of the obstacles they went through made them realize that they could handle anything, and that God was doing this for his glory. It was humbling to the Carr family that they got to share God’s love and light through Dallas’s story.

Heather hopes to continue her love of teaching and help share Jesus’s light with many young adults, and in the mean time, will continue to enjoy time spent with her family, and living the life of the Raiders quarterback’s biggest fan.

This writer can be reached via twitter: @ashhasthescoop.

For more features, read the March 17 article, Annual auction raises over 135,000 for campus
.

By |2015-03-18T00:00:00-07:00March 18th, 2015|Alumni, Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

32nd Annual FCS Auction raises over $140,000

auctionFC file photo

The 32nd annual FC Auction raised over $140,000 for Fresno Christian, March 14.

The 32nd Annual FCS auction is a highly anticipated event in which the generosity and close knit community is exemplified. Each year, families and FC enthusiasts look forward to the opportunity for a fun way to give back to the school which has touched their lives.

At the auction March 14, attendees were given a unique auction number and were able to bid upon different items including desserts, gift cards and donated items. Once dinner was served participants enjoyed a quick trailer of the upcoming April musical, Music Man.

Over the course of dinner the silent tables began to close and a raffle took place where attendees could win a variety of different hundred dollar prizes.

The highlight of the night, the live auction, offered a wide array of prizes. Prizes included everything from front row seats at the 2014-’15 graduation ceremony to signed helmets from Oakland Raider QB Derek Carr.

Every table at the auction sold out within weeks. The auction brought in a record breaking $140,000+. The money is used in multiple ways but is focused on filling the funding gap between tuition and the amount needed to operate the school.

Dr. Sam Hinton, father to Max Hinton, shares his impressions of this years auction and remembers attending his first auction for FC.

“I started volunteering at the auction when I was a sophomore at Fresno Pacific because that’s where they used to hold the auction,” Hinton said. “The auction this year is very intimate and elegant, I love how the auction brings in money and helps the community get together and remind each other why we support the school and what a great place it is.”

I have co-chaired the auction with Pete DeGroot for at least 10 years now. My favorite memory is when my girls to attended FC and now I get to watch my grandchildren grow up here. The whole thing has been a blessing and now I can give back because my kids are grown. I expect to net over $100,000 for the good cause of this school and help all the young people who attend here. –Marvel French, grandmother to Maddie and Maicy Luginbill, and FC Board member

Former history teacher Ellen King comments on the decorations and reminisces on the numerous years she spent teaching.

“The auction is decorated beautifully, I love the tables, the centerpieces, Chinese lanterns it’s all just so beautiful,” King said. “I have attended almost every auction, I honestly cannot remember not attending one. Coming to the auction makes me really miss the kids and teaching.”

Marvel French, grandmother to Maddie and Maicy Luginbill, comments on her favorite FC memories and shares her expectations for the 32nd annual auction.

“I have co-chaired the auction with Pete DeGroot for at least 10 years now,” French said. “My favorite memory is when my girls to attended FC and now I get to watch my grandchildren grow up here. The whole thing has been a blessing and now I can give back because my kids are grown. I expect to net over $100,000 for the good cause of this school and help all the young people who attend here.”

Nancy Weis, long time auction attendee, shares her first impressions of the auction.

“I have attended the auction for about 20 years, my children graduated from here and now my grandchild attend. We want to support this school because we love it and what it stand for,” Weis said. “We have a lot of great memories here, we met a lot of great people here at FC and my children made great friends. Coming in the auction just looks beautiful and it just feels likes its going to be a great night.”

Senior FC student, Collin Winegarden, came out to the auction to perform with his drama class. The class sang and danced to a portion of the Music Man, which will be debuting in April.

“I’m here for drama because we performed a dance from our upcoming musical Music Man,” Winegarden said. “I think it went well but we still have a little room for improvement. It was a good practice run for us because now we know what we have to work on.”

Superintendent Jeremy Brown talks about his first year at the auction as Superintendent. This experience has given him a new perspective on the event.

“I love interacting with the different families, it’s amazing how many people come out here to support. Its a full house, its a great lively events and everyone is here to support Fresno Christian Schools,” Brown said. “I went last year and didn’t really know many people because I was just hired. But this year it’s great because I know the community a lot better.”

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_sarapeterson.

For more features, read the March 16 article, Career Day: Professionals educate students, share experiences.

By |2015-03-17T00:00:00-07:00March 17th, 2015|FC Events, Features, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

FC hits NY: Day 2 (SLIDESHOW, VIDEO)

GroupHotelDay2Greg Stobbe, adviser

While the group still needs to tighten up sessions for the CSPA convention, Feather editors gather in the lobby of Hotel Edison before they embark on a day of touring Manhattan, March 17.

The Feather editors started their first day of tourism in New York City on the holy day for the Irish: St. Patty’s Day, March 17. With a couple of days dedicated to checking out the Big Apple before attending and speaking at the 91st annual Columbia Scholastic Press Association’s (CSPA) convention, today FC hits NY.

Attempting to avoid a sea of green chaos, adviser Greg Stobbe suggested the team spend most of their day in Little Italy and Soho, eating and shopping. The staff departed Hotel Edison at 8:15 a.m. and made their way to the nearest subway station before the parades and celebrators crowded Times Square.

