Student of the Month: Mariana Fikse

IMG_2320Alexis Kalugin | The Feather Online Archive

While freshman Mariana Fikse enjoys horseback riding, she is also playing varsity tennis and basketball.

Every month The Feather will highlight one student recommended by a teacher and voted upon by Feather staff members. Students are chosen depending upon several factors including and not limited to good grades, class engagement, positive attitude and special extracurricular activities.

Due to the Feather’s upgrade period during the end of March and April both a Male and Female student have been selected for the month of May.

May’s female student of the Month is Mariana Fikse, ’16, chosen by mathematics teacher, Jared Kaiser for her focus and curiosity in the materials.

“Mariana is a student who knows what it means to be an Eagle,” Kaiser said. “She is always willing to help her fellow classmates and is always on task wanting to learn more.”

Fikse first joined the FC community at the start of the 2014-15 school year after attending Cross Road Christian in Madera throughout elementary and junior high. Since her arrival, Fiske has kept exemplary grades as well as joined both the varsity basketball and tennis team.

“Mariana is a student who knows what it means to be an Eagle. She is always willing to help her fellow classmates and is always on task wanting to learn more.” –Jared Kaiser, mathematics teacher

Sports and athleticism comes naturally to Fikse who spends much of her free time outdoors or riding quads at the track behind her family’s dairy (located in Madera). As a first-year tennis player, Fikse says that she originally joined tennis for the team aspect however soon began to enjoy the sport as well.

“It’s a fun sport that you can play with almost anyone,” Fikse said. “There isn’t so much pressure because it is an individual sport so you learn at your own pace.  I first tried tennis because I didn’t know anyone at the school and I thought it would be a good way to get to know some people. But as the season went on I began to really enjoy tennis.”

She first started basketball at Crossroads in the 5th grade and has continued to build and hone in her skills since, as a freshmen on FC’s varsity level.

Team mate Olivia Tandadjaja, ’16, says that Fikse served as a vital member of this year’s girl’s basketball program as well as being a supportive teammate and friend.

“Mariana has such a positive attitude and always gives her all,” Tandadjaja said. “She definitely makes the most baskets in our team from her three-point-shots. She is also really funny and great to be around.”
Fiske hopes to help strengthen the girl’s program throughout the next three years and develop close bonds with her team mates.

“My favorite part is just being on a team and having fun and getting to learn the sport better,” Fikse said. “My hopes for next season are that we win more games and make it to the playoffs. I think next year we will be good enough to compete with a lot of teams.”

When not outdoors or practicing for tennis or basketball Fikse often plays the piano which she learned as a 1st grader. She still continues to take regular lesson and performs at recitals an average of twice a year.
Fikse has attended Cornerstone Community church is Chowchilla throughout her life and plans to become involved with the youth group over the summer.

Fikse wants to discover her future career by taking the classes that interest her. Though she is not yet certain about the exact path, Fikse considers a career in agriculture due to the significant role the family farm played in her childhood. Fikse accredits farming with her strong work ethic and with the appreciation of values and integrity.

“In the summer I work in our office and sometimes I will help my Dad with vet checks on Wednesday,” Fikse said. “It (farming) definitely makes you appreciate hard work and not take things for granted. I definitely would want to stay in agriculture. It’s like my life, I love it and I have never known anything different I guess.”

Friend Jenna Bynum says that Fikse is generally quiet but extremely caring and loyal.

“She’s quiet, funny, nice and caring,” Bynum said. “She’s just an overall awesome friend.”

Mother, Marie Fikse describes her daughter as focused and compassionate. Both parents want Mariana to stay strong in her faith and continue to pursue her interests and dreams.

“Mariana is a sincere and kind person,” Marie said. “She cares about others and has a sweet personality. She is humble and honest and works hard at whatever she does. She is a self-motivated person, she wants to do things right. She works hard and doesn’t give up easily. I see leadership qualities in her and a lot of perseverance. We pray that she will continue to grow in The Lord and seek Him first and His will for her life. Mariana brings joy and fun to our family everyday and we are proud of her and love her.”

Interesting facts about Mariana Fikse

• If Fiske was an animal she would be a bird so that she could fly.
• Her favorite food is Pizza
• If Fikse could have any superpower it would be super speed.
• Her favorite restaurant would either by California Pizza Kitchen or In n Out.
• She listens to Christian and Country music.
• She has four Labrador retrievers.
• When Fikse was in elementary school she read and re-read the Narnia Series multiple times.
• Her favorite subject is history because she likes to learn about how the modern connects with the past.

For last month’s Student of The Month, view Student of the Month: Roman Endicott.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @skylerklee.

By |2015-05-08T12:35:36+00:00May 8th, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Fresno Fire Dept. icon: Bill Phillips

150914-bill-phillips-ffd-004Jason Swain | The Feather Online Archive

Staffer Trevor Beal interviews Bill Phillips about his life and stories from his service in the Fresno Fire Department.

The Fresno Fire Department, known for its continued community support would not have nearly as much public attention if it were not for the past efforts of men similar to Bill Phillips. Phillips, former Fresno firefighter, has taken on many tasks in his lifetime to help support the Fresno Fire Department.

Phillips, at the age of 85, has been a part of one of the greatest technologically innovative periods in fire fighting history. Over the course of his 36 year career, Phillips encountered nearly every fire fighting situation possible, from brush to electrical fires.

Though he is highly respected for his valiant undertakings throughout his career, Phillips most recognized accomplishments were his efforts to preserve the rich history of the Fresno Fire Departments and other nearby departments. From old photographs to the restoration of decommissioned fire engines, Phillips has developed a passion for the preservation of local artifacts.

In conjunction with Phillips fire service he is also a veteran of the Korean War. Upon his return from the battlefield, he went to work at Hammer Field, now known as Fresno Air Terminal. At the air field Phillips worked on and repaired battle damaged aircraft.

In 1955, Hammer field closed down, leaving 3,000 employees, including Phillips, without a job. Desperate for work, Phillips signed up to take a test administered by the fire department. Out of 3,000 applicants who took the test only the top ten highest scores were accepted; Phillips finished 9th. 1955 marked the beginning of Phillips fire fighting career.

“The first fire that I ever responded to was a car fire in Fresno,” Phillips said. “I was stationed at San Pablo and Divisadero, I spent a full year there and enjoyed every second of it.”

Phillips explained the differences in procedures at the beginning of his career compared to the end. In the early days of his career, two fire rigs were required in order to fully extinguish a fire. A pumper and a hose wagon were the optimum rigs.

The response time of the Fresno Fire Department in 1955 varied according to the location of the call.
“We were required to be completely dressed and ready in 60 seconds,” Phillips said. “It didn’t matter if we were asleep, in the shower, or using the restroom we had to get ready real quick. The city was a lot smaller when I was working, the rigs weren’t quite as fast, but we still made it to the scene quickly because of our close proximity.”

 In recent years, procedures have changed, making the response times more efficient. However, the fire department 60 years ago could respond to fires quicker, strictly due to the size of the city.

Ever since the tragedy of 9/11, the brotherly bond among firefighters has become much more evident. Phillips explained how he has witnessed this “unbreakable” bond with his own eyes.

“Firefighters, no matter what station, city, state or sometimes even country, are like a brotherhood,” Phillips said. “Just look at the recent tragedy with Captain (Pete) Dern, there are fire stations in other countries with posters promoting his recovery. There was once this man on this job named Harvey. He became paralyzed, so the firefighters signed up to take his shifts so that his family could continue to receive financial support. They worked for that man for one whole year, for no compensation at all, until they convinced to police department to hire him for a desk job. This is just one of many examples where I have witnessed this seemingly unbreakable bond that connects us firefighters.”

Phillips first efforts to preserve local history began when he was on a fire call one-quarter mile away from the fire station. He explained how this specific fire would give him the opportunity to save thousands of photographs.

“We could see the fire from the fire station just West of us,” Phillips said. “When we got there we saw that it was a huge, beautiful home that had gone up in flames. We attacked the fire, put it out and then began our overhaul, which involves opening up walls, ceilings and other parts of the house to check for fire extensions.

“It was during overhaul that we realized that the house was the former residence of world famous photographer, Claude Laval, who had already passed on. We discovered a full basement under that house which served as Laval’s laboratory. I took on the responsibility of salvaging all the negatives that survived the fire and called some people to help that owed me, including the curator of Kearney Mansion and two other firefighters. We stored the photos in a huge warehouse until years later, Mr. Edwin M. Eaton, who started Guarantee Savings and Loans, took many of the pictures out and printed a book called Vintage Fresno.”

Phillips was later award by both the Fresno Fire Department and the Laval family for the good deeds he had done for the city and efforts to preserve its history.

Since then, Phillips has taken on many other responsibilities, chiefly the restoration and preservation of Fresno Fire Department relics. Phillips began his restorative hobby when he was young and learned of old equipment that was set to be sold for scrap.

 He could not stand the thought of allowing precious and historic pieces of the department be thrown away, Phillips and some of his colleagues discussed with city hall his plans for restoration and they were approved.

The city sold Phillips a 1917 seagraves pumper in 1959 and his restorative career began.

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150914-bill-phillips-ffd-002 (1)Jason Swain | The Feather Online Archive

“I fired it up in front the shop at E street and Fresno street and drove it all the way home.” Phillips said. “She drove just fine all the way to my house and when I got home I parked her on my patio. The process of restoring a rig is different for every person, but I began by disassembling the rig down to the frame and sand blasting all the worn paint off. With the help of some people that I knew in town I painted the rig, placed the seats in her then learned how to do gold leafing, I did it all myself and I think I did a pretty good job.”

Phillips is the epitome of a conservationist, not in the environmental world but in the City of Fresno. He has worked countless hours to perfect his craft, he put in so much effort not because he sought out personal gain or glory but because he wanted to educate future generations on our societies progress and innovations.
Phillips said he is thankful for everything he learned at the Fire Department, both in labor and intellect. He was immersed in the departments culture for years and repaid the department by preserving and protecting its cherished history.
By |2015-05-02T11:34:31+00:00May 2nd, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Student of the Month: William Liao

IMG_9953 | The Feather Online Archive
Every month The Feather will highlight one student recommended by a teacher and voted upon by Feather staff members. Students are chosen depending upon several factors including and not limited to good grades, class engagement, positive attitude and special extracurricular activities.
Due to the Feather’s upgrade period during the end of March and throughout April both a Male and Female student have been selected for the month of May.

May’s male student of the Month is William Liao, ’16, chosen by school secretary, Michelle Warkentin for his genuine character and attention to detail.

“I think William should be student of the month because lately I’ve seen him being kind to the students,” Warkentin said. “He’s always very helpful and very polite when he comes into the office and he will ask if I need any help or those sorts of things. He always wants to make sure things are very clear and so I think that he needs to be honored for those things.”

Liao first attended FC in seventh grade after spending his elementary years at Maple Creek and as a homeschooled student.

This year Liao decided to join the drama department. The first year actor soon deemed the program his favorite class. He participated in Fc’s 2015 production of Music Man as part of the ensemble. Liao says that the best part about drama is learning to recite lines in various ways.

“I’m in drama for the first time so I’m enjoying that,” Liao said. “I thought it would be a fun class to join and since they were doing the music man, a famous play, I thought it would be fun to be in it. My favorite part about drama is getting to learn how to say lines differently and in different tones and getting to do all of the fun scenes in the play.”

I think William should be student of the month because lately I’ve seen him being kind to the students. He’s always very helpful and very polite when he comes into the office and he will ask if I need any help or those sorts of things. He always wants to make sure things are very clear and so I think that he needs to be honored for those things.” –Michelle Warkentin, academic advisor 

In addition to drama, Liao has played tennis with FC since freshmen year. The junior athletes’ persistence throughout the last two years has led in part to Fc’s impeccable record in the 2015 season.

“I have enjoyed playing tennis ever since my freshmen year,” Liao said. “Tennis has been going well so far. So far so good. This is the best year we have had; Fresno Christian has not lost any games this year.”

Teammate Andrew Moore,’16 says that Liao displays exceptional positivity and focus in each match.
“Will always puts out 100% effort each match,” Moor said. “It inspires the rest of us to play harder as well. He’s an encourager to the rest of us.”

On Liao’s free time he enjoys playing video games, watching movies with friends or simply spending some quiet time relaxing. Liao says that due to sports and academics, he often does not have the opportunity for much down time.

“I do consider myself really busy,” Liao said. “I manage my time well and sometimes I would have free time to relax but there are times when I am super busy and sometimes I don’t have time to relax. When I do, I surf the internet, play video games and sometimes listen to music.”

In the future Liao plans to pursue a profession in computer science. He recognizes the growing need for technological support and finds the study of computers interesting.

“Technology is taking over now days,” Liao said. “I thought it would be a good field to go into since pretty much every career is using technology and it makes good money. Also it is fascinating.”

Friend Nathan Wong attends the same church as Liao and sang alongside him in Music man’s ensemble. Wong describes Liao as a quiet and kind person.

“We were friends since the day I came here,” Wong said. “He goes to my church and that’s where I think I first met him. I would say that as far as personality he is very quiet and shy. However he is also a really nice person.”

Father Daniel Liao says that the family’s ultimate goal for Will is that he would remain strong in faith and develop the leadership qualities of a man after God’s own heart.

“Our number one hope is that he is close to Christ,” Liao said. “This trumps all other desires.
For his career we pray that he finds his passion and gift that God has given him and use it to be a productive citizen. We have always told him that our job as parents is to prepare him to be the best husband, father and/or uncle so long as God wills it. He knows that eventually he will be the man of the house and we hope that he is a Christ-centered leader of his household.”

Interesting Facts about William Liao
• His favorite book is the Harry Potter Series (he has read all seven of them!)
• Liao’s favorite movie is alien vs. predator.
• Liao has a Boston terrier and a tortoise that he got in the 1st grade.
• Liao attends church and Youth group at Fresno Chinese Gospel Church.
• If Liao could have any super power it would be super strength. He would use it to fight off criminals.
• Liao’s favorite restaurant is Red Lobster and his favorite food is orange chicken.
• Liao’s favorite video game is Super Mario Bros Wii.
• He often enjoys listening to Christian and Classical Music.

For a previous student of the month article read Student of the Month: Villanueba pursues passion for animal science, values relationships.

Follow The Feather via Twitter and Instagram: @thefeather and @thefeatheronlilne. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @skylerklee.

By |2015-04-03T12:31:08+00:00April 3rd, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Fresno State hosts Armenian Centennial Concert

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Dance Medley of Armenian Dances began with male dancers with Armenian cultural clothing and later introduced the female dancers onto the stage.

Evening of dance, music in memory of Armenian genocide

As 2015 marks the 100th year of the Armenian Genocide, various of events are planned to commemorate this tragedy. One of which is the Armenian Genocide Centennial Concert on March 8 at Fresno State.

This unique event gather the dancing groups Hamazkayin Niari Dance Ensemble, The Chookasian Armenian Concert Ensemble along with hundreds of descendants of survivors from the Armenian Genocide. The commemoration was separated to several parts which included two speeches celebrating the survival from the hand of the Ottoman Empire.

The Armenian Centennial Concert included ensemble and dancing groups as they performed several different songs represent various parts of the Armenian history. From the male dances to impress females to the wedding dance, from the escape of the Turkish to the desperation of the existence of God, and the age-old song written by Harutyun Syatian in 18th centuries to a brand new song written in 21st centuries encouraging the young generation, the concert has shown numerous cultures of the Armenian.

Founders of the Chookasian Armenian Concert Ensemble, John and Barbara Chookasian started the program in 1994. With the goal to perform traditional yet rarely heard music, John and Barbara along with six other multi-award artists performed over 15 songs in the concert. Many of the performances were folkloric which were played in several different timeline.

Few of the performances stood out the most were “Khossek Hayastani Lerner”–Speak of the Armenian mountains, “Garno Sharjoum”–The Call (to arms) has sounded, and the “Armenian Folk Song Medley”.

Khosseck Hayastani Lerner, song sang by Barbara, is a blue folkloric described the separation of the young, the family and the mother who was forced to leave her child and home. Part of the lyrics describes an Armenian mother desperately wanting to know the news of her homeland and the miserable sadness of her losing her son. Throughout the song, words “Ararat” was mention multiple times, which is the name of the mountain where the song was written. Armenian had been living on the mountain for generation, but during the genocide, Turkish took over the mountain along with many others.

The Armenian Centennial Concert is a great success. Although myself do not relate to any Armenian, I could definintely feel the struggles and all the desperation of the Armenian. As a person who enjoy art and music, I can not express the emotion on many of the elders faces when the first song was sang. It was so emotional and so comforting at the same time. It seems like after hundred of years of suppressing anger and lost of family is now first being relief. –Junior Feather staffer Michael Fu

Garno Sharjoum is a nationalistic song of the historic uprising in Province of Erzrum during the Armenian Genocide. Even though facing with great treats and risking their own lives fought against Turkish, many of the Armenian got united and stood against the rival power. This song provided a powerful message uplift the hearts of many Armenian people and given them strength to endure through the Genocide.

One of the notable song performed by Hayka Nalbandyan with saz, a traditional Armenian double-bodied lute. Played like a guitar, lute is also called bazouk. The instrument can cover large range of area. The song was origin from the folk dance. This medley is quick yet simple allowed many quickly immerse into the music.