Not eating before their departure, the staff insisted that the first thing they do in Little Italy was get breakfast before treading onward to shopping. Heading the cries of his people, Stobbe led his staff to Ferrara: an Italian bakery and cafe with a wide range of different kinds of food options. Though breakfast meats were available, many of the students opted for the pastries.

After finishing breakfast the female staffers abandoned their male counterparts to get an early start on their shopping, leaving the men behind in the cafe in favor of rushing to Soho and all its stores had to offer. Their shopping spree was short lived, however, as a couple of the girls fell ill and left Soho early to get back to the comfort of their hotel rooms.

Though the women were down for the count, the men endured through the elements and their check balances. Before impending bankruptcy set itself upon them, Stobbe intervened and called the men to Il Palazzo where they enjoyed an authentic Italian lunch. The boys left for the hotel at 2 p.m. and arrived at around 2:30 p.m.

Having about five hours of rest time before the first play of the New York trip, students took full advantage of this opportunity to get much needed shut eye. Many of the students stayed awake from Monday morning to Tuesday afternoon without sleep, easily achieving an “all-nighter.”

After the five-hour nap, the students woke from their dens and began preparing for the first play of many on their trip. Upon departing the hotel 7:10 p.m. everyone soon felt the nose numbing wind that New York had to offer. Racing from the subways and the streets the team eventually made their way to the first play, The King and I, which began 8 p.m. and ended at 11 p.m.

Once the play ended, hunger soon plagued the students again. They left the theatre and moved to the subways to get back to Times Square. Upon arriving, the team immediately spotted an Applebees and moved like predatory animals towards this beacon. Once they finished their food everyone departed for the hotel and arrived at 12:30 a.m.

Most of the Feather staff went to their rooms and prepared the next day for the journalism conference at Columbia University.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @RRoggenstein.

For more about The Feather in NY, read the March 16 article, FC hits NY: Day 1 (Slideshow, Video).

FC hits NY: Day 1 (SLIDESHOW, VIDEO)

IMG_6974Adviser Greg Stobbe

Nine Feather editors are traveling to NY to attend and speak at the 91st annual Columbia Scholastic Press Association’s convention. The staff arrives in Times Square ready for a night tour, March 16.

After arriving to San Francisco the night before, a total of nine journalists boarded the plane on Monday, heading to New York, March 16. Editors Rees Rogenstein, Josh Carter, Chloe Mueller, Gaby Siquiros, Ryan King, Callista Fries, Trevor Beal, John Dooman, Sara Peterson and chaperones Angie Fries and adviser Greg Stobbe arrive at the airport around 8 a.m. and will tour that evening as FC hits NY.

The Feather staff will be heading to Columbia University, for the 91st annual CSPA Spring Convention, March, 18-20. Along with being nominated for the Gold Crown by the Columbia Scholastic Press Association (CSPA), Fries, King, Peterson and Mueller will be presenting workshops during the convention. Throughout their stay, the editors will also spend two days touring Manhattan.

While at the CSPA Spring Convention, editors will be attending classes and workshops relating to journalism and school run newspapers. At the end of the Spring Convention, The Feather staff will attend the 2015 Online Digital Crown Awards ceremony, in which they will receive either a Silver or Gold crown.

After arriving in New York around, 7:30 p.m., the staff departed from the JFK airport and headed towards their home for the next week, the Hotel Edison.

Upon arrival students dropped off their luggage and headed to Juniors for a late dinner and then traveled to the subway to buy their metro passes for the week.

Students then took a quick tour of Times Square and headed back to their hotel, to work on articles, and to get some much needed rest.

EDITORS NOTE: Stay tuned for daily updates including slideshows and videos as FC hits NY.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @rynnking_.

For more news, read the March 13 article, Blood Drive honors FC alumna currently in recovery.

Career Fair: Professionals educate students

IMG_1146Jason Swain | The Feather Online Archive

Over 10 different speakers gave presentations on career choices and how to begin preparations for them in the 4th annual Career Fair, March 11.

In hopes of better educating campus students on different career paths, FC hosted the 4th annual career fair, March 11. Students attended three sessions throughout the afternoon followed by a meet and greet in the court yard.

The session included a variety of different speakers such as ABC 30 reporter Amanda Venegas, ultrasound technician Robyn Hill, superintendent Jeremy Brown, Engineering student Danielle St. Marie, NASA project manager Suzy Dodd, nurse Laura Sherfield, speech pathologist Christie Edmondson, Detective David Fries, CEO of High Tech Homes Jay Cobb, veterinarian Todd Conlan, occupational therapist Dorothy Siqueiros, and senior gas estimator Scott Belmont.

Aspiring engineer Breanna Jennings, ’15, says that she learned about the educational requirements and qualities an engineer should possess.

“I definitely went to the engineer session, they hardly ever have an engineer come and speak so I was really excited to learn about what it takes to be in that profession,” Jennings said. “It was awesome that she [/fusion_builder_column]

[Danielle St. Marie] is an alumni and was willing to come back and give us really helpful information.”

Venegas gave a session and Claire Kollenkark, ’16, looks forward to career day every year.

“Amanda’s session was really fun,” Kollenkark said. “She is like a local celebrity and she took time out of her day to teach us a thing or two about what she does. Now that I’m a junior, I realized how soon I’m going to be picking a career and it’s great that the school cares enough to put something like this on with so many different people to chose from.”

My favorite presentation was probably the veterinarian,” Counts said. “He was very friendly and not intimidating. He just laid all the information out and told us that this is what you choose to get into if you pursue this career. He helped me because I’ve been looking down the veterinarian path.  — Freshman Celeste Counts

Occupational Therapist Dorothy Siqueiros urges students to get a jump start on their career and connect with other people for the best educational and financial options available.

“I know that college has gotten really expensive over the years and I really hope kids out there know that there are people to talk to that have gone or are going through the whole process of earning their degrees,” Siqueiros said. “Talk to people and find out what process is going to work best for you. And I tell people all the time to go observe the job they wish to pursue while they’re still in high school, you can either rule it out or keep looking into it.”

Laura Sherfield, a nurse at Valley Children’s Hospital gives her advice to teens and insight on how her passion for nursing began.

“I first decided to pursue a career in nursing when I was really young,” Sherfield said. “My mom was a nurse also so I grew up around it and fell in love with it from the beginning. I tend to have more of a compassionate personality. I would advise you high school kids to get involved early in a hospital, job shadow, become an intern, and get a job as soon as possible to gain as much experience as possible.”

CEO of Forward Advantage Chris Roggenstein is happy with the diversity and serving opportunities the annual career day holds.

“I liked the diversity of the student service projects,” Roggenstein said. “It let students serve in a manner that they were gifted and hopefully with an attitude of serving God while serving their fellow man.”

Senior PG&E gas estimator Scott Belmont comments on the success that hard work and dedication could potentially bring to your career.

“I am a gas transition design engineer,” Belmont said. “I started working for PG&E 30 years ago on the end of a shovel and gradually worked my way up and took a lot of different positions and here I am now. When Michelle Warkentin called me to speak, I agreed because it’s great that people come in and give students a variety of different careers to look in to.”

Freshman Celeste Counts shared that she was drawn to the veterinarian in particular, due to her own interests in the trade.

“My favorite presentation was probably the veterinarian,” Counts said. “He was very friendly and not intimidating. He just laid all the information out and told us that this is what you choose to get into if you pursue this career. He helped me because I’ve been looking down the veterinarian path.”

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.
This writer can be reached via Twitter: @gaby_siqueiros.

For another news article read Campus families gather to support 32nd FC Auction

By |2015-03-16T00:00:00-07:00March 16th, 2015|FC Events, Features, Leadership, Uncategorized|0 Comments

College trip to SoCal, explore universities

photo (17)Michelle Warkentin, academic advisor

Campus juniors and seniors traveled for a college trip to SoCal to visit universities, March 3-4.

Juniors and seniors took their annual College Trip, March 3-4. Ten students attended along with Academic advisor Michelle Warkentin, Andrea and Scott Donaghe. The group visited four different universities in southern California along with a famous ice cream parlor for dinner.

The first college the group visited was the University of Southern California. The school first opened in 1880 to 53 students. The students were amazed by the architecture and the size of the campus.

While at USC, Morgan Miller, ’16, fell in love with the atmosphere.

“The campus was really beautiful,” Miller said. “It was very spacious and the buildings were outstanding. I also really liked the food they offered on campus. Everyone was very welcoming and nice.”

Andrew Moore, ’16, although a faithful USC fan, knows the price makes attending the school difficult.

“I grew up as a big fan of USC,” Moore said. “I thought the campus itself was awesome. However, the price makes attending the school unlikely for me. But I will still always be a fan of the university.”

The second college the group attended was Azusa Pacific University. The group was able to meet up with alumnus Elora Hargis, ’14, before touring the campus. APU was the first Christian campus the group visited.

The Christian atmosphere of Azusa Pacific, along with their gym, seemed important to Caleb Goodale, ’16.

“I liked how the school offered chapels and worship sessions,” Goodale said. “Also I wasn’t expecting their gym to be that big. It was probably one of the nicest gyms I’ve seen. However, I didn’t care for the fact that you were only allowed to miss 10 chapels.”

Junior Bailey Brogan did not like the way the campus was set up. He also did not care for the atmosphere the campus offered.

“I didn’t really like how the school was split up into a west campus and east campus. Although they offered a trolley ride, it still seemed inconvenient,” Brogan said. “Also, the west campus seemed sort of cramped. But we had just come from USC so Azusa didn’t really have a chance.”

My favorite part of the college trip would have to be going to Farrells for dinner. It was like walking into an old diner and definitely made you feel like you were taken back to a different time period. It was a great bonding time with my fellow classmates and we left there with many memories to share. –Junior Timothy Nyberg

That night, the group went to Farrell’s Ice Cream Parlour Restaurant for dinner. Majority of the group agreed that dinner was the best part of the trip. Many of the students had participated in Kids Day earlier that morning and were running on their last bit of energy, which made the night that much more enjoyable.