Beside performing music and singing, the concert also invited dance group from L.A., Hamazkayin Valley Chapter Niari Dance Group was found in 2000 with 27 dancers, it now has over hundred of dancers. From aged of 5 to 28 years old, over 30 dancers participate in the centennial concert here at Fresno State.

Dance Medley of Armenian Dances performed by many of the dancers was a joyful performance. Four male dancers started the dance with Armenian cultural clothing and later introduced the female dancers onto the stage. With quick beat and colorful costumes, they quickly bring the audience to a joyful world.

Oor Aeyir Asdvadz traslate to “Where Were You O’ God?” is also performed by the Hamazkayin dance group. Song wrote by Mesdjian. This is a song of Armenian crying to God asking of where is He. The performance was slow and probably the most broken-hearted to both audiences and all survivors. Wearing purple dresses, a powerful message has sent to many of the outsider. Several eyes were fill with tears.

The concert is a great success. Although myself does not relate to any Armenian, I could definitely feel the struggles and all the desperation of the Armenian. As a person who enjoy art and music, I can not express the emotion on many of the elders faces when the first song was sang. It was so emotional and so comforting at the same time. It seems like after hundred of years of suppressing anger and lost of family is now first being relief.

Outside of the CSUF Satellite Student Union, a genocide monument is currently building right now and will be complete on April 24. Students and families are all welcome to the ceremony.

For more information about Armenian Genocide article and picture check out Armenian Centennial Genocide article in photo section.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @fmichael_0501.

By |2015-03-27T00:00:00+00:00March 27th, 2015|Community Events, Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Student of the Month: Roman Endicott

IMG_7984Every month The Feather will highlight one student recommended by a teacher and voted upon by Feather staff members. Students are chosen depending upon several factors including and not limited to good grades, class engagement, positive attitude and special extracurricular activities.

The student of the month for March is Freshmen Roman Endicott, chosen by Spanish teacher Karen Almaraz. Almaraz says that Endicott has shown a great deal of responsibility, focus and positivity within both the classroom setting and the sport’s field.

“Roman is a wonderful student and athlete,” Almaraz said. “I chose him because I truly appreciate his great work ethic and positive attitude on and off the field. In class, he’s always on time and ready to start. I know I can count on Roman to participate whenever I ask for volunteers to answer a question or read. He is constantly going out of his way to help out his classmates and despite having such a busy schedule with baseball his dedication to his studies is outstanding.”

Endicott is a “lifer” at FC. This year he has taken part in two seasonal FC sports, showed dedication in the academic sphere and is a first year member of the California Scholastic Federation (CSF).

Endicott has been a member of FC’s baseball and football program for several years and fills most of his weekday afternoons with team practices. Though Roman enjoys athletics he says that the most beneficial part of participating in a team is forming close bonds with others.

“I like sports because a lot of the friendships I have developed over the years have been a result of them and I wouldn?t have those bonds with people that are really close to me without them,” Endicott said. “I feel like the biggest part of it to me is the people that play the sport not necessarily the sport itself.”

Junior teammate Bailey Brogan says that through the short time that Endicott has spent on the team he has displayed a strong work ethic and good sportsmanship.

“Roman is a valuable member of the team,” Brogan said. “He has a good work ethic and a drive to improve on his skills. As a freshman he is very talented for his age and I can’t wait to see what the future has in store for him.”

“We would describe Roman’s personality as friendly, easy-going, funny, smart, hard working and kind. Roman has a strong work ethic. He is disciplined and works hard, especially with his school work and athletics. Our hopes for Roman’s future is that he will always have the same sincere heart he has right now and will follow God’s leading.” Jennifer Endicott, Roman’s mom

After a long week of balancing sports and school work Endicott values a bit of downtime with friends and family in order to refresh himself. He says that though being productive is healthy, spending quality time with others is of the utmost importance.

“I hardly find time during the week (to relax) but during the weekend I find time to just relax with friends and family,” Endicott said. “I feel like if I spend a weekend without catching up with my parents or hanging out with my friends then I really didn’t get anything accomplished and it wasn’t fun at all.”

In addition to academics, sports, and making quality time for family, friends and relaxation, Endicott often aids his grandfather in taking care of his property. He also attends youth group at Bethany Church after practice when he is able.

Mother Jennifer Endicott says that her son is driven, intelligent and caring. She and her husband hope that Roman will continue to steadfastly uphold these qualities throughout his life.

“We would describe Roman’s personality as friendly, easy-going, funny, smart, hard working and kind,” Jennifer said. “Roman has a strong work ethic. He is disciplined and works hard, especially with his school work and athletics. Our hopes for Roman’s future is that he will always have the same sincere heart he has right now and will follow God’s leading. Roman is a wonderful son, brother and friend and we feel so blessed to have him in our family.”

In the distant future, Endicott plans on pursing a profession in the medical field due to his interest in science and passion for helping others

“I plan to hopefully go into something in the medical field because it has always interested me,” Endicott said. “Probably working with people in surgery or being a doctor. Science is my favorite subject and I feel like there’s a lot of different things that you can learn about. It’s just really interesting.”

Though still a freshmen Endicott has expressed interest in Fresno Pacific College.

Erin Wilson, ’18, says that Endicott displays both a humorous and a caring personality.

“He?s smart and he’s nice most of the time,” Wilson said laughing. “He’s also funny. He has a good personality. He cares about people and likes helping them too which is really good.”

Interesting Facts about Roman Endicott

-If Endicott could visit anywhere in the world it would be New Zealand because of the beautiful landscape.
– Endicott is the tallest person in his family.
-Endicott’s favorite fast food restaurant is In and Out
– If Roman had to eat one food for the rest of his life it would be Chile Cheese Dogs.
– His favorite animal is a Red Panda.
-His favorite TV show is The Office
– Endicott’s favorite video game is Madden NFL50
– If Endicott could have any super power it would be invisibility because he could do anything and have fun messing with people.

Follow the Feather via Instagram and Twitter: @thefeather and @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @skylerklee.

For February’s Student of the month article, read, Student of the Month: Villanueba pursues passion for animal science, values relationships.

By |2015-03-26T00:00:00+00:00March 26th, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Yosemite preserves adventure, history

Yosemite1Yosemite National Park has a way of making first time visitors feel like old friends. The beautiful landscape that is Yosemite has been changing the hearts and eyes of its visitors for thousands of years. Some would describe the place as The Incomparable Valley.

I recently visited the Wonder Valley a couple weeks ago with my boyfriend for my birthday celebration. I had not been since I was a little girl, so it was a pleasure seeing it through older eyes of mine.

We tooled around the valley and went wherever our adventurous hearts desired. We took a small hike up to the base of Bridal Veil Falls, walked around meadows, and visited the chapel in the heart of the valley.

Jack Moriarty, student at Clovis Community College, accompanied me on this trip, in fact, it was his idea to go. He shares a bit of why he chose to visit a land so dear to his heart:

“Yosemite is a home for the homeless and a cathedral for the lost. It’s my home,” Moriarty said. “It doesn’t change, but your memories do. So many things in life are moving and changing, but Yosemite is constant. It’s a part of my heart, and so is Kathryn, so why not put those two together and create something wonderful?”

A little side note: there was a journal on a side table where you first walk into the church and it looked like people had been writing in it, so Moriarty and I started reading a few of the things people were writing, and many people from all over the world that had been married in that church, or just visited over the years, and they kept leave messages like, “Ring the bell!” or “We rang the bell! God is good!” So we decided to ring the church bell together and then documented our journey in the little journal on the side table. It was the coolest, most exhilarating thing I had ever been apart of. If you ever get the chance to ring the bell, do it.

History/People:
The Ahwahneechee, one of the seven tribes that are well known today that descend from the original tribes from before the 1800s, lived there for generations; which shortly thereafter followed by European travelers (by horseback or stagecoach) in the mid to late 1800s. In 1907, the railroad from Merced to El Portal made the journey a little more doable for newcomers and visitors, thus increasing population. Each and every day we can uncover new stories told from our ancestors who walked the very steps we know so familiarly.

Yosemite is a home for the homeless and a cathedral for the lost. It’s my home. It doesn’t change, but your memories do. So many things in life are moving and changing, but Yosemite is constant. It’s a part of my heart. — Jack Moriarty, student at Clovis Community College

Places:
Within the history of Yosemite, different variations of communities had thrived in the little big valley and dispersed over many nations, leaving their mark. From early lodging establishments, such as the Wawona Hotel, which gave visitors an archaic setting for when they traveled, to historic miners and their mining sites during the gold rush. Yosemite preserves adventure, history of the region, its peoples and culture.

Stories:
There are details of the Mariposa Battalion entering the Valley of Yosemite in 1851 in recent history books. The result of Euro-Americans coming to the valley meant the removal of the Ahwahneechee native tribe. Travelers in the early years came on foot, horseback, and train. In 1864, President Abraham Lincoln signed a bill granting California the Valley of Yosemite and Mariposa Grove. It was not until 1890 when Yosemite National Park was established.

Collections:
A Yosemite museum flourishes and thrives with remnants of the past and evidence of the valley’s ancestors. More than 4 million items fill its quarters. A research library is maintained with more than 10,00 books relating to the Valley of Yosemite. In recent years, the National Parks Service (NPS) has collected an oral history project of interviews of people’s stories and experiences related to Yosemite.

Preservation:
The NPS is devoted to preserving the Yosemite Valley to honor it’s history and culture and to keep it at its original value throughout the years for visitors, newcomers, and old friends.

Research and Studies:
There is ongoing research about the history of the park. Researchers and land lovers come from all over the world to see what there is to see about the beautiful land that is Yosemite and uncover facts, new and old, for people like us to discover.

There are events coming up in the future, courtesy of the NPS:

Oct. 1, Yosemite will be celebrating 125 years of being a National Park.
Aug. 25, 2016, the NPS turns 100 years old.

Moriarty has visited the National Park of Yosemite four times in the past month, and looks forward to “return home” soon; as do I.

If you have not made it up to Yosemite recently, or at all, I would urge you to take that jump and go. Like all earthly things, it will not be there forever, and neither will we, so why not see all the beauty there is to see in this world while we are still able to?

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @Kamschend.

For more opinions, read the March 24 article, College Corner: Fresno State Standards Changing.

By |2015-03-24T00:00:00+00:00March 24th, 2015|Destinations, Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Get to know: Trevor Beal

Basketball has been a strong passion for Trevor Beal, he began playing in fourth grade and joined the varsity team his freshman year. He has played every position over the years, but his favorite is shooting guard.

Jacobson: How long have you been attending Fresno Christian?

Beal: Since the fourth grade, I came to Fresno Christian from Clovis Christian and it was a big change. Fresno Christian, even though it is small, has many good aspects athletically and academically.

Jacobson: Do you play any sports other than basketball?

Beal: Even though basketball is my favorite sport by far, I also play golf. Golf is a very relaxing sport, but at the same time, very mentally challenging.

Jacobson: What is your favorite part about playing sports?

Beal: Winning games. My least favorite part is of course is losing games, losing is one of the biggest reasons I practice and put in extra work. Playing basketball and golfing have taught me to push myself so that I can win.

Jacobson: What is your favorite Bible verse?

Beal: Probably Jeremiah 29:11. “For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.”

Jacobson: What is your most cherished school memory?

Beal: My favorite memory from Fresno Christian is from my freshman year when our basketball team won the Valley Championship, and continued on to the second round of the State Basketball Playoffs.

Jacobson: What are your goals this year?

Beal: My goals for the rest of this year are to excel in academics and on the golf course and know that I had a good high school experience.

Jacobson: Now that you are a senior, what challenges have you been facing?

Beal: Getting acquainted with the real world. People talk about how it?s not that much different, but it is. There?s a lot more that goes into just living when you?re older.

Jacobson: Who inspires and motivates you?

Beal: I motivate myself. My dad also gives a lot of inspiration and coaches me.

Jacobson: Where will you be attending next fall and what do you want to major in?

Beal: I will be attending Fresno State and i plan to major in finance. After graduating from Fresno State, I plan on attaining my law degree from University of San Francisco.

This writer can be reached via Twitter @katiejacobson44. Follow the Feather on Twitter @thefeather.

For more features, read the March 2 article, Where are they now? David Lee.

By |2015-03-23T00:00:00+00:00March 23rd, 2015|Announcements, Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

FC hits NY: Day 5 (SLIDESHOW)

Editors1Viviana Hinojosa | The Feather Online Archive

Feather editors Ryan King, Chloe Mueller, Rees Roggenstein and Sara Peterson bask in the glow of a CSPA Digital Gold Crown while at Columbia University, March 20.

Since arriving in New York, the staff have awaited this moment with nausea. Hoping that they could once again grab the Columbia Scholastic Press Association Digital Gold Crown at the 91st annual convention and continue the winning streak. The team began the day with hope in their eyes.

Just like every other day, the team straggled into the lobby where the students met and then left to their various destination. Today their trip to Columbia University and find out their fate. Editors-in-Chiefs Sara Peterson and Chloe Mueller led a class early in the morning, while the rest of team like previous days attended the other various lectures by prominent figures within the journalistic society.

After the first class, the team decided to rest and work on the ever needy Feather. Students took this opportunity to rest in the lounges around the college. Finally the moment arrived, the editors filed into the auditorium where their fate rested.

Because of the over 2,600 students and 299 schools in attendance, the names of the winners were rattled off in an alphabetical order. The team waited with faces tense and eyes glued to the screen, their time came and went, the Feather had not been called, all the editors turned in shock and confusion.

However, God has a since of humor known only to himself. The association misplaced The Feather in the line-up, and ten minutes later were called to the front of the auditorium.

The team headed outside to find snow piling upon itself, increasing the joy of their seven-month accomplishment. The entirely new team had pulled it off; they won a Gold Crown, proving that anybody with a heart can make it to the top. After taking numerous photos out in the snow of this terrific event for the school and the program, the team headed back for some rest.

After making it back to the hotel, students split off and took a rest in preparation for a celebratory dinner, all fees paid for. Joyful and excited, the team rested and headed off to dinner. The last day touring New York was over and their time to leave had come. For a final time, students will once again rise early, but this time to head back home.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @Josh_Carter.

For more news, read the March 19 article, FC hits NY: Day 4 (SLIDESHOW).

By |2015-03-23T00:00:00+00:00March 23rd, 2015|Features, News, Photos 2014-15, Uncategorized|1 Comment

Junior NOTS movie: Saturday Night Live

FeatherLogoAs each class prepares their NOTS movies for debut on March 28, the junior class of 2016 believes they have what it takes to receive the overall “Best Movie” award.

Though the juniors originally planned on recreating the movie, High School Musical,” due to a lack of class participation they decided to recreate the Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon. So far, the class has filmed many short skits that can be regularly seen on the Tonight Show, such as “Mean Tweets.”

By recreating scenes people already know and love the class hopes to get students excited over their production.

Gillian Rea, ’16, is the co-director of the junior NOTS movie. She believes that the Jimmy Fallon show was a good choice, because it didn’t require a large number of students to be on screen at once. Rea hopes this often watched TV-series will increase the productions popularity.

“When we decided to film a recreation of the Jimmy Fallon show I was really excited,” Rea said. “I love watching his show each week, and I hope the rest of the student body is able to relate to this film and understand where the jokes are coming from. I have had an excellent group of students who are committed to this production, and their help has been invaluable. We hope all the parents and students appreciate our movie and all the work that went into creating it.”

One of the head actors of the junior NOTS film is Tyler Breedlove, ’16. Tyler has played a major role in the production of the film since it first started. He has made the effort to attend every meeting and help in any way he can. Breedlove believes his acting and natural sense of humor help the storyline flow naturally.

“When we originally started filming for High School Musical, I was cast to play the main character,” Breedlove said. “As things started changing I told the directors I still wanted to be involved and help any way I could. I was able to play a main role in many of our skits and help write them as well. I can’t wait to see our movie on the big screen at NOTS.”

Whether or not the junior class wins the award for best picture, students involved thoroughly enjoyed their experience, and look forward to making another movie next year.

All the high school movies will be on display the morning of March 28 for parents and public view, and also to vote for the awards, from 9-11 a.m. in the Green Room. For more information, contact [email protected]

For another features article, read Former campus teacher reflects on time spent at FC

Follow <i>The Feather</i> via Twitter <a href=”https://twitter.com/thefeather” target=”_blank”>@thefeather</a>,  Instagram <a href=”https://instagram.com/thefeatheronline” target=”_blank”>@thefeatheronline</a> and Facebook <a href=”https://www.facebook.com/thefeatheronline” target=”_blank”>@thefeatheronline</a>. This writer can be reached via Twitter:@JustinHFeather

By |2015-03-23T00:00:00+00:00March 23rd, 2015|FC Events, Features, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

FC hits NY: Day 4 (SLIDESHOW)

DSC_7293Ryan King, Photographer

With two days of touring behind them, Feather editors and adviser Greg Stobbe pose in from of the Freedom Tower in NYC before they visit the 9-11 Memorial Museum, March 19.

With two full days in New York under their belts, the editors prepared themselves for their third full day in the city. One more day and the team will spend the rest of the week at Columbia University for the Columbia Scholastic Press Association’s 91st convention.