After waiting an hour, the group was seated and the waitress, DeAnna, set the tone for the evening with her animated and sassy personality. The group decided to celebrate Brogan’s belated birthday, which included him going to “boot camp” once he finished his meal.

Timothy Nyberg, ’16, found the night very enjoyable and a dinner he would not soon forget.

“My favorite part of the college trip would have to be going to Farrells for dinner,” Nyberg said. “It was like walking into an old diner and definitely made you feel like you were taken back to a different time period. It was a great bonding time with my fellow classmates and we left there with many memories to share.”

The next morning, although tired, the group woke up bright and early to visit the next two universities. First on the list was the University of California Riverside.

Senior Justin Porter enjoyed the tour and learning about the school’s different research projects.

“I liked how the tour guide spoke about the research that their science program does,” Porter said. “I thought their study on the mantis shrimp and that spider with the golden silk was interesting. Also, the way they mapped the citrus DNA was pretty neat.”

The college trip is important because it allows students the opportunity to visit college campuses outside of our local area. For some students this is their first campus visit out of Fresno. I try to pick different types of schools so students are exposed to both large and small campuses, public and private. –Michelle Warkentin, academic advisor

While disappointed with one of the schools programs, Elise Winegarden, ’15, thought the campus was nice.

“I thought the campus was beautiful,” Winegarden said. “There were plenty of trees and open space outside. The orange trees smelled lovely too! However, their nursing program isn’t one of their stronger programs so this wasn’t the school for me.”

The final school the group visited was California Baptist University. There, they met up with alumnus Annalise Rosik who spoke about what she has enjoyed so far.

The first part of the campus that the group explored was the cafeteria, or the “caf”. CBU has the third best cafeteria in California and the students enjoyed its all-you-can-eat policy. Collin Winegarden, ’15, saw the “caf” as one of the schools best features.

“Obviously I loved the cafeteria and unlimited food!” Winegarden said. “The recreational center was pretty awesome too. I loved the variety of activities you could do there. But what I loved most was the campus itself. I thought it was the perfect size with plenty of trees.”

Although he enjoyed the cafeteria, Joshua Carter, ’16, feels like the university still needs to build a stronger reputation.

“As a school, CBU is great, however, it doesn?t have a reputation which is one of its problems,” Carter said. “It needs to build a stronger reputation and one way to do that is hiring better professors and create strength in its different fields. I think by doing that, they will be known as a great Christian college and just a great college in general.”

Academic advisor, Michelle Warkentin, has been in charge of the annual college trip since it first began. She sees it as beneficial for the students who take it and enjoys seeing the students experience college life.

“The college trip is important because it allows students the opportunity to visit college campuses outside of our local area,” Warkentin said. “For some students this is their first campus visit out of Fresno. I try to pick different types of schools so students are exposed to both large and small campuses, public and private.”

“In my opinion the best part of the trip was seeing students walk through the massive libraries, peek into the lecture halls, and eat lunch together on the campuses. It was neat to see them experiencing college campuses first hand and open their eyes to the possibilities of what lies ahead of them after high school.”

Overall, everyone who took the trip enjoyed it and felt it was worth its while. They will be taking the trip again next year for any juniors or seniors that are interested.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.
This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_olivialoren_.

For more features, read the March 11 article, Heritage honors Music Department with Sweepstakes Award (PODCAST, SLIDESHOW).

By |2015-03-12T00:00:00-07:00March 12th, 2015|FC Events, Features, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Music department earns Heritage Sweepstakes (PODCAST, SLIDESHOW)

Festival1Susan Ainley

The campus music department was honored with the Sweepstakes Award at the Worldstrides Heritage Music Festival, March 5-6. Seniors Ivette Ibarra and Andrew Guthrie, pictured, won Maestro awards, while Guthrie also won the “When you Wish” award.

Senior Andrew Guthrie earns Maestro, “When You Wish” honors

Every year students from the music department embark on a journey to Southern California to attend a singing festival, while either going to Worldstrides Heritage or ACSI. These festivals are to commemorate all the long hours practicing as a whole to put on a performance for high ranking adjudicators.

At 12 p.m., FC students boarded the charter bus en route to the 35th annual Worldstrides Heritage Music Festival, down to Los Angeles, California, March 5-6. Directors Susan Ainley and Lesley Bannister have never traveled to compete in this Southern California music festival, being new to their positions this year.

While attending the festival for the duration of their trip, they were able to visit Medieval Times, as well as Disneyland and participate in other recreational activities. Students were able to visit many sites in LA, but the majority of the trip was spent preparing and performing for the Heritage Festival competitions.

After getting back on the bus, students waited to arrive in LA. They visited Medieval Times around 6 p.m. where students saw the reenactments of duels and jousting. While watching the battles food that was served to the audience. Sophomore Trevor Trevino

“It was so fun, I loved the battles and the food was amazing. Probably it was because I was very hungry from traveling all day,” Trevino said. “I loved the environment that I was in, it made me want to become a knight and go battle.”

After the show students arrived at their final destination for the day, WYNDHAM Hotel. Students boarded the bus early at 7 a.m. on their way to Disneyland and California Adventure. Upon their arrival, students dispersed into small groups and visited different rides in the amusement parks.

I loved getting to try the authentic southern food in New Orleans Square. I had never tasted American food from the south. My favorite food was the authentic Gumbo. It had chicken, shrimp, and sausage with a creamy sauce all over rice. I want to try to find a restaurant that has this type food back in Fresno. –Junior Olivia Tandajaja

One of the most popular rides of the day was the new Cars ride. Senior Andrew Guthrie rode the Cars ride for the first time, and was impressed by the roller coaster type thrill ride and the layout.

“When we first got to Disneyland, and I saw a group of people headed over to Cars Land, I wanted follow them since I’ve never been on the ride before,” Guthrie said. “People had told me it was a really fun ride but it wasn’t until I saw it firsthand that I could truly appreciate it. I loved how you drove through the different rooms leading up to the race, but my favorite part of the ride was of course was the race itself.”

With a variety of different restaurants around the parks, foods from Asian, to South American, European were all available to students. Junior Olivia Tandajaja enjoyed foods from the south the most.

“I loved getting to try the authentic southern food in New Orleans Square,” Tandajaja said. “I had never tasted American food from the south. My favorite food was the authentic Gumbo. It had chicken, shrimp, and sausage with a creamy sauce all over rice. I want to try to find a restaurant that has this type food back in Fresno.”

Vice President of Heritage Festival Kyle Naylor discusses the effectiveness of the Heritage Music Festival

The following day band and choir had separate because of different of their different venue locations. Band had to be on their stage at 8:30 a.m., while choir had to arrive a little later, around 10 a.m. Band practiced through their songs before the actual performance.

After performing several songs, the band was adjudicated by three judges. Not all three spoke to the band, only one judge went up on stage with a given time of four minutes to critique the band.

After band had finished the performance they went out into the lobby where choir had arrived a short while before. The members of the band changed into more comfortable clothes to prepare for the second day of Disneyland, while choir began practicing for their upcoming performance.

After both the choir and band had finished their performances, everyone packed up and were ready to visit Disneyland one last time. Unlike the previous day where students were given bouncer tickets to which they could go to Disneyland and California Adventure, students could only wander in Disneyland.

One group had to wait an hour and ten minutes to board Space Mountain, but this provided opportunities for students to converse and learn new things about their peers outside of school. Senior Anthony Zhang had never been to Disneyland before. One of the things he disliked about Disneyland was definitely the wait for the rides.

“Disneyland was really fun, and I got to see why everyone loves Disneyland so much,” Zhang said. “But one thing I didn’t like was how I had to wait a long time to get on a ride. One ride called Space Mountain we had to wait for an hour and a some minutes. What was nice about you and your friends being stuck in line was that you could talk to them and see what they are like outside of school. I really liked that.”

I am so proud of my students. They have put in a lot of hard work, and many hours of practice. It is so exciting to see their efforts rewarded in such a meaningful way. To achieve a gold star rating as my first year as band director is so exciting, also to have our music program recognized with the sweepstakes reward is a sign of great things to come. –Leslie Bannister, band director

The concert hall, located in Big Thunder Mountain, where the awards took place was very open and no chairs were in visible. Music directors had their own section with chairs, while students sat on the ground with their appropriate schools. The opening ceremony of the awards ceremony began with “Goofy”, “Mickey Mouse”, “Pluto”, and “Daffy Duck” all dancing with a group of singers. After they had done their dance routine a wizard had come on stage to help present the awards with the Vice President of Heritage Kyle Naylor.

Heritage Festival awards, presented by Naylor, honored band and choir, where they earned honors: gold for jazz band and womens ensemble, silver for high school choir and junior high choir. Senior Ivette Ibarra and Guthrie won the maestro awards, and Guthrie also won the “When you Wish” award. The school music program won overall top prize earning the Heritage Sweepstakes Award.

Bannister was proud of her students as well as the Music Department as a whole. While this is only Bannister’s first year as band director, she excited to see how much of the work practicing payed off.

“I am so proud of my students. They have put in a lot of hard work, and many hours of practice,” Bannister said. “It is so exciting to see their efforts rewarded in such a meaningful way. To achieve a gold star rating as my first year as band director is so exciting, also to have our music program recognized with the sweepstakes reward is a sign of great things to come.”

Ainley was astounded by her choir group winning the best overall music program. Along with Bannister, this was also her first year as high school choir director.

“This is my first trip to Heritage as a high school choir teacher and I feel like it was the best possible experience for both teachers and students,” Ainley said. “Winning the sweepstakes trophy literally took my breath away, and I felt so humbled and honored that they would recognize the hard work that all Fresno Christian students do in order to achieve their very best.”

The writer can be reached via Twitter: @KevinGarcha.

For more features, read the March 10 article, Teen dating: The struggle.

By |2015-03-11T00:00:00-07:00March 11th, 2015|FC Arts, Features, Music, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Former campus teacher reflects FC experience

Jason Swain | The Feather Online Archive

After teaching on campus for two years, alumnus Eric Witters, ’04, is now teaching history at Madera South High School.