Warm clothes were strongly suggested and the group departed from the hotel at 9:30 a.m to take the subway as FC hits NY and visit the 9/11 Memorial.

The 9-11 Memorial has been in the stages of construction since 2007 and is still being added to. The highlight of the site was the museum dedicated to honoring those who lost their lives and their loved ones.

After the memorial, the editors made their way down Wall Street and popped in to the Trinity Church. Following the cathedral the group made their way to Battery Park where they watched street dancers perform and viewed the Statue of Liberty from afar.

From there, the girls made their way back to Times Square to shop freely and the boys took a trip to Grand Central Station before returning back to Times Square to shop.

The group met up at 7:45 p.m. to make their way to the 8 p.m. Broadway showing of An American in Paris and ate a late dinner at TGI Fridays.

First timer in New York City, Trevor Beal, shares his impressions of the city along with his favorite aspects of the trip.

“This is my first time ever being in NYC,” Beal said, “I have been to other big cities before but none compare to NYC, Grand Central Station and Wall Street have been my favorite parts of the trip so far, along with the Phantom of the Opera play and 911 Memorial Museum.”

Chloe Mueller, Editor-in-Chief, says she will enjoy giving a session at the 91st CSPA Journalism Convention at Columbia University.

“This year gave me a new look on the trip because we are teaching sessions at Columbia University,” Mueller said. “But the sightseeing is still fun. I loved the 9/11 Memorial.”

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @gaby_siqueros.

For more news, read the March 18 article, FC hits NY: Day 2 (SLIDESHOW, VIDEO).

Alumna Heather Carr: life with professional athlete

carr 6Courtesy Heather (Neal) Carr

Campus alumna Heather (Neal, ’08) Carr) updates her story since graduating, including marriage to Derek Carr and new baby, Dallas. Carr updates her years since grad, wife of NFL quarterback

Carr updates her years since grad, wife of NFL quarterback

Many FC alumni move on to bigger and better things, taking what they have learned from their years in high school and applying them to life in the real world. Very seldom do we discover that some of those alumni end up being in the spotlight. Former FC alumna Heather Carr graduated with the class of 2008, and went on to marry current NFL Oakland Raiders quarterback and former Fresno State quarterback Derek Carr.

During high school, Heather (Neal, ’08) Carr discovered her passion for cheerleading, hoping to pursue it in college. However at the time she attended Fresno State, the cheerleading program did not exist due to the absence of a cheer coach.

“Originally, I thought I would go to Azusa, they had a really good cheer squad, but then I think the whole dynamic of staying close to home really drew me in, and I wasn’t ready to leave, and God definitely knew I wasn’t ready to get out there and do things on my own, so I went to Fresno State,” Carr said. “Almost all of my cheer girls stayed in Fresno, and went to FPU, or Fresno State, and it was nice to know that they were there, so we could hang out and be with each other all the time. That really helped going to Fresno State.”

Carr majored in teaching, gaining her desire for teaching when she was in the fourth grade. Her inspiration for this was her mother, who was a fourth grade teacher, and who Carr would go watch intriguingly as she taught her students. Although she is still involved in spiritual mentoring, God led her on a different path from teaching when she met Derek.

Heather Carr worked at Hollister at the start of her freshman year at Fresno State and later went on to work at BJ’s, where she encountered the newly discovered football star.

“I met Derek my junior year, and I actually met him at my work,” Carr said. “It was his first year at Fresno State and after we met, we just started hanging out at school. He graduated high school early to come to Fresno State, so when I met him, he was on the team, but he didn’t start or anything he was just red shirting.”

After some time of dating and getting to know each other, Derek and Heather decided to take their relationship a step forward, marrying in 2012. Being married to a football player in college was a fun experience to Heather Carr.

“It was awesome to be married in college; I loved it. I think when you find that right person, it doesn’t matter how old you are,” Carr said. “Especially us, because we were both really mature for our age, and we were just ready to settle down. In college it was fun; we had class together. I think we made it that way, and so it made class really fun and interesting. But its always fun to have class with your spouse.”

In August of 2013, the Carr family added a new member: Dallas. Since Dallas was born at the beginning of football season, it made it difficult for Heather, being a married mom in college and Derek being away at practice, normally from 5-9 p.m.

“Derek knows exactly what he wants and what he needs to do, and he will get it done,” Heather said. “He took summer school before I even met him so that he could graduate, so he could just go play football. He had a plan, before he even got into college.

“Dallas was God’s plan, and according to Derek, he grew more chest hairs because with Dallas, he now had more responsibilities. So now he had a family, more responsibilities: Derek would even say in the games, ‘he would play harder knowing that he had to get into the NFL because he had a family, and he had to feed them.’ It does, it makes you work harder.”

All of the hard work and determination payed off in 2014, when Derek Carr was drafted to go play in the NFL for the Oakland Raiders. The lifestyle of Heather and Dallas Carr drastically changed with this new chapter in their lives.

You get to meet and interact with a lot of people. I am in a Bible study group with the other wives, and its awesome because you can share God’s love with people who don’t even have that. Because in the NFL, people have I guess, quote everything, so it’s awesome to be able to share what they don’t have, and that is Jesus. So that is definitely a pro of being a part of all this. It is just that you get to reach a lot of people with where you are at. –Heather (Neal) Carr, ’08, former FC cheerleader, wife of Derek Carr 

“It’s different in the NFL,” Heather said. “There is literally no phone conversation, no texting the whole day. He is gone from 4:30 a.m., to about 6 p.m., and we don’t hear from him all day. Then, he would come home at 6 p.m., we would eat dinner, an then he would study the playbook and watch film, so we really don’t get to see him all that much.

“It is very different being an NFL wife compared to a college wife,” Heather continued. “Especially since Dallas is at an age now where he knows when daddy is gone, so its hard. I get tired cause he’s moving around and crawling on everything, so when Derek is home, it is nice to get a little break.”

Although the football season is tiring for Carr with Derek’s absence, the off season is a much needed reward for the family of three.

“We get a break around December, and then they start back again in April,” Heather said. “I love that we get an off season, because with some jobs, a lot of people don’t get that, and we get to spend time together as a family. Our biggest thing we love to do when we get our family time is just staying home, going to the park, playing soccer, anything that we can do with Dallas, just because we don’t get to stay home a lot.”

Being a NFL wife, Carr loves the new experiences she gets to encounter. Born from a strong Christian family, Carr loves the opportunity to share with the other NFL wives the light of the Lord, something that is very important to her, and the family as well.

“You get to meet and interact with a lot of people. I am in a Bible study group with the other wives, and its awesome because you can share God’s love with people who don’t even have that,” Heather said. “Because in the NFL, people have I guess, quote everything, so it’s awesome to be able to share what they don’t have, and that is Jesus. So that is definitely a pro of being a part of all this. It is just that you get to reach a lot of people with where you are at.”

Although there are many benefits of being a family member of an NFL player, there are also some hardships.

“You really don’t have a lot of time with your family. I know it is Dallas and I alone a lot during the season,” Carr said. “My parents have a condo up by where we live, so they are there almost every week, and it is really nice to have my mom watch him sometimes so I can go run some errands, or stuff like that. Just connecting with the girls (the wives), we have playdates with the kids, and things like that is fun. But that is definitely a con is that you really don’t get a lot of time with your husband.”

The Carr family had a bit of a scare in August of 2013, when their son Dallas was born with intestinal malrotation, which is a blockage of the digestive tract due to the twisting of intestines, that prevents the proper passage of food. They found the problem approximately six hours after he was born, and they rushed him to Valley Children’s Hospital when they noticed he wouldn’t eat, and he kept throwing up. There, Dallas had his first of may surgeries at only ten hours old.

“We were actually really blessed, because he was born eight days early, and if he was born on time, he might have not made it. So, that was definitely God’s blessing on us,” Carr said. “Although the fist surgery went well, he still wasn’t getting better. After 21 days, we finally got to go home, even thought he was still throwing up, but they told us it would correct itself over time. We took him in again a week later, where they admitted him and he had his third surgery. That was the toughest, just because I remember thinking, is this ever going to end?”

Throughout this difficult time, Carr really relied on the Lord, and He did not disappoint.

At this time, Derek was gone, because he was in football, so his trainer would call him off of the field, straight from practice, to let him know when Dallas was having another surgery,” Carr said. “So, it was really hard for both me and Derek. It was really hard for him to focus on football when his son was having surgery in the hospital.

“Before Dallas’ surgery, Derek wasn’t here yet, but I was praying with Dallas, asking God to show me a sign that this is going to end. Yes, this was his plan, and he was making us stronger through this, and we are trusting in you, and praising you, but I would love a sign just to know. Dallas was asleep at this time, out completely, and he sits up, looks at me, and winks, and then instantly falls right back asleep. Right then, I knew, we were done with this. It was the best feeling ever.”

All of the obstacles they went through made them realize that they could handle anything, and that God was doing this for his glory. It was humbling to the Carr family that they got to share God’s love and light through Dallas’s story.

Heather hopes to continue her love of teaching and help share Jesus’s light with many young adults, and in the mean time, will continue to enjoy time spent with her family, and living the life of the Raiders quarterback’s biggest fan.

This writer can be reached via twitter: @ashhasthescoop.

For more features, read the March 17 article, Annual auction raises over 135,000 for campus
.

By |2015-03-18T00:00:00+00:00March 18th, 2015|Alumni, Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

FC hits NY: Day 2 (SLIDESHOW, VIDEO)

GroupHotelDay2Greg Stobbe, adviser

While the group still needs to tighten up sessions for the CSPA convention, Feather editors gather in the lobby of Hotel Edison before they embark on a day of touring Manhattan, March 17.

The Feather editors started their first day of tourism in New York City on the holy day for the Irish: St. Patty’s Day, March 17. With a couple of days dedicated to checking out the Big Apple before attending and speaking at the 91st annual Columbia Scholastic Press Association’s (CSPA) convention, today FC hits NY.

Attempting to avoid a sea of green chaos, adviser Greg Stobbe suggested the team spend most of their day in Little Italy and Soho, eating and shopping. The staff departed Hotel Edison at 8:15 a.m. and made their way to the nearest subway station before the parades and celebrators crowded Times Square.

Not eating before their departure, the staff insisted that the first thing they do in Little Italy was get breakfast before treading onward to shopping. Heading the cries of his people, Stobbe led his staff to Ferrara: an Italian bakery and cafe with a wide range of different kinds of food options. Though breakfast meats were available, many of the students opted for the pastries.

After finishing breakfast the female staffers abandoned their male counterparts to get an early start on their shopping, leaving the men behind in the cafe in favor of rushing to Soho and all its stores had to offer. Their shopping spree was short lived, however, as a couple of the girls fell ill and left Soho early to get back to the comfort of their hotel rooms.

Though the women were down for the count, the men endured through the elements and their check balances. Before impending bankruptcy set itself upon them, Stobbe intervened and called the men to Il Palazzo where they enjoyed an authentic Italian lunch. The boys left for the hotel at 2 p.m. and arrived at around 2:30 p.m.

Having about five hours of rest time before the first play of the New York trip, students took full advantage of this opportunity to get much needed shut eye. Many of the students stayed awake from Monday morning to Tuesday afternoon without sleep, easily achieving an “all-nighter.”

After the five-hour nap, the students woke from their dens and began preparing for the first play of many on their trip. Upon departing the hotel 7:10 p.m. everyone soon felt the nose numbing wind that New York had to offer. Racing from the subways and the streets the team eventually made their way to the first play, The King and I, which began 8 p.m. and ended at 11 p.m.

Once the play ended, hunger soon plagued the students again. They left the theatre and moved to the subways to get back to Times Square. Upon arriving, the team immediately spotted an Applebees and moved like predatory animals towards this beacon. Once they finished their food everyone departed for the hotel and arrived at 12:30 a.m.

Most of the Feather staff went to their rooms and prepared the next day for the journalism conference at Columbia University.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @RRoggenstein.

For more about The Feather in NY, read the March 16 article, FC hits NY: Day 1 (Slideshow, Video).

32nd Annual FCS Auction raises over $140,000

auctionFC file photo

The 32nd annual FC Auction raised over $140,000 for Fresno Christian, March 14.

The 32nd Annual FCS auction is a highly anticipated event in which the generosity and close knit community is exemplified. Each year, families and FC enthusiasts look forward to the opportunity for a fun way to give back to the school which has touched their lives.

At the auction March 14, attendees were given a unique auction number and were able to bid upon different items including desserts, gift cards and donated items. Once dinner was served participants enjoyed a quick trailer of the upcoming April musical, Music Man.

Over the course of dinner the silent tables began to close and a raffle took place where attendees could win a variety of different hundred dollar prizes.

The highlight of the night, the live auction, offered a wide array of prizes. Prizes included everything from front row seats at the 2014-’15 graduation ceremony to signed helmets from Oakland Raider QB Derek Carr.

Every table at the auction sold out within weeks. The auction brought in a record breaking $140,000+. The money is used in multiple ways but is focused on filling the funding gap between tuition and the amount needed to operate the school.

Dr. Sam Hinton, father to Max Hinton, shares his impressions of this years auction and remembers attending his first auction for FC.

“I started volunteering at the auction when I was a sophomore at Fresno Pacific because that’s where they used to hold the auction,” Hinton said. “The auction this year is very intimate and elegant, I love how the auction brings in money and helps the community get together and remind each other why we support the school and what a great place it is.”

I have co-chaired the auction with Pete DeGroot for at least 10 years now. My favorite memory is when my girls to attended FC and now I get to watch my grandchildren grow up here. The whole thing has been a blessing and now I can give back because my kids are grown. I expect to net over $100,000 for the good cause of this school and help all the young people who attend here. –Marvel French, grandmother to Maddie and Maicy Luginbill, and FC Board member

Former history teacher Ellen King comments on the decorations and reminisces on the numerous years she spent teaching.

“The auction is decorated beautifully, I love the tables, the centerpieces, Chinese lanterns it’s all just so beautiful,” King said. “I have attended almost every auction, I honestly cannot remember not attending one. Coming to the auction makes me really miss the kids and teaching.”

Marvel French, grandmother to Maddie and Maicy Luginbill, comments on her favorite FC memories and shares her expectations for the 32nd annual auction.

“I have co-chaired the auction with Pete DeGroot for at least 10 years now,” French said. “My favorite memory is when my girls to attended FC and now I get to watch my grandchildren grow up here. The whole thing has been a blessing and now I can give back because my kids are grown. I expect to net over $100,000 for the good cause of this school and help all the young people who attend here.”

Nancy Weis, long time auction attendee, shares her first impressions of the auction.

“I have attended the auction for about 20 years, my children graduated from here and now my grandchild attend. We want to support this school because we love it and what it stand for,” Weis said. “We have a lot of great memories here, we met a lot of great people here at FC and my children made great friends. Coming in the auction just looks beautiful and it just feels likes its going to be a great night.”

Senior FC student, Collin Winegarden, came out to the auction to perform with his drama class. The class sang and danced to a portion of the Music Man, which will be debuting in April.

“I’m here for drama because we performed a dance from our upcoming musical Music Man,” Winegarden said. “I think it went well but we still have a little room for improvement. It was a good practice run for us because now we know what we have to work on.”

Superintendent Jeremy Brown talks about his first year at the auction as Superintendent. This experience has given him a new perspective on the event.

“I love interacting with the different families, it’s amazing how many people come out here to support. Its a full house, its a great lively events and everyone is here to support Fresno Christian Schools,” Brown said. “I went last year and didn’t really know many people because I was just hired. But this year it’s great because I know the community a lot better.”

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_sarapeterson.

For more features, read the March 16 article, Career Day: Professionals educate students, share experiences.

By |2015-03-17T00:00:00+00:00March 17th, 2015|FC Events, Features, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Career Fair: Professionals educate students

IMG_1146Jason Swain | The Feather Online Archive

Over 10 different speakers gave presentations on career choices and how to begin preparations for them in the 4th annual Career Fair, March 11.

In hopes of better educating campus students on different career paths, FC hosted the 4th annual career fair, March 11. Students attended three sessions throughout the afternoon followed by a meet and greet in the court yard.

The session included a variety of different speakers such as ABC 30 reporter Amanda Venegas, ultrasound technician Robyn Hill, superintendent Jeremy Brown, Engineering student Danielle St. Marie, NASA project manager Suzy Dodd, nurse Laura Sherfield, speech pathologist Christie Edmondson, Detective David Fries, CEO of High Tech Homes Jay Cobb, veterinarian Todd Conlan, occupational therapist Dorothy Siqueiros, and senior gas estimator Scott Belmont.

Aspiring engineer Breanna Jennings, ’15, says that she learned about the educational requirements and qualities an engineer should possess.

“I definitely went to the engineer session, they hardly ever have an engineer come and speak so I was really excited to learn about what it takes to be in that profession,” Jennings said. “It was awesome that she [/fusion_builder_column]

[Danielle St. Marie] is an alumni and was willing to come back and give us really helpful information.”

Venegas gave a session and Claire Kollenkark, ’16, looks forward to career day every year.

“Amanda’s session was really fun,” Kollenkark said. “She is like a local celebrity and she took time out of her day to teach us a thing or two about what she does. Now that I’m a junior, I realized how soon I’m going to be picking a career and it’s great that the school cares enough to put something like this on with so many different people to chose from.”

My favorite presentation was probably the veterinarian,” Counts said. “He was very friendly and not intimidating. He just laid all the information out and told us that this is what you choose to get into if you pursue this career. He helped me because I’ve been looking down the veterinarian path.  — Freshman Celeste Counts

Occupational Therapist Dorothy Siqueiros urges students to get a jump start on their career and connect with other people for the best educational and financial options available.

“I know that college has gotten really expensive over the years and I really hope kids out there know that there are people to talk to that have gone or are going through the whole process of earning their degrees,” Siqueiros said. “Talk to people and find out what process is going to work best for you. And I tell people all the time to go observe the job they wish to pursue while they’re still in high school, you can either rule it out or keep looking into it.”

Laura Sherfield, a nurse at Valley Children’s Hospital gives her advice to teens and insight on how her passion for nursing began.

“I first decided to pursue a career in nursing when I was really young,” Sherfield said. “My mom was a nurse also so I grew up around it and fell in love with it from the beginning. I tend to have more of a compassionate personality. I would advise you high school kids to get involved early in a hospital, job shadow, become an intern, and get a job as soon as possible to gain as much experience as possible.”

CEO of Forward Advantage Chris Roggenstein is happy with the diversity and serving opportunities the annual career day holds.

“I liked the diversity of the student service projects,” Roggenstein said. “It let students serve in a manner that they were gifted and hopefully with an attitude of serving God while serving their fellow man.”

Senior PG&E gas estimator Scott Belmont comments on the success that hard work and dedication could potentially bring to your career.

“I am a gas transition design engineer,” Belmont said. “I started working for PG&E 30 years ago on the end of a shovel and gradually worked my way up and took a lot of different positions and here I am now. When Michelle Warkentin called me to speak, I agreed because it’s great that people come in and give students a variety of different careers to look in to.”

Freshman Celeste Counts shared that she was drawn to the veterinarian in particular, due to her own interests in the trade.

“My favorite presentation was probably the veterinarian,” Counts said. “He was very friendly and not intimidating. He just laid all the information out and told us that this is what you choose to get into if you pursue this career. He helped me because I’ve been looking down the veterinarian path.”

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.
This writer can be reached via Twitter: @gaby_siqueiros.

For another news article read Campus families gather to support 32nd FC Auction

By |2015-03-16T00:00:00+00:00March 16th, 2015|FC Events, Features, Leadership, Uncategorized|0 Comments

FC hits NY: Day 1 (SLIDESHOW, VIDEO)

IMG_6974Adviser Greg Stobbe

Nine Feather editors are traveling to NY to attend and speak at the 91st annual Columbia Scholastic Press Association’s convention. The staff arrives in Times Square ready for a night tour, March 16.

After arriving to San Francisco the night before, a total of nine journalists boarded the plane on Monday, heading to New York, March 16. Editors Rees Rogenstein, Josh Carter, Chloe Mueller, Gaby Siquiros, Ryan King, Callista Fries, Trevor Beal, John Dooman, Sara Peterson and chaperones Angie Fries and adviser Greg Stobbe arrive at the airport around 8 a.m. and will tour that evening as FC hits NY.

The Feather staff will be heading to Columbia University, for the 91st annual CSPA Spring Convention, March, 18-20. Along with being nominated for the Gold Crown by the Columbia Scholastic Press Association (CSPA), Fries, King, Peterson and Mueller will be presenting workshops during the convention. Throughout their stay, the editors will also spend two days touring Manhattan.

While at the CSPA Spring Convention, editors will be attending classes and workshops relating to journalism and school run newspapers. At the end of the Spring Convention, The Feather staff will attend the 2015 Online Digital Crown Awards ceremony, in which they will receive either a Silver or Gold crown.

After arriving in New York around, 7:30 p.m., the staff departed from the JFK airport and headed towards their home for the next week, the Hotel Edison.

Upon arrival students dropped off their luggage and headed to Juniors for a late dinner and then traveled to the subway to buy their metro passes for the week.

Students then took a quick tour of Times Square and headed back to their hotel, to work on articles, and to get some much needed rest.

EDITORS NOTE: Stay tuned for daily updates including slideshows and videos as FC hits NY.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @rynnking_.

For more news, read the March 13 article, Blood Drive honors FC alumna currently in recovery.

College trip to SoCal, explore universities

photo (17)Michelle Warkentin, academic advisor

Campus juniors and seniors traveled for a college trip to SoCal to visit universities, March 3-4.

Juniors and seniors took their annual College Trip, March 3-4. Ten students attended along with Academic advisor Michelle Warkentin, Andrea and Scott Donaghe. The group visited four different universities in southern California along with a famous ice cream parlor for dinner.

The first college the group visited was the University of Southern California. The school first opened in 1880 to 53 students. The students were amazed by the architecture and the size of the campus.

While at USC, Morgan Miller, ’16, fell in love with the atmosphere.

“The campus was really beautiful,” Miller said. “It was very spacious and the buildings were outstanding. I also really liked the food they offered on campus. Everyone was very welcoming and nice.”

Andrew Moore, ’16, although a faithful USC fan, knows the price makes attending the school difficult.

“I grew up as a big fan of USC,” Moore said. “I thought the campus itself was awesome. However, the price makes attending the school unlikely for me. But I will still always be a fan of the university.”

The second college the group attended was Azusa Pacific University. The group was able to meet up with alumnus Elora Hargis, ’14, before touring the campus. APU was the first Christian campus the group visited.

The Christian atmosphere of Azusa Pacific, along with their gym, seemed important to Caleb Goodale, ’16.

“I liked how the school offered chapels and worship sessions,” Goodale said. “Also I wasn’t expecting their gym to be that big. It was probably one of the nicest gyms I’ve seen. However, I didn’t care for the fact that you were only allowed to miss 10 chapels.”

Junior Bailey Brogan did not like the way the campus was set up. He also did not care for the atmosphere the campus offered.

“I didn’t really like how the school was split up into a west campus and east campus. Although they offered a trolley ride, it still seemed inconvenient,” Brogan said. “Also, the west campus seemed sort of cramped. But we had just come from USC so Azusa didn’t really have a chance.”

My favorite part of the college trip would have to be going to Farrells for dinner. It was like walking into an old diner and definitely made you feel like you were taken back to a different time period. It was a great bonding time with my fellow classmates and we left there with many memories to share. –Junior Timothy Nyberg

That night, the group went to Farrell’s Ice Cream Parlour Restaurant for dinner. Majority of the group agreed that dinner was the best part of the trip. Many of the students had participated in Kids Day earlier that morning and were running on their last bit of energy, which made the night that much more enjoyable.

After waiting an hour, the group was seated and the waitress, DeAnna, set the tone for the evening with her animated and sassy personality. The group decided to celebrate Brogan’s belated birthday, which included him going to “boot camp” once he finished his meal.

Timothy Nyberg, ’16, found the night very enjoyable and a dinner he would not soon forget.

“My favorite part of the college trip would have to be going to Farrells for dinner,” Nyberg said. “It was like walking into an old diner and definitely made you feel like you were taken back to a different time period. It was a great bonding time with my fellow classmates and we left there with many memories to share.”

The next morning, although tired, the group woke up bright and early to visit the next two universities. First on the list was the University of California Riverside.

Senior Justin Porter enjoyed the tour and learning about the school’s different research projects.

“I liked how the tour guide spoke about the research that their science program does,” Porter said. “I thought their study on the mantis shrimp and that spider with the golden silk was interesting. Also, the way they mapped the citrus DNA was pretty neat.”

The college trip is important because it allows students the opportunity to visit college campuses outside of our local area. For some students this is their first campus visit out of Fresno. I try to pick different types of schools so students are exposed to both large and small campuses, public and private. –Michelle Warkentin, academic advisor

While disappointed with one of the schools programs, Elise Winegarden, ’15, thought the campus was nice.

“I thought the campus was beautiful,” Winegarden said. “There were plenty of trees and open space outside. The orange trees smelled lovely too! However, their nursing program isn’t one of their stronger programs so this wasn’t the school for me.”

The final school the group visited was California Baptist University. There, they met up with alumnus Annalise Rosik who spoke about what she has enjoyed so far.

The first part of the campus that the group explored was the cafeteria, or the “caf”. CBU has the third best cafeteria in California and the students enjoyed its all-you-can-eat policy. Collin Winegarden, ’15, saw the “caf” as one of the schools best features.

“Obviously I loved the cafeteria and unlimited food!” Winegarden said. “The recreational center was pretty awesome too. I loved the variety of activities you could do there. But what I loved most was the campus itself. I thought it was the perfect size with plenty of trees.”

Although he enjoyed the cafeteria, Joshua Carter, ’16, feels like the university still needs to build a stronger reputation.

“As a school, CBU is great, however, it doesn?t have a reputation which is one of its problems,” Carter said. “It needs to build a stronger reputation and one way to do that is hiring better professors and create strength in its different fields. I think by doing that, they will be known as a great Christian college and just a great college in general.”

Academic advisor, Michelle Warkentin, has been in charge of the annual college trip since it first began. She sees it as beneficial for the students who take it and enjoys seeing the students experience college life.

“The college trip is important because it allows students the opportunity to visit college campuses outside of our local area,” Warkentin said. “For some students this is their first campus visit out of Fresno. I try to pick different types of schools so students are exposed to both large and small campuses, public and private.”

“In my opinion the best part of the trip was seeing students walk through the massive libraries, peek into the lecture halls, and eat lunch together on the campuses. It was neat to see them experiencing college campuses first hand and open their eyes to the possibilities of what lies ahead of them after high school.”

Overall, everyone who took the trip enjoyed it and felt it was worth its while. They will be taking the trip again next year for any juniors or seniors that are interested.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.
This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_olivialoren_.

For more features, read the March 11 article, Heritage honors Music Department with Sweepstakes Award (PODCAST, SLIDESHOW).

By |2015-03-12T00:00:00+00:00March 12th, 2015|FC Events, Features, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Music department earns Heritage Sweepstakes (PODCAST, SLIDESHOW)

Festival1Susan Ainley

The campus music department was honored with the Sweepstakes Award at the Worldstrides Heritage Music Festival, March 5-6. Seniors Ivette Ibarra and Andrew Guthrie, pictured, won Maestro awards, while Guthrie also won the “When you Wish” award.

Senior Andrew Guthrie earns Maestro, “When You Wish” honors

Every year students from the music department embark on a journey to Southern California to attend a singing festival, while either going to Worldstrides Heritage or ACSI. These festivals are to commemorate all the long hours practicing as a whole to put on a performance for high ranking adjudicators.

At 12 p.m., FC students boarded the charter bus en route to the 35th annual Worldstrides Heritage Music Festival, down to Los Angeles, California, March 5-6. Directors Susan Ainley and Lesley Bannister have never traveled to compete in this Southern California music festival, being new to their positions this year.

While attending the festival for the duration of their trip, they were able to visit Medieval Times, as well as Disneyland and participate in other recreational activities. Students were able to visit many sites in LA, but the majority of the trip was spent preparing and performing for the Heritage Festival competitions.

After getting back on the bus, students waited to arrive in LA. They visited Medieval Times around 6 p.m. where students saw the reenactments of duels and jousting. While watching the battles food that was served to the audience. Sophomore Trevor Trevino

“It was so fun, I loved the battles and the food was amazing. Probably it was because I was very hungry from traveling all day,” Trevino said. “I loved the environment that I was in, it made me want to become a knight and go battle.”

After the show students arrived at their final destination for the day, WYNDHAM Hotel. Students boarded the bus early at 7 a.m. on their way to Disneyland and California Adventure. Upon their arrival, students dispersed into small groups and visited different rides in the amusement parks.

I loved getting to try the authentic southern food in New Orleans Square. I had never tasted American food from the south. My favorite food was the authentic Gumbo. It had chicken, shrimp, and sausage with a creamy sauce all over rice. I want to try to find a restaurant that has this type food back in Fresno. –Junior Olivia Tandajaja

One of the most popular rides of the day was the new Cars ride. Senior Andrew Guthrie rode the Cars ride for the first time, and was impressed by the roller coaster type thrill ride and the layout.

“When we first got to Disneyland, and I saw a group of people headed over to Cars Land, I wanted follow them since I’ve never been on the ride before,” Guthrie said. “People had told me it was a really fun ride but it wasn’t until I saw it firsthand that I could truly appreciate it. I loved how you drove through the different rooms leading up to the race, but my favorite part of the ride was of course was the race itself.”

With a variety of different restaurants around the parks, foods from Asian, to South American, European were all available to students. Junior Olivia Tandajaja enjoyed foods from the south the most.

“I loved getting to try the authentic southern food in New Orleans Square,” Tandajaja said. “I had never tasted American food from the south. My favorite food was the authentic Gumbo. It had chicken, shrimp, and sausage with a creamy sauce all over rice. I want to try to find a restaurant that has this type food back in Fresno.”

Vice President of Heritage Festival Kyle Naylor discusses the effectiveness of the Heritage Music Festival

The following day band and choir had separate because of different of their different venue locations. Band had to be on their stage at 8:30 a.m., while choir had to arrive a little later, around 10 a.m. Band practiced through their songs before the actual performance.

After performing several songs, the band was adjudicated by three judges. Not all three spoke to the band, only one judge went up on stage with a given time of four minutes to critique the band.

After band had finished the performance they went out into the lobby where choir had arrived a short while before. The members of the band changed into more comfortable clothes to prepare for the second day of Disneyland, while choir began practicing for their upcoming performance.

After both the choir and band had finished their performances, everyone packed up and were ready to visit Disneyland one last time. Unlike the previous day where students were given bouncer tickets to which they could go to Disneyland and California Adventure, students could only wander in Disneyland.

One group had to wait an hour and ten minutes to board Space Mountain, but this provided opportunities for students to converse and learn new things about their peers outside of school. Senior Anthony Zhang had never been to Disneyland before. One of the things he disliked about Disneyland was definitely the wait for the rides.

“Disneyland was really fun, and I got to see why everyone loves Disneyland so much,” Zhang said. “But one thing I didn’t like was how I had to wait a long time to get on a ride. One ride called Space Mountain we had to wait for an hour and a some minutes. What was nice about you and your friends being stuck in line was that you could talk to them and see what they are like outside of school. I really liked that.”

I am so proud of my students. They have put in a lot of hard work, and many hours of practice. It is so exciting to see their efforts rewarded in such a meaningful way. To achieve a gold star rating as my first year as band director is so exciting, also to have our music program recognized with the sweepstakes reward is a sign of great things to come. –Leslie Bannister, band director

The concert hall, located in Big Thunder Mountain, where the awards took place was very open and no chairs were in visible. Music directors had their own section with chairs, while students sat on the ground with their appropriate schools. The opening ceremony of the awards ceremony began with “Goofy”, “Mickey Mouse”, “Pluto”, and “Daffy Duck” all dancing with a group of singers. After they had done their dance routine a wizard had come on stage to help present the awards with the Vice President of Heritage Kyle Naylor.

Heritage Festival awards, presented by Naylor, honored band and choir, where they earned honors: gold for jazz band and womens ensemble, silver for high school choir and junior high choir. Senior Ivette Ibarra and Guthrie won the maestro awards, and Guthrie also won the “When you Wish” award. The school music program won overall top prize earning the Heritage Sweepstakes Award.

Bannister was proud of her students as well as the Music Department as a whole. While this is only Bannister’s first year as band director, she excited to see how much of the work practicing payed off.

“I am so proud of my students. They have put in a lot of hard work, and many hours of practice,” Bannister said. “It is so exciting to see their efforts rewarded in such a meaningful way. To achieve a gold star rating as my first year as band director is so exciting, also to have our music program recognized with the sweepstakes reward is a sign of great things to come.”

Ainley was astounded by her choir group winning the best overall music program. Along with Bannister, this was also her first year as high school choir director.

“This is my first trip to Heritage as a high school choir teacher and I feel like it was the best possible experience for both teachers and students,” Ainley said. “Winning the sweepstakes trophy literally took my breath away, and I felt so humbled and honored that they would recognize the hard work that all Fresno Christian students do in order to achieve their very best.”

The writer can be reached via Twitter: @KevinGarcha.

For more features, read the March 10 article, Teen dating: The struggle.

By |2015-03-11T00:00:00+00:00March 11th, 2015|FC Arts, Features, Music, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Teen dating: The struggle

IMG_4824Jason Swain | The Feather Online Archive

Communicating directly with a partner during a relationship is a key in avoiding violence in teen dating.

This is the first of a three-part series about teen dating written by various Feather staff members.

President Barrack Obama named February National Teen Dating and Violence Awareness month, 2015 is the first year the month has been declared.

The reason for awareness of violence in teen dating is of course the volatility of the teenage mind but also the alarming statistics recently gathered by multiple sources.

A nationwide study about Teen Dating Violence revealed one in five girls and one in 10 boys said they had experienced teen dating violence (TDV) in the previous year, and often occurred more than once.

The common opinion on TDV is that only female teens are the receivers of violence, this is far from the truth as Kevin Vagi from the Center for Disease Control expounds upon.