At the beginning of this school year the FC campus was missing a former campus teacher, campus lifer and graduate (’04) and rambunctious soul: Eric Witters. Witters did not return to the staff for the 2014-’15 school year, instead he was hired at Madera South High School as a history teacher.

The lack of Witters’ impact not only in the classroom but in the hallways and on the basketball court can be felt by many students.

Many of his students are now freshman and have taken what they learned from Witters and incorporated it into their everyday actions in class. Devin Pitts, ’18, expounded upon what he learned from Witters.

“He was able to keep his classes entertained all the time,” Pitts said. “His methods were unusual but effective and thats why I enjoyed his classes so much. Some of the time in class I was in trouble but he helped me learn how to act correctly in a classroom.”

Even though many hope and pray for the return of “King Eric” their dreams will most likely never be realized. In today’s age of over staffed schools, Witters is a thankful for having a job at the moment.

“I will most likely stay in the public school system,” Witters said. “The job market is very sparse and it is not easy to pick and choose what schools you would like to teach at.”

Witters has gained recognition within his new school for being an innovative teacher. His incorporation of Apple devices and electronically studied material have set him apart from other teachers.

“Many of the techniques that I implement are ones that I learned while teaching at FC,” Witters said. “I value the two year experience in teaching that I had at FC and all of the great people that I learned from.”

Someone fit to judge the innovativeness of very different schools and cultures is Witters, he has taught at very diverse schools such as Kings Canyon Junior High School, FC and now Madera South High School.

Every school has the same goal, to educate their students and create well rounded individuals.

“Larger schools are just the same as small schools,” Witters said. “We are all trying to find the best way to motivate the students and develop tomorrow’s leaders.”

Without the guidance and teaching of dedicated individuals our future would be a bleak one. The motivation to help others become more than they ever dreamed of is what keeps Witters going, it is what he lives for.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @2015_Beal.

For more features, read the March 3 article, WWII Veteran receives long awaited medal.

By |2015-03-06T00:00:00-07:00March 6th, 2015|Features, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Teen dating: The struggle

IMG_4824Jason Swain | The Feather Online Archive

Communicating directly with a partner during a relationship is a key in avoiding violence in teen dating.

This is the first of a three-part series about teen dating written by various Feather staff members.

President Barrack Obama named February National Teen Dating and Violence Awareness month, 2015 is the first year the month has been declared.

The reason for awareness of violence in teen dating is of course the volatility of the teenage mind but also the alarming statistics recently gathered by multiple sources.

A nationwide study about Teen Dating Violence revealed one in five girls and one in 10 boys said they had experienced teen dating violence (TDV) in the previous year, and often occurred more than once.

The common opinion on TDV is that only female teens are the receivers of violence, this is far from the truth as Kevin Vagi from the Center for Disease Control expounds upon.

“While female students have a higher prevalence than male students, male and female students are both impacted by teen dating violence,” said Vagi. “Prevention efforts may be more effective if they include content for both sexes.”

Connecting TDV to other problems in teen life such as suicidal behavior, depression or substance abuse is a tricky thing. Studying the affects of the dating life on other parts of teen behavior is nearly impossible due to the amount of other stimuli.

A key factor in violent behavior of all ages is stress, it affects middle aged men and women, elderly folks and teenagers.

While female students have a higher prevalence than male students, male and female students are both impacted by teen dating violence. Prevention efforts may be more effective if they include content for both sexes. –Kevin Vagi, Center for Disease Control 

All relationship are different; some catalysts to violence in a relationship are issues of power and control. Violent words and actions are tactics that an abusive partner uses to gain and maintain power and control over another person.

In high school peers that a partner will undoubtedly come in contact with is often a source of conflict. Many times one partner will not actively search for companionship from another student but rather come upon it by happenstance, leading the third party to believe the newly generated relationship is copacetic and normal.

Now the couple has arrived at a cross roads where jealousy and anger enter the relationship and seed the beginnings of violence. Control also enters at this point: one member of the relationship tries to monitor and control the others life and interaction with others, often sowing the seed of violence.

In American society sex has been popularized through different mediums such as TV shows, movies, music and increasingly accessible pornography. The road to purity is tougher now but that is no excuse for violence or immorality projected towards another human being. –Passport to Purity

The point of this series is to shed light on violence and relationships, and in the opinions of many behavioral experts, education is the best way to create healthy relationships. That is why President Obama proclaimed February 2015 National Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month, in hopes of raising awareness and educating teens about the natural pitfalls of dating at their age.

Thankfully many resources exist to help educate teens on healthy and productive relationships. One prevalent resource in the fight against impurity is Passport to Purity. P2P offers an in depth and interactive path to purity and copacetic relationships by teaching about the best ways to interact romantically with others.

The teachings emphasize the fact that once you enter into a relationship, either sexual or non sexual, you can never be the same afterwards, even using the term “damaged goods.” Many feel that the teachings in P2P are extreme in the way that they do not allow for full restoration and demean those who have made mistakes.

In our society sex has been popularized through different mediums such as TV shows, movies, music and increasingly accessible pornography. The road to purity is tougher now but that is no excuse for violence or immorality projected towards another human being.

Directly communicating with a partner during a relationship is a key in avoiding violence. If there are no established boundaries then both parties are subject to misinterpretation and even allegations of rape after the fact.

In the next installment of teen dating, the struggle, we will examine the risks and rewards of teen relationships.

For more information, read Teen sex prevented by parental involvement

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather and Instagram @thefeatheronline. The writer can be reached via Twitter @Beal2015.

For more features, read the March 5 article, Children’s Hospital drives Central Valley to volunteer towards cause (VIDEO, SLIDESHOW, PODCAST).

By |2015-03-06T00:00:00-07:00March 6th, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|5 Comments

BRIEF: Sleep Awareness Week’s sleep routine (PODCAST)

SleepAwarenessWeekhttp://sleepfoundation.org

This week has marked the annual Sleep Awareness Week in America, March 2-8, 2015.

This week has marked the annual Sleep Awareness Week in America, March 2-8. The implementation of this week into the national calendar is a testament to the importance of a proper sleep schedule.

Lack of sleep can cause many complications in one’s everyday routine. Just a few of these complications include slow brain function, lack of physical energy and, God-forbid, falling asleep at the wheel.

It is can be generally assumed that the older teens get, the less sleep is needed. Age, weight and other physical attributes factor into the exact amount you need, but the average number of hours an adult needs to sleep in order to have a smoothly functioning day is nine.

There are a few activities teens can add into the daily routine if they are having trouble sleeping that will help relax their body, granting a more sound state of rest.

Exercising on a daily basis with a proper diet can make it easier to fall asleep. If teens exercise routinely, though, use caution and make sure to not do any strenuous exercise at least three hours before bed, as this will only complicate your sleep efforts.

It is highly recommended that you try to avoid caffeine, at least in the afternoon, as this spikes energy levels. Also finishing your day off with a hot bath with salts can bring a great amount of inner peace before bedtime.

There are 25 more random acts of sleep routines that can help you reach comatose every night like clock work, but if you follow these few steps, you will be on the fast track to a deeper, more fulfilling sleep.

Make sure to keep the importance of sleep awareness in mind next time you or a friend is sleep deprived.

For more information on the importance of healthy sleep patterns, make sure to check out the Jan. 15 article, Student sleep triggers attentiveness, learning.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @namoodnhoj.

By |2015-03-06T00:00:00-07:00March 6th, 2015|Features, Podcasts, Podcasts 2014-15, Uncategorized|1 Comment

Childrens Hospital drives central Valley volunteers (UPDATE, VIDEO, SLIDESHOW, PODCAST)

KidsDay1Kylie Bell

Feather adviser Greg Stobbe hawks special edition Kids Day newspapers with Fresno Mayor Ashley Swearengin, March 3.

Feather staff joins student leadership to hawk special Fresno Bee Kids Day papers

UPDATE: March. 11
After an estimate was given, March 3, for Kids Day, Valley Children’s Hospital was able to count the remainder of the money raised with a total of $535,000. Last year’s Kids Day reached a total of $480,000, which set a record for future fundraising. While this is not the total final count, Children’s Hospital has passed the goal for this year’s Kids Day reaching over the estimated $530,000.

Each year, the community, Fresno Bee and ABC 30 all join forces to earn money for the patients of Valley Children’s Hospital. For the 28th time, Kids Day has encouraged hundreds of individuals to take time selling special edition Fresno Bee newspapers across the San Joaquin Valley to earn the money to help the cause, March 3.

Community members and campus students including notable figures and organizations from Mayor Ashley Swearengin, Police Chief Jerry Dyer, and Fresno State football coach Tim DeRuyter to student leadership and publications from FC.

This year, according to the Fresno Bee: an estimated amount of $340,500 and counting, has been provided at the time of 5 p.m., March 3. Children’s Hospital spokeswoman Zara Arboleda has stated this year’s goal of $530,000 is reachable.

Since last year, Children’s Hospital has received over $6.3 million in donations throughout the course of its 28 year history. This year they hope to pass $7 million in an even greater effort to support the patients of the Madera County hospital.

Celebrity corner encourages notable figures from the community to volunteer

With the increase of involvement of a local whose who, Kids Day volunteers have deemed the corner of Blackstone and Shaw “celebrity corner”. Many notable figures from the community, as well as ABC 30 and the Fresno Bee, have used this corner to sell their newspapers for the last seven to eight years.

From the start of Kids Day, Fresno Bee has partnered with Valley Children’s Hospital. Each year they prepare these special edition newspapers for hundreds of individuals to sell. Fresno Bee Executive Editor Jim Boren has been apart of Kids Day since it’s beginnings. He really enjoys the chance the chance to help raise money for the hospital and thinks of the event as a symbol for the community.

“Well, Kids Day for one, raises a lot of money for the hospital, and does a lot of good things, but it’s also a symbolism of how important Valley Children’s Hospital is to our community,” Boren said. “This is a hospital that really cares for kids almost all of us have had either a child or a relative who has gone through that hospital and it does great work and we are just out here to help.”

Boren adds that the vision of Kids Day is expanding through the years. Along with just Fresno, efforts have been raised all across the San Joaquin Valley, including cities like Visalia and the youth of the community.