“While female students have a higher prevalence than male students, male and female students are both impacted by teen dating violence,” said Vagi. “Prevention efforts may be more effective if they include content for both sexes.”

Connecting TDV to other problems in teen life such as suicidal behavior, depression or substance abuse is a tricky thing. Studying the affects of the dating life on other parts of teen behavior is nearly impossible due to the amount of other stimuli.

A key factor in violent behavior of all ages is stress, it affects middle aged men and women, elderly folks and teenagers.

While female students have a higher prevalence than male students, male and female students are both impacted by teen dating violence. Prevention efforts may be more effective if they include content for both sexes. –Kevin Vagi, Center for Disease Control 

All relationship are different; some catalysts to violence in a relationship are issues of power and control. Violent words and actions are tactics that an abusive partner uses to gain and maintain power and control over another person.

In high school peers that a partner will undoubtedly come in contact with is often a source of conflict. Many times one partner will not actively search for companionship from another student but rather come upon it by happenstance, leading the third party to believe the newly generated relationship is copacetic and normal.

Now the couple has arrived at a cross roads where jealousy and anger enter the relationship and seed the beginnings of violence. Control also enters at this point: one member of the relationship tries to monitor and control the others life and interaction with others, often sowing the seed of violence.

In American society sex has been popularized through different mediums such as TV shows, movies, music and increasingly accessible pornography. The road to purity is tougher now but that is no excuse for violence or immorality projected towards another human being. –Passport to Purity

The point of this series is to shed light on violence and relationships, and in the opinions of many behavioral experts, education is the best way to create healthy relationships. That is why President Obama proclaimed February 2015 National Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month, in hopes of raising awareness and educating teens about the natural pitfalls of dating at their age.

Thankfully many resources exist to help educate teens on healthy and productive relationships. One prevalent resource in the fight against impurity is Passport to Purity. P2P offers an in depth and interactive path to purity and copacetic relationships by teaching about the best ways to interact romantically with others.

The teachings emphasize the fact that once you enter into a relationship, either sexual or non sexual, you can never be the same afterwards, even using the term “damaged goods.” Many feel that the teachings in P2P are extreme in the way that they do not allow for full restoration and demean those who have made mistakes.

In our society sex has been popularized through different mediums such as TV shows, movies, music and increasingly accessible pornography. The road to purity is tougher now but that is no excuse for violence or immorality projected towards another human being.

Directly communicating with a partner during a relationship is a key in avoiding violence. If there are no established boundaries then both parties are subject to misinterpretation and even allegations of rape after the fact.

In the next installment of teen dating, the struggle, we will examine the risks and rewards of teen relationships.

For more information, read Teen sex prevented by parental involvement

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather and Instagram @thefeatheronline. The writer can be reached via Twitter @Beal2015.

For more features, read the March 5 article, Children’s Hospital drives Central Valley to volunteer towards cause (VIDEO, SLIDESHOW, PODCAST).

By |2015-03-06T00:00:00+00:00March 6th, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|5 Comments

BRIEF: Sleep Awareness Week’s sleep routine (PODCAST)

SleepAwarenessWeekhttp://sleepfoundation.org

This week has marked the annual Sleep Awareness Week in America, March 2-8, 2015.

This week has marked the annual Sleep Awareness Week in America, March 2-8. The implementation of this week into the national calendar is a testament to the importance of a proper sleep schedule.

Lack of sleep can cause many complications in one’s everyday routine. Just a few of these complications include slow brain function, lack of physical energy and, God-forbid, falling asleep at the wheel.

It is can be generally assumed that the older teens get, the less sleep is needed. Age, weight and other physical attributes factor into the exact amount you need, but the average number of hours an adult needs to sleep in order to have a smoothly functioning day is nine.

There are a few activities teens can add into the daily routine if they are having trouble sleeping that will help relax their body, granting a more sound state of rest.

Exercising on a daily basis with a proper diet can make it easier to fall asleep. If teens exercise routinely, though, use caution and make sure to not do any strenuous exercise at least three hours before bed, as this will only complicate your sleep efforts.

It is highly recommended that you try to avoid caffeine, at least in the afternoon, as this spikes energy levels. Also finishing your day off with a hot bath with salts can bring a great amount of inner peace before bedtime.

There are 25 more random acts of sleep routines that can help you reach comatose every night like clock work, but if you follow these few steps, you will be on the fast track to a deeper, more fulfilling sleep.

Make sure to keep the importance of sleep awareness in mind next time you or a friend is sleep deprived.

For more information on the importance of healthy sleep patterns, make sure to check out the Jan. 15 article, Student sleep triggers attentiveness, learning.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @namoodnhoj.

By |2015-03-06T00:00:00+00:00March 6th, 2015|Features, Podcasts, Podcasts 2014-15, Uncategorized|1 Comment

Former campus teacher reflects FC experience

Jason Swain | The Feather Online Archive

After teaching on campus for two years, alumnus Eric Witters, ’04, is now teaching history at Madera South High School.

At the beginning of this school year the FC campus was missing a former campus teacher, campus lifer and graduate (’04) and rambunctious soul: Eric Witters. Witters did not return to the staff for the 2014-’15 school year, instead he was hired at Madera South High School as a history teacher.

The lack of Witters’ impact not only in the classroom but in the hallways and on the basketball court can be felt by many students.

Many of his students are now freshman and have taken what they learned from Witters and incorporated it into their everyday actions in class. Devin Pitts, ’18, expounded upon what he learned from Witters.

“He was able to keep his classes entertained all the time,” Pitts said. “His methods were unusual but effective and thats why I enjoyed his classes so much. Some of the time in class I was in trouble but he helped me learn how to act correctly in a classroom.”

Even though many hope and pray for the return of “King Eric” their dreams will most likely never be realized. In today’s age of over staffed schools, Witters is a thankful for having a job at the moment.

“I will most likely stay in the public school system,” Witters said. “The job market is very sparse and it is not easy to pick and choose what schools you would like to teach at.”

Witters has gained recognition within his new school for being an innovative teacher. His incorporation of Apple devices and electronically studied material have set him apart from other teachers.

“Many of the techniques that I implement are ones that I learned while teaching at FC,” Witters said. “I value the two year experience in teaching that I had at FC and all of the great people that I learned from.”

Someone fit to judge the innovativeness of very different schools and cultures is Witters, he has taught at very diverse schools such as Kings Canyon Junior High School, FC and now Madera South High School.

Every school has the same goal, to educate their students and create well rounded individuals.

“Larger schools are just the same as small schools,” Witters said. “We are all trying to find the best way to motivate the students and develop tomorrow’s leaders.”

Without the guidance and teaching of dedicated individuals our future would be a bleak one. The motivation to help others become more than they ever dreamed of is what keeps Witters going, it is what he lives for.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @2015_Beal.

For more features, read the March 3 article, WWII Veteran receives long awaited medal.

By |2015-03-06T00:00:00+00:00March 6th, 2015|Features, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Childrens Hospital drives central Valley volunteers (UPDATE, VIDEO, SLIDESHOW, PODCAST)

KidsDay1Kylie Bell

Feather adviser Greg Stobbe hawks special edition Kids Day newspapers with Fresno Mayor Ashley Swearengin, March 3.

Feather staff joins student leadership to hawk special Fresno Bee Kids Day papers

UPDATE: March. 11
After an estimate was given, March 3, for Kids Day, Valley Children’s Hospital was able to count the remainder of the money raised with a total of $535,000. Last year’s Kids Day reached a total of $480,000, which set a record for future fundraising. While this is not the total final count, Children’s Hospital has passed the goal for this year’s Kids Day reaching over the estimated $530,000.

Each year, the community, Fresno Bee and ABC 30 all join forces to earn money for the patients of Valley Children’s Hospital. For the 28th time, Kids Day has encouraged hundreds of individuals to take time selling special edition Fresno Bee newspapers across the San Joaquin Valley to earn the money to help the cause, March 3.

Community members and campus students including notable figures and organizations from Mayor Ashley Swearengin, Police Chief Jerry Dyer, and Fresno State football coach Tim DeRuyter to student leadership and publications from FC.

This year, according to the Fresno Bee: an estimated amount of $340,500 and counting, has been provided at the time of 5 p.m., March 3. Children’s Hospital spokeswoman Zara Arboleda has stated this year’s goal of $530,000 is reachable.

Since last year, Children’s Hospital has received over $6.3 million in donations throughout the course of its 28 year history. This year they hope to pass $7 million in an even greater effort to support the patients of the Madera County hospital.

Celebrity corner encourages notable figures from the community to volunteer

With the increase of involvement of a local whose who, Kids Day volunteers have deemed the corner of Blackstone and Shaw “celebrity corner”. Many notable figures from the community, as well as ABC 30 and the Fresno Bee, have used this corner to sell their newspapers for the last seven to eight years.

From the start of Kids Day, Fresno Bee has partnered with Valley Children’s Hospital. Each year they prepare these special edition newspapers for hundreds of individuals to sell. Fresno Bee Executive Editor Jim Boren has been apart of Kids Day since it’s beginnings. He really enjoys the chance the chance to help raise money for the hospital and thinks of the event as a symbol for the community.

“Well, Kids Day for one, raises a lot of money for the hospital, and does a lot of good things, but it’s also a symbolism of how important Valley Children’s Hospital is to our community,” Boren said. “This is a hospital that really cares for kids almost all of us have had either a child or a relative who has gone through that hospital and it does great work and we are just out here to help.”

Boren adds that the vision of Kids Day is expanding through the years. Along with just Fresno, efforts have been raised all across the San Joaquin Valley, including cities like Visalia and the youth of the community.

“More and more people are getting involved, we expanded across the Valley,” Boren said. “Visalia is a huge part of Kids Day, they do great work down their, especially in the high schools. So it’s expanded. This hospital has served the entire San Joaquin Valley and over the central coast, so it is an important part of the whole region.”

I have never been to this (Kids Day), and so it’s really nice seeing all these people trying to support us. Think about it this way: you are going to save a life, just by a dollar, you know, maybe fifty cents. You could spend five, ten dollars on something else, something you don’t even use. So you can make a difference with just a little bit of money. –-Juan Mendez, father of Neymar Mendez, 2015 Kids Day ambassador child

ABC 30 has also partnered with Children’s Hospital, along with the Fresno Bee, to broadcast Kids Day all day long, promoting the event. ABC 30 news reporter Amanda Venegas has estimated the volunteers of the event to over 5,000. Using the hashtag #KidsDay2015, people could promote over social media, which Venegas thinks has helped the event.

“If I could have all of our reporters out showcasing the different locations that would be really neat,” Venegas said. “But we just showcase different areas of Fresno that we can make it out to. Besides the dozens of people you see here, there is about 5,300 volunteers all over the County, like in Visalia and Merced. There is people even in the Oakhurst area that are selling newspapers right now that you don’t see. And I think social media has been huge because we can actually see what people are doing and we don’t have to be there.”

Valley Children’s Hospital Ambassador Family was able to come to support Kids Day and encourage others to donate to the cause. Juan Mendez, father of Neymar Mendez, the ambassador child, was excited to see the involvement the community offered during Kids Day and the chance to see others give their time and money for the cause.

“I have never been to this (Kids Day), and so it’s really nice seeing all these people trying to support us,” Mendez said. “Think about it this way: you are going to save a life, just by a dollar, you know, maybe fifty cents. You could spend five, ten dollars on something else, something you don’t even use. So you can make a difference with just a little bit of money.”

President and CEO of Valley Children’s Hospital Todd Suntrapak echoes Mendez’ sentiments.

President and CEO of Valley Children’s Hospital Todd Suntrapak, who was born and raised in Fresno, participated in Kids Day as well. As once a patient of Children’s Hospital, Suntrapak thinks of this event as a way to help out the children of the San Joaquin Valley.

“It’s the least I can do to take my time and come out here and thank all the terrific volunteers that are working on our behalf today,” Suntrapak said. “But more importantly on behalf of making kids well, I mean really, that’s what essentially is happening here. All these volunteers are donating their time and selling papers in partnership with ABC 30 and the Fresno Bee at the end to really a child. It’s my pleasure to be here; I wouldn’t miss it.”

Mayor Ashley Swearengin has been selling newspapers on ‘celebrity corner’ since it’s start. With other notable figures, Swearengin adds that it all comes back to help the patients.

“Every year it just gets more and more exciting,” Swearengin said. “More and more people are here, we have students from Fresno State and athletic coaches. We’ve got our law enforcement leaders other elected officials and people are out here for the same reason: to help Childrens Hospital.”

Campus works with San Joaquin Valley to sell newspapers

Student leadership, began selling newspaper at a dim and chilly 4 a.m., along with The Feather staff who came just about 45 minutes later to corners at Alluvial and Cedar as well as Cedar and Alluvial. For several years now both campus clubs have participated in Kids Day to help Valley Children’s Hospital.

With a total amount of 980 newspapers sold, campus representatives were able to contribute $1,954.13 to the cause. Students were able to sell all the way till 9 a.m., where they then headed to their classes for the day.

Senior John Dooman has been participating in Kids Day for three years. While he did not sell as many newspapers as he expected, selling one encouraged him to appreciate his time during the day.

“This year I was a little late waking up, but I was glad that I could make it to Kids Day,” Dooman said. “Even though I didn’t sell a crazy amount of newspapers, the chance to even sell one is enough to help a child in need. No matter how early it was, I’m happy I went.”

Freshman Jaden Ventura has never been part of Kids Day till this year. As a member of The Feather he was able to be encouraged by the community around him as they donated thousands of dollars to the cause.

“I remember that I was on the corner and someone gave $20 for a paper and it made me realize that people really do care about Kids Day,” Ventura said. “Being able to help be apart of such a noble cause really made the entire day worth it.”

Opinions Editor Rees Roggenstein, also contributed to this article.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @rynnking_.

For more on Kids Day 2015, read the Fresno Bee articles, A look back at Kids Day 2015: from celebrity corner to students in Oakhurst and Fresno’s Mendez family stays strong despite child’s medical battles.

For more features, read the March 3 article, WWII Veteran receives long awaited medal.

Armenian artist reflects on genocide, homeland culture

P1090795_FotorMichael Fu

Original Armenian sculptures and paintings are displayed at the new exhibit at the Fresno Art Museum. Including pieces from Arminee Shishmanian.

Fresno Art Museum displays Armenian Genocide art

Fresno Art Museum currently features an emotionally moving and historically important exhibition to commemorate the 100th year anniversary of the Armenian Genocide. Named “1915-2015: Tradition, Legacy, Culture“, the exhibit reflects the the very first massacre in the 20th century.

All of the exhibit art pieces, including painting, sculptures and mixed art, are created by Armenian descendant artists.

Arminee Shishmanian, a local Armenian artist who participated in this exhibit, shared her family’s experience during and after the Genocide as well as her journey in the world of art.

On April 24, 1915 the Ottoman Empire gathered hundreds of Armenian community leaders and started the elimination targeted on the Armenian population inhabited in Turkey.

Between 1915 and 1923, three fourths of the Armenian population was wiped out of the world. The luckiest of all escaped from this massacre and emigrated to United States and several European countries. Many of them eventually settled down in Fresno due to the agricultural tradition they are familiar with.

Born in a family consist of Armenian culture, Shishmanian’s father formed a band when he came to the United States, which allowed her to witness the treasure culture even when the entire country is long lost. Shishmanian inherited the spirit and transform applied it into her art.

Sculpture of couple dancer facing each other is one of the bronze sculptures Shishmanian has made. The expression of the male dancer shows his deep devotion into the music and the hanging leg seems like it is still waiting to land on the ground. The female dancer has her dress floating in the air waiting to let it freely pulled by the gravity.

Arminee Shishmanian was born and raised in St. Louis, MO, the fourth city her family settled in. She eventually moved to Los Angeles with her mother and got married in Fresno.

Although Shishmanian did not experience the genocide in person, the tragedy befell on her parents when they were teenagers.

Shishmanian’s mom was 13 years old when Mehmed Talaat Pasha (the interior minister of Ottoman Empire at the time) ordered Turkish troops to remove all Arminians from the villages. Fortunately, she went to Constantinople (today’s Istanbul) for an Adenoidectomy right before the Turks started gathering Arminian in the villages and sending them on the death march to Syria. Most of her extended family members passed away during the death march due to deprivation of food and water as well as frequent rape, robbery and massacre.

I thought about it {relating her work to genocides}, but my personality and disposition does not want to dwell on sadness, because genocide is just a brutal thing. I actually was considering making a painting relating to the genocide, particularly to the removal of the people sent onto the death march. I have planned on this but it just wouldn’t come out. Most of the works I do has sort of an upbeat and positive angle. –Arminee Shishmanian, a local Armenian artist

Her father, ironically, was serving in the Turkish army at the time; while his family, along with some others in the area, gathered in the Armenian church and burned alive. When he found out the truth, he defected from the Turkish army and joined the French Foreign legion to fight the Turks.

After World War II was over, knowing zero English words, her father moved to the United States to attend Ohio State University.

As international students, we know how hard it is to come to America with limited English skills. But the courage he had that led him here is simply unimaginable.

Unlike most of the artist, Shishmanian have not been introduced to art until when she was 60 years old.