“More and more people are getting involved, we expanded across the Valley,” Boren said. “Visalia is a huge part of Kids Day, they do great work down their, especially in the high schools. So it’s expanded. This hospital has served the entire San Joaquin Valley and over the central coast, so it is an important part of the whole region.”

I have never been to this (Kids Day), and so it’s really nice seeing all these people trying to support us. Think about it this way: you are going to save a life, just by a dollar, you know, maybe fifty cents. You could spend five, ten dollars on something else, something you don’t even use. So you can make a difference with just a little bit of money. –-Juan Mendez, father of Neymar Mendez, 2015 Kids Day ambassador child

ABC 30 has also partnered with Children’s Hospital, along with the Fresno Bee, to broadcast Kids Day all day long, promoting the event. ABC 30 news reporter Amanda Venegas has estimated the volunteers of the event to over 5,000. Using the hashtag #KidsDay2015, people could promote over social media, which Venegas thinks has helped the event.

“If I could have all of our reporters out showcasing the different locations that would be really neat,” Venegas said. “But we just showcase different areas of Fresno that we can make it out to. Besides the dozens of people you see here, there is about 5,300 volunteers all over the County, like in Visalia and Merced. There is people even in the Oakhurst area that are selling newspapers right now that you don’t see. And I think social media has been huge because we can actually see what people are doing and we don’t have to be there.”

Valley Children’s Hospital Ambassador Family was able to come to support Kids Day and encourage others to donate to the cause. Juan Mendez, father of Neymar Mendez, the ambassador child, was excited to see the involvement the community offered during Kids Day and the chance to see others give their time and money for the cause.

“I have never been to this (Kids Day), and so it’s really nice seeing all these people trying to support us,” Mendez said. “Think about it this way: you are going to save a life, just by a dollar, you know, maybe fifty cents. You could spend five, ten dollars on something else, something you don’t even use. So you can make a difference with just a little bit of money.”

President and CEO of Valley Children’s Hospital Todd Suntrapak echoes Mendez’ sentiments.

President and CEO of Valley Children’s Hospital Todd Suntrapak, who was born and raised in Fresno, participated in Kids Day as well. As once a patient of Children’s Hospital, Suntrapak thinks of this event as a way to help out the children of the San Joaquin Valley.

“It’s the least I can do to take my time and come out here and thank all the terrific volunteers that are working on our behalf today,” Suntrapak said. “But more importantly on behalf of making kids well, I mean really, that’s what essentially is happening here. All these volunteers are donating their time and selling papers in partnership with ABC 30 and the Fresno Bee at the end to really a child. It’s my pleasure to be here; I wouldn’t miss it.”

Mayor Ashley Swearengin has been selling newspapers on ‘celebrity corner’ since it’s start. With other notable figures, Swearengin adds that it all comes back to help the patients.

“Every year it just gets more and more exciting,” Swearengin said. “More and more people are here, we have students from Fresno State and athletic coaches. We’ve got our law enforcement leaders other elected officials and people are out here for the same reason: to help Childrens Hospital.”

Campus works with San Joaquin Valley to sell newspapers

Student leadership, began selling newspaper at a dim and chilly 4 a.m., along with The Feather staff who came just about 45 minutes later to corners at Alluvial and Cedar as well as Cedar and Alluvial. For several years now both campus clubs have participated in Kids Day to help Valley Children’s Hospital.

With a total amount of 980 newspapers sold, campus representatives were able to contribute $1,954.13 to the cause. Students were able to sell all the way till 9 a.m., where they then headed to their classes for the day.

Senior John Dooman has been participating in Kids Day for three years. While he did not sell as many newspapers as he expected, selling one encouraged him to appreciate his time during the day.

“This year I was a little late waking up, but I was glad that I could make it to Kids Day,” Dooman said. “Even though I didn’t sell a crazy amount of newspapers, the chance to even sell one is enough to help a child in need. No matter how early it was, I’m happy I went.”

Freshman Jaden Ventura has never been part of Kids Day till this year. As a member of The Feather he was able to be encouraged by the community around him as they donated thousands of dollars to the cause.

“I remember that I was on the corner and someone gave $20 for a paper and it made me realize that people really do care about Kids Day,” Ventura said. “Being able to help be apart of such a noble cause really made the entire day worth it.”

Opinions Editor Rees Roggenstein, also contributed to this article.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @rynnking_.

For more on Kids Day 2015, read the Fresno Bee articles, A look back at Kids Day 2015: from celebrity corner to students in Oakhurst and Fresno’s Mendez family stays strong despite child’s medical battles.

For more features, read the March 3 article, WWII Veteran receives long awaited medal.

Armenian artist reflects on genocide, homeland culture

P1090795_FotorMichael Fu

Original Armenian sculptures and paintings are displayed at the new exhibit at the Fresno Art Museum. Including pieces from Arminee Shishmanian.

Fresno Art Museum displays Armenian Genocide art

Fresno Art Museum currently features an emotionally moving and historically important exhibition to commemorate the 100th year anniversary of the Armenian Genocide. Named “1915-2015: Tradition, Legacy, Culture“, the exhibit reflects the the very first massacre in the 20th century.

All of the exhibit art pi