Guided by her neighbor and good friend, painter Marcia Freeman, Shishmanian developed the skill of watercolor. Later in 1995, dedicated to improve her skills, Shishmanian decided to join the art program at California State University, Fresno where she found another interest in clay.

Despite her tragic lost of the family, Shishmanian rarely reflect sadness or anger on her art work.
“I thought about it {relating her work to genocides}, but my personality and disposition does not want to dwell on sadness, because genocide is just a brutal thing,” Shishmanian said. “I actually was considering making a painting relating to the genocide, particularly to the removal of the people sent onto the death march. I have planned on this but it just wouldn’t come out. Most of the works I do has sort of an upbeat and positive angle.”

Shishmanian rarely have any preference to her pieces since she regard her pieces as many of her children. Each of them have a special spot in her heart. However, Shishmanian does have a favorite piece.

Using bright red, green and yellow in the art work, an oil painting of her four grandchildren was her favor piece in the house. With the bright colors, the painting delivers viewers warmth and happiness. The fact that children wearing jeans and long clothing suggest the cold temperature, but the bright sunshine came from the top right corner and the distinction of the shadow under the woods gives a warm feeling the viewers. Four children looking at the same direction over the edge brings the curiosity of the viewers along with them. Seems like something interesting is far in the background. A still picture brings the viewers back into their naive childhood.

Armenian Genocide is just a tip of an iceberg that represents the cruelty in human history. The suffer of Shishmanian’s Family and many others can not be changed. For people living in 21st Century, it is hard to imagine that these tragedies happened only a hundred years ago.

However, in the news we still see people committing terrible things to each other due to cultural and religious differences. Although we cannot change the past, our generation can definitely help to ensure that some certain parts of our history will not happen again.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather,  Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @MojunPan and @MichaelFu.

For more opinions, read the Feb. 27 column, Thankful for Scholastic Journalism Week 2015.

By |2015-03-04T00:00:00+00:00March 4th, 2015|Community Events, Features, Opinions, Uncategorized|3 Comments

WWII veteran receives long awaited medal

Brown1Courtesy Lin Brown

Jennings Brown, father of FC’s librarian Lin Brown, recently received a medal of valor for his service as a WWII veteran.

FC librarian shares story of father’s service

Jennings Brown, father of FC’s librarian Lin Brown, recently received a medal of valor for his service as a WWII veteran. The EX-POW medal was awarded to all ex-prisoners of war living in the central Valley.

It was because the Clovis VFW (Veteran’s of Foreign Wars) Chapter became aware that there were individuals who had not received their medals and worked to have them properly awarded that the ceremony took place on Feb. 2 of this year for Brown and three others, who are now at the Veteran’s Community Living Center.

Brown was stationed in June 1944 in England with a ten-man crew on the B-17, also called the Betty Jane. He became a gunner and photographer where he learned to take pictures of the bombs dropped over Germany to document how accurate the targets were hit.

On Sept. 13, 1944, the Betty Jane members were on their regular routine into Germany. While on their way out of the country they were spotted by the Germans and an air battle began. As his friends were being shot out of the sky around him his air crew suited up with parachutes.

As the pilot, Brown stayed to keep the plane steady and the rest of the crew jumped out. Brown was the last man out but before he jumped he gathered up all the sack lunches and extra supplies.

Brown’s granddaughter, Sarah Ogilvie, recalls her grandfather’s plane being found decades later. Ogilvie and her family talked about traveling to Germany, but in the end her grandfather was not up for the trip due to the emotional triggering of his past.

“A few years ago my grandfather received a phone call from a man in Germany,” Ogilvie said. “They had found the Betty Jane in a forest, and the remains of the pilot. It was very hard for my grandfather to hear that the plane had been found. We discussed going to see the wreckage but he just wasn’t up to it, it was just too painful to remember.”

When he landed he found a hollow log to hide out in to avoid capture by the Germans for as long as possible. All night he could hear gunshots and dogs barking. Brown knew he could not leave the hollow log until he came up with a plan. The survival kits he took from the plane consisted of food, water, purification tablets, a map of Europe, and French currency. To travel unseen he would have to travel at night towards the French border. During his journey he remained on the outskirts of town and witnessed a German soldier’s tearful goodbye to his girlfriend.

A few years ago my grandfather received a phone call from a man in Germany. They had found the Betty Jane in a forest, and the remains of the pilot. It was very hard for my grandfather to hear that the plane had been found. We discussed going to see the wreckage but he just wasn’t up to it, it was just too painful to remember. — Sarah Ogilvie, Lin Brown’s granddaughter

After six weeks of his time stuck in Germany, Brown became more confident with traveling through the day. One day he came across a village. When the villagers spotted him he was immediately identified as an American. They cornered him with pitchforks and rifles into a barn to be held as their prisoner until the German soldiers arrived. Before the soldiers prepared to take him away they gave him broth, which gave him really bad gas.

Brown remarks that that night he had farted the worst smelling farts he ever had. They were ordered to guard him the entire night in which he used his gas as ammunition against them.

The next day he was taken to a different location to be interrogated. He did not give anything up other than his serial number, but they still found out his information. They had clippings from Fresno Bee articles about him and information on his family including his wife’s name and mother’s home address.

“Chilling isn’t it,” Ogilvie said. “To think that someone in your home town had supplied such vital and personal information to the enemy. Imagine how he felt.”

Through the interrogation they asked Brown questions about the allies plans, missions he had taken and any information he could provide but he remained intentionally vague. Around that same time the shelter he was in was being bombed. The Germans forced their American prisoners to stand outside with dogs and guns trained on them. If they were to run they were to be shot.

Days later he was sent to a Stalag, which is what the Germans called prison camps. There they were forced to stand for hours and listen to the rules. To show their strength and intimidate each new group of prisoners coming in the Germans would take a man and let the guard dogs kill him. Brown’s background in handling guns got him a position in a guard tower just in case a breakout happened. No breakout ever did, but the guards would randomly beat him for an unknown reason. On Christmas Eve when the American soldiers were singing Christmas carols the Germans joined in singing in German. It was one of the few times that there was a moment of peace.

He was moved to a different prison camp where he met a man who had traded rations for a violin. One morning all the German soldiers had left during the night because of news of the Russian army approaching. The men gathered up their belongings and headed out to an airfield they had heard about. Throughout the journey he had passed through many German villages that were stricken with famine and poverty. When they reached the airfield Russian tanks met them there and Brown and the other American men were able to fly home.

“The impact of the war on the people of Germany made a huge impression on him,” Ogilvie said. “He knew that he was not the only one who had suffered over the last year.”

Brown married Beverly Brown in September of 1943. He returned to American in 1945 and was able to receive a college education at Fresno State. Though he relied on the GI Bill for the support of his college payments he worked three jobs in order to support his family.

Lin Brown remembers her mother’s recollection of her father return from the war. Her mother felt the jobs and schooling he received helped him adapt to regular life again.

“Though my mother says he returned from his war experiences very different from when he was first drafted,” Brown said. “These everyday duties probably brought some normalcy to his life.”

Jennings Brown attended the Church of God growing up and remained a Christian through his wartime experience and on.

“They had found the Betty Jane in a forest, and the remains of the pilot,” Ogilvie said. “It was very hard for my grandfather to hear that the plane had been found. We discussed going to see the wreckage but he just wasn’t up to it, it was just too painful to remember.”

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather,  Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @nhudecek16 or through email at [email protected].

For more features, read the March 2 article, Where are they now? David Lee.

By |2015-03-03T00:00:00+00:00March 3rd, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Where are they now? David Lee

Lee-1Alexis Kalugin | The Feather Online Archive

Lee expands upon the details of his current day to day life and the changes that have occurred in the last few months.

Previous mathematics teacher shares present experiences with FC community

The start of this year brought about many changes to the FC campus, administration and student life. One of which was the absence of four year mathematics teacher, David Lee.

Since his departure at the end of the 2013-14 school year, Lee has taken up a part time teaching position at Buchanan High School, where he previously taught for a total of 19 years. Due to an increase in free time Lee has been able to pursue his many interests and spend a greater amount of quality time with family members.

In addition, after a six year absence Lee has once again decided to coach tennis. He was originally one of the essential builders of programs at both Buchanan and Clovis West. Lee currently holds a coaching position for Alta Sierra’s junior high tennis team.

Below Lee expands upon the details of his current day to day life and the changes that have occurred in the last few months.

Skyler: What drew you back to the Buchanan Campus?

Lee: There were a couple of reasons I went back to Buchanan. First of all I’ve taught at Buchanan for so many years that it really is kind of like a home to me because of the staff I work with there and the administration. Just the feeling of the school itself is a good feel for me because I have been a teacher there for about 16 or 17 years. A number of the teachers that I had worked with are still there. So there’s a sense of going back to my home and the fact that I could also work part time there. At Fresno Christian I was working full time and that was just a little more than I wanted to do and so with a part time offering at Buchanan I was able to have more of a sense of being retired. Plus my daughter is a junior at Buchanan. It’s a chance for me to spend time with her.

Skyler: How has your teaching experience been at Buchanan?

Lee: The kid’s at Buchanan are great and I really enjoy the subject that I am teaching(Algebra II). Life has kind of simplified for me. It’s not as hectic and so I’m more at peace with myself because I’m not feeling so rushed. It gives me a chance to witness to the kids at Buchanan because there are Christian kids in my classes but there are also many kids who are not Christian. As a teacher of faith I can be a good example to them. That’s not to say that I don’t miss the kids at Fresno Christian because during the three or four years I taught at Fresno Christian I have never had a class room show more kindness and love for me than I experienced there.

Skyler: How has teaching at a larger school like Buchanan been different from teaching at Fresno Christian?

Lee: I think being at a small school you really get to know your kids well. I felt like I got to know all of my kids at Fresno Christian so much better than at a public school because the class rooms are small. At Buchanan there are kids in my class that I know by name and recognize them and know something about them but you really don’t get to know them in any depth. At Fresno Christian it’s a little different because you’re around the kids daily and because there are fewer numbers you get to know them as a person.

Skyler: Besides teaching what do you do with your free time now?

Lee: I really love camping we have a little pop up trailer and I think camping is really an excellent way of getting the family together because you’re out there and your away from the TV and get a chance to spend time with each other and also to really enjoy the nature that God has given us. We also love sports. As you know I’m a big 49er and Giants fan and I’m a big Bulldog fan. I attend a lot of sporting activities. All of my kids love sports and my wife loves sports. Also my daughter is playing basketball at Fresno Pacific,  so I go watch her play and my youngest daughter is still playing tennis at Buchanan. Now that I’m teaching at Buchanan it’s very easy to support her and her tennis. Besides camping, we just love vacationing when we have the opportunity.

Skyler: How would you say your life is different now than it was a year ago?

Lee: I would say that the stress is a lot less because my work load isn’t quite the same. I would say that because I’m part time I’m able to do more things with my family. It just gives me more time to spend around my family. I would also say that as I mentioned earlier I don’t have the same connection with God daily that I had while I was at Fresno Christian. You guys have a very special opportunity at FC to worship the Lord daily in a school setting and I miss that. I still get into my bible and am with the Lord that way but worshiping daily with His family is something that I don’t get as much.

Skyler: Lastly do you have any parting wisdom for the students at FC?

Lee: I would say that the students should not take lightly what privileges they have at a Christian school because sometimes you don?t realize what you have until it’s gone. I would tell the students there to enjoy and make the most of their opportunities at Fresno Christian because Fresno Christian not only offers an opportunity to be with the lord but because it’s a smaller school you can participate in so many activities… There are so many activities that are available there at Fresno Christian that kids should get involved in. Get involved in those things because you only go through high school one time and you?ll look back and ask why you didn’t do more.

To find out more about David Lee’s work at FC read Lifelong ambition motivates math teacher.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @skyerklee.

For more features, read the Feb. 27 article, Sophomore discovers musical talent, excels.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline

By |2015-03-02T00:00:00+00:00March 2nd, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Sophomore discovers musical talent, excels

Zachary Passmore combines wit and passion in choral rookie season

IMG_0187rBree Castro

Sophomore tenor Zachary Passmore combines wit and talent as a rookie member of the choir.

While some students fear singing in front of crowds, sophomore Zachary Passmore stepped up to perform in the high school choir. Though this is his rookie season in choir, he is not too embarrassed to sing in front of crowds. He also has a talent in playing the bass guitar and plans to join worship team next year.

“I’ve played the bass for about two years and I sometimes play at my church,” Passmore said. “I learned from my bass teacher Ben at the Gottschalk’s Music Center. I learned how to play it because my parents said I needed to learn an instrument.”

Passmore enjoys choir and hopes to learn more about what his voice can do.

“I joined choir this year because I needed VPA {Visual Performing Arts} credits to graduate high school,” Passmore said. “I thought about doing choir next year as well, but I will probably do worship team. I enjoy taking the class and learning new things about my voice and singing.”

Choir gives a chance for singers to improve and strengthen their voice. It can also be a way to improve your relationships with other students in the class by sharing a common passion.

“I like it when our class starts getting good at a song and everyone sings it well,” Passmore said. “One of my weaknesses is trying to learn all the honor choir music because it’s stuff I’ve never heard of and is harder. Another weakness is that I’m a tenor and sometimes I can’t hit all the higher notes and I want to work on being able to project my voice so people in back rows can hear me. My strength is not being embarrassed about singing in front of people or large groups.”

Though some people take choir seriously, it can also be fun and a good learning experience.

“I take choir pretty seriously, but I also have fun,” Passmore said. “I look forward going to the Heritage Festival because we go to Disneyland after. Though I have fun now with this class in high school, I think there might be some singing in my future. I look up to Andrew Guthrie, ’15, because though he’s not in choir often, he learns the music fast and does his part for choir.”

His personality is very funny and has a special voice of character and likes to come out sometimes. He is also pretty good at mimicking the sopranos. Zach is very humorous and impersonates the character Mort from Madagascar, but not purposely. Sometimes Mort will ‘come visit us’ randomly. He always comes when it is serious. — Choral director Susan Ainley describing Zach Passmore

Choir teacher Susan Ainley is sent four tenors to honor choir this year. Though the music is extremely difficult for person who has not been in choir long, Passmore decided to do it and she appreciates that he stuck to it even if it is said to be hard and boring.

“Zach has a brother who is a good singer and is part of the Fresno Pacific Choir,” Ainley said. “He is starting to believe in himself as singer and not just his brother. I’ve seen Zach grow in confidence as the school year has progressed and has a good concept of a head voice. The tenor section as the group has developed into a very fine group.”

Ainley enjoys having Passmore in her class and would like to see him try for a solo because she knows he can do it. Zach brings humor and laughter to choir even as the sophomore discovers musical talent in the music department.

“His personality is very funny and has a special voice of character and likes to come out sometimes,” Ainley said. “He is also pretty good at mimicking the sopranos. Zach is very humorous and impersonates the character Mort from Madagascar, but not purposely. Sometimes Mort will ‘come visit us’ randomly. He always comes when it is serious.”

Senior Cole Nale is also in choir and appreciates Passmore’s humor and personality.

“Zach’s strength in choir is rugged good looks along with a little singing,” Nale said. “He just wants to have a good time and enjoy the class. He is always focused on perfecting the song quickly so we can have free time earlier.”

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @NataliaTorres.

For more features, read the Feb. 12 article, Substitue teacher makes the most of her experience.

By |2015-02-27T00:00:00+00:00February 27th, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Serve day unites student body, spreads joy (VIDEO)

IMG_9822Alexis Kalugin | The Feather Online Archive

The second school-wide Serve Day rallies the whole campus to volunteer in multiple places across the city including painting over graffiti near railroad tracks, Feb. 19.

The second annual school-wide serve day took place, Feb. 19. Students signed up for their location of choice earlier in the week during chapel and prayed to leave a positive impact on the community.

The different service sites include: the Community Food Bank, Poverello House, park clean up, Neighborhood Thrift, two graffiti clean up sites, connecting with students at Kepler Elementary School and a yard work group.

The students were assigned their chaperones and buses after a rally like chapel and were encouraged to serve with a joyful heart and spread the love of Christ.

Leadership advisor Vickey Belmont gives insight into the second annual FC serve day.

“After last years first serve day and it being pretty successful, we were already planning on continuing the service,” Belmont said. “We work some of the kinks our from last year and improved in some areas. I think that this year was a great success and I am looking forward to the many more serve days to come.”

Freshman Erin Wilson found serve day to be much more rewarding than she had originally thought.

“I was expecting it to be a lot less fun than it actually was, I thought it was going to be boring but I had a really great time helping out at the Neighborhood Thrift Store,” Wilson said. “I think we were a big help to them we hung up two giant boxes of clothes and I’m really glad the school put this day on.”

Sophomore Julian Castro helped clean up an elderly man’s yard with his friends and enjoyed shining the light of Christ to him and others.

“We mowed his lawn, picked up piles of leaves, and picked up logs and branches from his property. To be honest I had a really great time, even though im not one to enjoy yardwork I found myself workng hard and having fun,” Castro said. “I do feel like we made an impact on his life because it makes him feel better when he looks out his window and sees a freshly cleaned yard. I think it’s the least we could do for him.

Junior Maddie Luginbill was in the graffiti clean up group and found that serving with friends makes the ward work fun and worth it.

“Last year I was at the food bank and this year I was with a lot of my friends and I was more interested in painting than I was about bagging food so I was more excited to help out this year,” Luginbill said. “The chaperone told us that by this time next week all the graffiti would be back up and it made me sad that people don’t respect the community but we poured ourselves into our work and it was worth it.”

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @gaby_siqueiros.

For more features, read the Feb. 24 article, Speaker educates on body language, power of communication.

IRL shooter: The game or real life?

IRL-Shooter-Imageirlshooter.com

IRL Shooter is a small step in the innovation and advancement of gaming.

With the popularity of first-person shooter video games sky rocketing, innovators have looked for ways to integrate new technology into game play.

It has been dreamt of since the birth of video games: a completely immersible realm in which our actions control the character.

The team at IRL Shooter thought, why not make ourselves the main character? The Australian based company was initially funded by the website kickstarted. IRL stands for ‘In Real Life’. The uniqueness of IRL is that instead of offering a two dimensional experience, you are completely immersed in the game.

IRL offers different story lines to play in, such as the most popular, Patient Zero. Patient Zero is an original story written by founders of IRL, Dave Leadbetter and Drew Hobbs, game players have to escape a zombie hoarde all while trying to find their way to the next area of the warehouse.

All of this is completed with a 8.4 pound AK 47 replica, combat helmet, and screaming audio pumped into each combat zone. Many of the escape routes and paths to the next area are not very complicated when viewed from a controlled environment. But with all of the extra stimulants, few participants recognize the ease.

One of the most vital pieces of the operation is the location of the game. IRL was founded in Australia, the company’s brick and mortar location is in a suburb outside of Melbourne.

A specific lay out is created in order to simulate the video game atmosphere and provide a challenging environment. Countless hours are spent in the writing and creation phase of each storyline, the most popular and most successful at the moment is, Patient Zero.

IRL has tapped into a market that is considered the final frontier of gaming and live action role playing. Participating in a game is one thing but when you become the character and are immersed into a storyline with goals, objectives and moral decisions to make, people leave behind everything else in there life and are consumed. — Senior Trevor Beal

Patient Zero is an apocalyptic and zombie infused character quest. The zombie hoard continuously pursues the group of participants while they search for an exit into the next infected area.

The actual game play lasts for about an hour, immediate extraction from the game is available for those that can not continue due to health risks or pure fear.

IRL has tapped into a market that is considered the final frontier of gaming and live action role playing. Participating in a game is one thing but when you become the character and are immersed into a storyline with goals, objectives and moral decisions to make, people leave behind everything else in there life and are consumed.

That is the addicting part of IRL, it offers an escape and happy place to many, even though violence is involved.

Our society continues to modernize without fail, and IRL is just a small step in the innovation and advancement of gaming and also in human nature.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @Beal_2015.

For more news, read the Feb. 20 article, Student Leadership: Serves the Community Food Bank.

By |2015-02-26T00:00:00+00:00February 26th, 2015|Features, Technology, Uncategorized|0 Comments

#SJW2015: Importance of Scholastic Journalism Week (Video)

ChloeAlexis Kalugin | The Feather Online Archive

Juniors Rees Roggenstein and Chloe Mueller share in assembly the importance of scholastic journalism, Feb. 23.

Publication students throughout the nation will be celebrating the art of Journalism during Scholastic Journalism Week, Feb. 22-28. This yearly event, sponsored by the Journalism Education Association (JEA) was created to raise student awareness about their First Amendment rights and civic responsibility.

Scholastic Journalism Week is used to promote the efforts of high school journalism students throughout the nation. This year the JEA has chosen “Our Staff at Work” as the logo to motivate people to see the efforts of student publications and The Feather staff wants to share the importance of scholastic journalism.

National Scholastic Journalism Week was created for the support of the First Amendment which states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

Editor-in-Chief Chloe Mueller gives insight into the celebration of Scholastic Journalism Week and student publications throughout the nation.

“Throughout the school year, various journalism-centered events occur, but this particular event is unique,” Mueller said. “This week delves a layer deeper into journalism and what it means by exploring the First Amendment and its role in the realm of publications.”

National Scholastic Journalism Week was created for the support of the First Amendment which states, ‘Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.’

The Feather will be taking a student survey asking what the campus would like to see on The Feather and will include the results in an info-gram. This year in honor of promoting journalism week, The Feather staff has also created a hashtag for Twitter: #FCJW as well as #SJW2015 which will appear on The Feather’s Storify. Please share why the First Amendment is important to students’ voices today.

To ensure that the school is staying up to date with journalism week, The Feather is putting on a friendly competition. The campus student who tweets and includes #FCJW the most this week, will win a $15 gift card of their choosing.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_sarapeterson.

For more videos, check out Girls soccer hosts Frazier Mountain for D-VI championship (Video).

By |2015-02-25T00:00:00+00:00February 25th, 2015|FC Arts, Features, Uncategorized, Videos 2014-15|0 Comments

Cuddy educates on body language, power of communication

Harvard professor Amy Cuddy shares at San Joaquin Valley Town Hall

IMG_3363Choe Mueller

Harvard graduate Amy Cuddy shares her expertise about body language during the San Joaquin Valley Town Hall, Feb. 18.

As a continuation of the San Joaquin Valley Town Hall Lecture Series, Harvard graduate Amy Cuddy made a pit stop in Fresno to share some of her knowledge, Feb. 18. Row after row in the William Saroyan Theater was filled with listeners, eager to hear what the renowned speaker had to share with them.

As a pretense, I was aware that Cuddy spoke in one of the most viewed, most influential TED Talks online. I had also heard that she worked in the field of Psychology. However, I did not expect such a hands-on, applicable lesson from the Harvard professor.

Before the official speech, Cuddy spent some time with the attending Merit Scholars (various recommended students from schools scattered along the Central Valley) answering personalized questions. From the moment she spoke, it was clear that Cuddy did not let her vast knowledge and academia lead her onto a track that was difficult for audiences slightly less educated on her topic (such as I) to understand. She chose simple wording to explain fascinating phenomenas.

When asked about her realm of study, Cuddy explained her particular field of work within psychology.

“I study normal people; I’m not a clinical psychologist so I don’t take patients,” Cuddy said. “What I do is follow the Scientific Method in a very literal and precise way. For example, I will ask a question and randomly assign participants to one condition or another and then we will study the results.”

As her pre-speech audience was formed of primarily merit students, still enrolled in high school, there was much interest around Cuddy’s work on her college campus. Upon questioning about her methods, Cuddy gave examples of her teaching style – and that of Harvard Business School.

“We teach using the case method, and the students have to read a business case, which someone at Harvard Business School has written,” Cuddy said. “It might be about a traditional business predicament or a more advanced case, but the students are left with a question at the end of each case and are expected to come to class and start a discussion.”

I find it very obvious when someone is scripting their body language, so I wouldn’t advise someone to do that. I think that it’s good to understand what different queues signal. I teach an approach that I developed with some other practitioners, its called ‘Inside-out’, and it’s based upon method acting. So people are much better at projecting real ordinated synchronized body language when they are doing it from a honest place, so they get themselves into that frame of mind. — Amy Cuddy, Harvard professor

While the question-and-answer session orbited around topics such as college and majors, her lecture session was based on a plethora of facts and findings on the topic that Cuddy gravitates towards most: body language.

However, when many hear the phrase ‘body language’, they tend to think of how their movements affect others. On the contrary, the majority of the lecture was focused on how our personal body language can affect us and Cuddy educates on body language.

A major theme was the encouragement of using ‘power stances/positions’, in which the human body becomes large and takes up space (ie., raising your arms to the sky). These positions – as studied in Cuddy’s lab – are directly correlated with a rise in testosterone levels and a plummet in cortisol levels. This balance creates a motivated human being with low stress levels.

Now, while much emphasis was put on positive positioning, Cuddy also warned against ‘faking it until you make it’. Unnatural stances (positive or not) are easy to detect, and can actually have a negative effect. So, rather than forcing yourself into a broad position during a job interview, practice making yourself comfortable in a confident position at home!

Cuddy explains the reasoning behind avoiding false body language, and explains her theory which she calls ‘inside out’.

“I find it very obvious when someone is scripting their body language, so I wouldn’t advise someone to do that,” Cuddy said. “I think that it’s good to understand what different queues signal. I teach an approach that I developed with some other practitioners, its called ‘Inside-out’, and it’s based upon method acting. So people are much better at projecting real ordinated synchronized body language when they are doing it from a honest place, so they get themselves into that frame of mind.”

The next San Joaquin Valley Town Hall will be March 18 when scholars and religious leaders will host a reflection on the Armenian Genocide, discussing issues from reconciliation to contributions to American culture, arts and sciences. The presentation is Man’s Inhumanity to Man … The Last Hundred Years. Look for a review after that session by The Feather staff.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_chloemueller.

For more features, read the Feb. 23 article, Scholastic Journalism Week 2015: Join the discussion.

By |2015-02-24T00:00:00+00:00February 24th, 2015|Community Events, Features, Uncategorized|1 Comment

Deserving cheerleader to receive scholarship

McEnteeEunieadmin | The Feather Online Archive

After leading the FCS cheer program from 1979-2004, Eunie McEntee and her husband Dave have traveled, volunteered at their church and loved on their many grandchildren.

FCS honors long time FCS teacher Eunie McEntee

The adventure of life comes with many pleasant discoveries. Discoveries including places, people, ideas or even objects. The most important discoveries however, are the ones that change lives forever. In this case, that pleasant discovery for the FCS family was Eunie McEntee.

McEntee started the campus cheerleading program in 1979, and has left a legacy ever since, despite her redirection in 2004. Not only did McEntee change the cheer program for the better, she also worked into students lives as well by educating them in Bible and PE. She was also very involved in drama and student activities, teaching leadership for a few years as well.

After many years at FC, McEntee took some time off to go to Belgium with her husband on a missionary trip in 2004. When she returned, she taught for one final semester at FC. Prior to being involved at FC, McEntee took her passion for gymnastics to Clovis High School, founding their gymnastics program in 1972.

As a result of all of her hard work and the impact that she has made on countless numbers of lives, there will be given a $1,000 cheer scholarship in her name at the FC sport award banquet on Feb. 23. Upon McEntee discovering the news about the scholarship, she was very humbled, and wanted nothing more than to shine God’s light through this experience.

“I did not know about this, so I feel very humbled,” McEntee said. “I want to honor the Lord. I feel like I wanted to call it {the scholarship} after Him instead of my name. Thats who I want to be recognized through this.”

McEntee thoroughly enjoyed her years as being the FC cheer coach.

“You want to be the best that you can be, and they really just had high quality girls and they made up their on routines and it was pretty exciting for them,” McEntee said. “So I said, ‘If the Creator of the niverse created that, then thats Who we trust, then thats Who we are going to depend on to create the things that we do. So it was fun to see how God really gave all these gals ideas and they did very well. It was a fun experience!”

There are many different coaching techniques, however, McEntee was unique compared the the normalcy of other coaches. The reason being is that she based everything she did trusting in the Lord and made sure that her girls knew to do the same.

“I think excellence can only be on the standard of what God’s word says. Gods word never changes. We live in a society where they say, ‘okay, here’s your belief, right here… and we move it according to times and changes but God’s truth just stays here. Yes, there will be changes, but God’s standard never changes, so excellence is just based on that,” McEntee said.

“The rules really are God’s word. I like the Phillips translation of I Corinthians 13, ‘This love of which I speak is slow to lose patience – it looks for a way of being constructive. It is not possessive: it is neither anxious to impress nor does it cherish inflated ideas of its own importance. Love has good manners and does not pursue selfish advantage. It is not touchy. It does not keep account of evil or gloat over the wickedness of other people.’ So, when all of your rules are scripture and you can just say it like that, then its never a bunch of rules, its just Gods truth.”

These lessons went on to impact the lives of many, including Trisha Messer, a cheerleader of McEntee in 1987, and now an FC parent of Olivia and Courtney Messer.

“Eunie is a Godly woman who encouraged me to be the best I could be, in life and in cheer,” Messer said. “She did not have a daughter of her own, so the cheerleaders were her daughters. She loved us unconditionally and hoped that we would do the same with our teammates. She is creative, fun and energetic. She loves life and those around her. Eunie is so knowledgeable about God’s Word and is so Christlike in her daily walk with Him.”

Yet another life she has made a tremendous difference in is former FC cheerleader Melanie Wright Swager.

“Mrs. Mac is what we all called her, “Swager said. “She taught us about teamwork. She always said, ‘You’re only strongest as your weakest link,’ which meant we all had to work together, help each other and encourage each other.

“As we got older,” Swager said, “we definitely formed a friendship, though she was still our coach and leader so we always respected her and her ideas and suggestions. Her love and passion for cheerleading was contagious. She taught us hard work and dedication. I have such fond and wonderful memories of all those years.”

There is one person in particular that has been influenced greatly by McEntee and the person that she has become.

Being a Godly woman and teacher doesn’t stop on the cheerleading floor. She (McEntee) challenged the gals to be the best they could be in completing with hundreds of other cheerleaders, in the classroom, in friendships, in their walk with the Lord. — Peggy Thompson, mother of Tricia Messer

Peggy Thompson, mother of Tricia Messer, and best friend of Eunie McEntee. McEntee and Thompson became friends 40 years ago, when they attended Evangelical Free Church, and also became closer while they were pregnant at the same time with their second born sons. Throughout this time, they have gotten to know each other inside and out, and Thompson could not be more grateful for the friendship they share.

“Eunie is a great teacher whether in the classroom, teaching Bible Study or sitting at a table drinking coffee,” Thompson said. “When you are in her presence you are inspired by her high energy, her enthusiasm and love of learning and positive attitude.

“She loves to study and she oozes Godly insight so that challenges me to be the best I can be for the Lord,” Thompson continued. “Eunie is hospitable, a gracious hostess, very giving and helps when their is a need in your life. That’s a true example of a Proverbs 31 woman. She is Godly, of high integrity, loyal, giving, loving, kind and crazy. After 40 years, I can say crazy.”

Being a cheer mom, as well as a close friend of McEntee, Thompson saw multiple sides of Eunie, all of which were the same, Godly woman.

“Being a Godly woman and teacher doesn’t stop on the cheerleading floor, ” Thompson said. “She (McEntee) challenged the gals to be the best they could be in completing with hundreds of other cheerleaders, in the classroom, in friendships, in their walk with the Lord.

“She would challenging the gals in their faith, she always read scripture, gave them insight to life situations, she counseled them if they had issues (today its called drama). She cared and prayed for them even wrote notes of encouragement. She was a positive role model to the gals “walking the talk” Lord first in every minute of the day.”

Her reputation as a cheerleading coach influenced her cheerleaders in a positive aspect, along with her love and passion for the sport.

“Eunie was an awesome coach,” Messer said. “She had a lot of experience in cheer and gymnastics which spilled over into being the best cheer coach ever! She made us practice and learn all that we could about cheer. She took my team to Nationals which was the first time for Fresno Christian. It was an unforgettable experience. She loved her cheerleaders like daughters.”

The Eunie McEntee scholarship is seen as a deserving tribute, especially by former FC cheerleader Heather (Neal) Carr, ’08.

“She was really encouraging,” Carr said. “Mrs. Mac is very upbeat and she shares her love with God with everyone with bible verses and she just makes you feel very encouraged about life.

“I think the Eunie McEntee cheer scholarship is awesome,” Carr said. “I think its great that they’ve come up with for cheer because its expensive. Football has scholarships, basketball has scholarships, but cheer never really gets that recognition, so I think its really cool.”

Thompson and McEntee shared a special bond, and have watched each theory grow as individuals. Seeing all of McEntee’s hard work pay off made Thompson proud to be her friend.

“The scholarship in Eunie’s name is a great honor,” Thompson said. In order to compete for Eunie it was expected to reach for high standards in all phases of life and she exemplified it in her own life. Anyone who desires to be cheerleader and a Godly representative of FCS should vie for this scholarship, wanting nothing but the best to be the person that honors God in leadership, studies, being friendly and respectful to all, cheering together and representing our Christian school well. Eunie McEntee is the No. 1 Cheerleader of Godliness in my books.”

The scholarship will be rewarded to a freshman, sophomore, or junior for the upcoming 2015-’16 cheer season. The winner of this award will be announced at the FC winter sports award banquet, Feb. 23 in Ground Zero at 7 p.m.

With all of McEntee’s involvement at FC during her coaching years, she wishes hopes to be more involved currently, doing anything she can to help out the Eagle community.

“I would love to come back in be more involved in the FC community,” McEntee said. “I used to do a teachers luncheon in the fall, and have them over, and I would maybe like to do something of the sort, and be more involved. I just want to be encouraging that way again. I am just praying, and seeing what doors he opens, and which he shuts.”

History teacher and photo-journalism adviser Kori Friesen, also an FC alumni, has been impacted by McEntee and her joyful presence in the years that she has known her.

“Eunie was the joy of the school,” Friesen said. “She was the practical joker. You could hear her laugh all the way down the hallway. The teachers were a family because she was such an anchor. Having Mrs. Mac as a cheer coach was also always exciting.

“We learned to cheer for a purpose and had a blast in the process,” Friesen continued. “Every Friday we would dress out and perform in rallies. As a cheerleader we would come alongside, support the team, and to be there for them. I have absoluelty great memories of high school, and Eunie was a huge part of that.”

The FC community is encouraged to help honor Eunie McEntee and continue to support the FC cheer program and help a deserving cheerleader to receive scholarship monies.

Eunie McEntee influenced the lives of many. She will always be a part of this FC family, and will be remembered for her Christ-like lifestyle, and outgoing personality. Please be sure to say thank you to her next time you see her–for shaping FC into what it is today.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @ashhasthescoop.

For more features, read the Feb. 20 article, Fresno hosts horror movie, to be released nationally.

By |2015-02-23T00:00:00+00:00February 23rd, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|4 Comments

Scholastic Journalism Week 2015: Join the discussion

StaffSJWJeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

As The Feather has been headlining student events, featuring stories about Homecoming, issues of social equality and the sport season beginnings, this week the tables are reversed. To promote the importance of school publications, the Journalism Education Association (JEA) has sponsored the annual Scholastic Journalism Week, Feb. 22-28.

The organization encourages student journalists to raise awareness, promoting its significance to the community. Along with a student created poster template, the JEA has listed several ideas for student and publication adviser participants.

While the event is geared towards those apart of a educational journalism program, community members, including readers and students can get involved. Throughout the week, The Feather will be watching social media including Twitter and Instagram, by creating a hashtag: #FCJW as well as #SJW2015 which will appear in a Storify collection.

National Scholastic Journalism Week was created for the support of the First Amendment which states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

Responses from staff writers, editors and advisers, were documented in order to highlight the significance of journalism education not just nationwide, but locally.

The Feather wants to encourage students and readers to submit their opinions in the comment section on the effects of journalism and why seeking out and reporting the news is important. Please consider adding to or joining Scholastic Journalism Week 2015: Join the discussion.

Relevance of the world
Emily Ladd, ’16
Feb. 27, 2015

“What’s going on in the world is extremely relevant, especially seeing as everyone lives in it. Journalists and people alike should seek news, but journalists make what’s important known and more accessible to everyone, finding all facts they can. Journalism raises awareness for the events around us.”

Freedom of speech: A beautiful gift
Rees Roggenstein, ’16
Feb. 27, 2015

“Scholastic Journalism Week is incredibly important, and not just to journalists and those involved with media. It exemplifies the right to freedom of speech that we as Americans have been afforded, which is a gift that is not freely given. It is a time to express one’s opinion in complete and brutal honesty. It is a time to truly express one’s freedom of speech. This is a week that all who practice freedom of speech can celebrate such a beautiful gift.”

Epitome of student journalism
Kathryn Damschen, ’15
Feb. 27, 2015

“Scholastic Journalism Week is the epitome of student journalism. It is a week solely dedicated to the media, news, and information that we gather each and every day. I personally believe it is a great endeavor to be a part of, as it brings awareness to what we do as a whole (being a part of a journalism staff). It is critical to be knowledgable of the work you do and why you’re apart of such a ting, if anything. My thoughts are, what good is doing something if you don’t know what it is or why you’re doing it?”

News 24/7
Michael Fu, ’16
Feb. 27, 2015

“The importance of journalist went out to seek the new and report it is because without the motivation to seek the news or to report them. The society has no way other than having the eye witness the even that happened in front of them to discovered the things happen in school, town or the whole nation. The journalist who seek the news allow the people to connect each other and form a bobble where everyone know what is going on in this very moment. Without the journalist, the people have to look for the news 24/7 by themselves in order to keep up with the world. As a conclusion, we as a journalist who seek the news and report them allows others to be aware of things happened around them and bring the community closer than it was before.”

[/fusion_builder_column]

StaffSJW15Jeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

 

Face and fix society
Toby Pan, ’15
Feb. 27, 2015

“America is not the only country that have the freedom of speech stated in the Constitution, but it is one of the few countries that have this important right widely applied to their people on a daily basis. Unlike some of the countries whose media industries are controlled by the government, the journalists here are endowed with considerable freedom to express their own opinions. On top of that, the journalists’ good work ensured that the public are informed of what’s happening domestically and globally; so that Americans, although have made a lot of mistakes, can always face and fix their society on time.”

Spreading the Word
Chloe Mueller, Editor-in-Chief
Feb. 26, 2015

“On campus, I don’t think journalism is viewed as relative to the lives of students unless they are directly involved with the class. This week gives us – as journalists – a chance to spread the word and importance of journalism to our classmates who don’t prioritize it.”

Exposing the Truth
Justin Houts, Writer
Feb. 26, 2015

“It’s important for journalists to seek the news and report it; by doing so we can insure that our rights and enforce rules and laws. It’s news reporting that exposed Watergate, the Clinton scandal, and many other historical events that wouldn’t have otherwise been made known had they not been exposed by journalists. The U.S. is one of the few countries that allows it’s citizens to speak freely about their beliefs and ideas, and if we don’t use this opportunity to the fullest potential its being wasted and not taken as the privilege it truly is.”

Week of opportunities
Olivia Quebe, ’16
Feb. 23, 2015

“I see Scholastic Journalism Week as an opportunity to make people aware of the importance of journalism. It is a way to get the students involved and informed not only during this week, but for the rest of the year. I’m excited to see the responses of the students and special events to come.”

Educate ourselves
Trevor Beal, News Editor
Feb. 23, 2015

“In my opinion it is important for journalists of all ages to seek out the real news because without that key characteristic we risk becoming mindless believers of mass media. Our job is to educate ourselves and others in current affairs and how we are affected by them.”

Its a big deal
Sydney Belmont, ’17
Feb. 23, 2015

“Scholastic Journalism Week is a huge deal. Students are encouraged to promote journalism. It is a way to get the student body involved and informed about what is going on during the week. I am looking forward to all the excitement involved in this week.”

Journalism happenings
Natalia Torres, ’16
Feb. 23, 2015

“Scholastic Journalism week is the week to promote journalism. Students who are already in journalism should be informing others about what journalism is about and about joining journalism. This way the student body can be updated on what events are happening as they are happening.”

A journalist’s perspective
John Dooman, Reviews Editor
Feb. 23, 2015

“Every journalists needs to report on certain stories to provide their own take on it. Two journalists would report a story in their own way from their own, unique point of view. This allows readers and/or viewers to come to their own conclusions on how news is covered.”

Club recognition
Jenny King, ’17
Feb. 23, 2015

“Scholastic Journalism Week is really exciting; as a club on the campus, this week is a recognition of the hard work that the staff puts in. It’s a fun way for students and staffers to be involved in their school newspaper.”

Effective reporting
Sara Peterson, Editor-in-Chief
Feb. 23, 2015

“Journalists need to report because it gives themselves and people around them insight into what is happening locally or in the world. Our job as journalist is to effectively report and share these stories with our fellow man.”

Think, Engage, Teach
Greg Stobbe, Publications Adviser
Feb. 23, 2015

“Journalists, and I’m being inclusive of Feather reporters, have an obligation to seek out and report the news, profiles, stories and issues that are important to their constituencies {peers} and community. This is an obligation, not whether they ‘feel like it.’ The Feather staff in particular is charged to present to the greater Fresno community who Fresno Christian citizens are and represent them. The journalists on this campus need to bear witness and independently write and comment on the news and the controversies, its peoples’ failures and success, struggles and the stories of overcoming, calling into question when peers are not morally or ethically responsible and report the accomplishments and/or consequences. The Feather staff must give fair, accurate perspective to the goings on, in and around the Fresno Christian community. They are not just to watch but to stimulate conversation so as to engage fellow students to listen, dialogue and act on truth so that the community not only knows it but also uses it in relationship. Think responsible. Be engaged. Teach the tools of citizenship.”

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @rynnking_.

For more features, read the Feb. 20 article, Fresno hosts horror movie, to be released nationally.

By |2015-02-23T00:00:00+00:00February 23rd, 2015|Community Events, FC Arts, Features, Uncategorized|1 Comment

Fresno hosts horror movie, to be released nationally

unnamed-1Courtesy The Gallows

FIlm producers Travis Cluff and Chris Lofing have brought Fresno-based horror film to the big screen.

Although Fresno is conveniently located in the Central Valley, between entertainment capitals such as San Francisco and Los Angeles, the city itself is rarely considered a prime area for national attention. However, the minds of Travis Cluff and Chris Lofing have brought together a film that takes place primarily on the streets of Fresno.

The film, which is set to be released July 10, is titled The Gallows. The movie piqued the interest of many major film labels, but was eventually bought by New Line Cinema. The piece also has been worked on by Jason Blum, the producer of franchises such as ‘Paranormal Activity’ and ‘The Purge’.

The Gallows will fall under the horror genre, and focuses on an eerie event that supposedly took place in the midwest. Because of this, a few of the scenes were filmed in parts of Nebraska. However, the primary landscape seen in this film belongs to Fresno.

The purpose behind the setting is co-producer, Cluff’s association with Fresno. Cluff discussed the convenience of Fresno’s location for filming.

“I currently live in Fresno with my family,” Cluff said. “I met Chris when he was here filming for school in LA, and we decided to come to Fresno to film because it is less expensive to film here. Fresno is in close proximity to Hollywood, but far enough away to have some fun.”

Areas that have been utilized throughout filmmaking include everywhere from local high schools (such as Clovis West and Madera High) to the Veterans Memorial Auditorium in Downtown Fresno.

The pair of directors have done one previous film together. The project was titled Gold Fools and was a faith-centered movie. Now, the two are formulating a horror movie, which may seem like a stark contrast from their old interests.

Lofing discussed how the duo jumped between genres, and how finances affected this choice.

“We wanted something cheap,” Lofing said. “We knew that we didn’t have much money, and the horror genre fit the budget. Horror also fits well in the market place, selling well overseas.”

Lofing goes on to share how his personal background shaped his work with The Gallows.

“We thought a ‘Paranormal Activity’ style movie would be cool. The story is based on events from where I’m from [/fusion_builder_column]

[Nebraska],” Lofing said. “And when I was making my first movie project, I dabbled in horror. It has always interested me.”

Although the movie is debuting in July, it has been worked on for many years and is a long awaited project. The pair began writing the film back in 2011, and shot a promo trailer the same year. A good chunk of the movie was filmed during 2012, and now, in 2015, the crew is putting together the final pieces.

The Gallows will be released nationwide in over 2,500 theaters. Depending on the overall success of the film, Lofing and Cluff may continue down the road of filmmaking. The two may further delve into horror, or may even try their luck in the field of television.

“The Gallows has been a long road,” Cluff said. “While we have enjoyed ourselves, we are, of course, clad to wrap it up. We are not entirely sure what we are moving onto next, that really depends on how well the movie does.”

For more features, read the Feb. 12 article, Substitute teacher makes the most of her experience.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_chloemueller.

By |2015-02-20T00:00:00+00:00February 20th, 2015|Community Events, Features, Movies/TV, Uncategorized|7 Comments

Student of the Month: Villanueba pursues passion for animal science, values relationships

Over the last few years Villanueba has become immersed in student life, school work and various extracurricular activities including Color Guard, Women's Ensemble and several sports.Austin Insco

Over the last few years Villanueba has become immersed in student life, school work and various extracurricular activities including Color Guard, Women’s Ensemble and several sports.

Senior applies herself to studies and extracurricular activities

Every month The Feather will highlight one student recommended by a teacher and voted upon by Feather staff members. Students are chosen depending upon several factors including and not limited to good grades, class engagement, positive attitude and special extracurricular activities.

The Student of the Month for February is senior Summer Villanueba, chosen by English and Yearbook teacher, Andrea Donaghe. Donaghe says she selected Villanueba for persistence in her school work and the quality of her character.

“Summer has an incredibly strong work ethic, completing all assignments on time and well done,” Donaghe said. “It is rare that I ask Summer to resubmit work. She has valid opinions and conveys them well in her writings and essays. As a student here at FC, Summer holds the ideals and qualities that this school strives for. Whether it is in my English class, twirling her flag for Color Guard or worshiping in Chapel, Summer is a true example of pursuing excellence.”

Villanueba joined the FC community as a 7th grader after attending Mountain View Christian throughout elementary school. Over the last few years Villanueba has become immersed in student life, school work and various extracurricular activities including Color Guard, Women’s Ensemble and several sports.

Summer says that while she is often preoccupied by these activities, there is a certain joy and contentment to be found in a life full of commitment.

“Yeah I’m busy most of the time, but I like to be busy,” Villanueba said. “I like to have things to do because I don’t always have the opportunity to spend time with the people I want to because their busy too. Instead of me sitting at home doing nothing I would rather be here doing something.”

Villanueba’s extracurriculars coincide with her own personal interests making passion for these activities natural.

Music has played a considerable role throughout Villanueba’s childhood up to her present involvement in Women’s Ensemble. As a young child Villanueba took part in baby pageants and attended special classes to enrich her musical talent. Throughout the years, programs at both Mountain View and FC have served to create an infinity toward the musical world. Although, Villanueba admits that her appreciation for the art was a slow developing process.

“At first when I was younger I didn’t much care for it {music} because it was like I had to do it for school,” Villanueba said. “But when I came to Fresno Christian where they had electives, where I got to choose what I wanted to do then it became: this is what I like to do. That’s how I first started to like music.”

“Summer has an incredibly strong work ethic, completing all assignments on time and well done. It is rare that I ask Summer to resubmit work. She has valid opinions and conveys them well in her writings and essays. As a student here at FC, Summer holds the ideals and qualities that this school strives for. Whether it is in my English class, twirling her flag for Color Guard or worshiping in Chapel, Summer is a true example of pursuing excellence.”–Andrea Donaghe 

In addition to Ensemble, Villanueba has taken up Color Guard as a sport of choice. Though she had, had no prior experience until junior year, Villanueba soon became a dedicated member of the team.

“Color guard has been the one sport where I feel like I don’t have to worry about people pushing me too hard or being too aggressive,” Villanueba said. “It’s just a thing that I know I can do. I’ve tried other sports, but Color Guard has just been the one that’s stuck.

Despite a loaded academic and extracurricular schedule, Villanueba, manages to make time for her interests outside of the school setting, one of which is animals.

From a young age, Villanueba was exposed to the animal kingdom through her older brother who worked at a local pet shop. Due to these interactions Villanueba developed a love for all creatures both ordinary and exotic. She currently owns a blue nosed pit bull, two tabby cats, a shih tzu and a Mexican King snake.

“I always had animals in my life and I guess I always felt I had a connection with them,” Villanueba said. “I was the type of kid that cried when Lassie died or if there was a movie where an animal got hurt I was always emotionally involved with it. It’s super important to treat animals well because sometimes their species won’t last that long otherwise.”

She hopes to take this compassion for animals to a professional level after high school, perusing an animal science degree at Fresno State University, attending Fresno Pacific University to continue animal science research and eventually becoming a surgical vet.

In order to gain experience for her future and out of a sheer fascination and compassion for the animal kingdom, Villanueba volunteers her time to organizations such as the SPCA and the Waterhouse Animal Hospital.

“For me I think it’s important to volunteer at shelters because it is something that I’m getting involved with in my career in the future,” Villanueba said. “For others it could be a way to help the community. It’s a good way to serve and get experience.”

When Villanueba has time that is not devoted to school, extracurriculars or animal care, she enjoys spending quality time with friends and with her boyfriend. In addition, she dabbles in poetry, creative writing, art and video games.

“I occasionally like to do artsy kinds of stuff,” Villanueba said. “I’ll draw pictures or I’ll write poetry. I’ll make stories up just to pass the time. Other than that I love to play video games.”

Long time friend and alumna Miriam Dewolf, ’14, says that Villanueba displays a unique ability to both maintain a calm demeanor and simultaneously remain focused on the academic sphere.

“Summer is laid-back and lazy, but at the same time dedicated and driven,” DeWolf said. “She is caring and loyal and willing to drop everything to help out with people she cares about. She’s honest. If you ask her ?does this dress make me look fat?? she’ll honestly say ‘yes it does now take it off.'”

Blog Editor Emily Ladd, ’16, considers Villanueba to have the likeness of an older sibling due to her honest and caring nature.

“Summer is kind of like a really cool older sister figure,” Ladd said. “She’s hilarious and fun to hang out with and play with. She’s also honest and always there for you.”

Villanueba values friendship as a high priority and often organizes get-togethers for the simple purpose of bonding.

“To me my friends are my family,” Villanueba said. “I have girl sleepover parties or I’ll take them to Disneyland or to Six Flags or Beach Boardwalk. All of that type of stuff, because these are the people I want to spend my life with. They’re pretty much my family.”

For more Student of the Month, read the Jan. 23, Poojan Gopal strives toward profession in mechanical engineering.

For more features, read the Feb. 18 article, New academic installment creates environment for change.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather and Instagram @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @skylerlee.

 

By |2015-02-19T00:00:00+00:00February 19th, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

FC community invited to aid Community Food Bank, Feb. 21

Screen Shot 2015-02-18 at 8.32.36 AMFresno Community Food Bank

Juliana Rosik, ’16, first purposed the project to the FC community. Rosik mentioned the idea not only because she was obligated to do so for a leadership position but because she believes that service coincides with God’s ultimate will for the body of Christ.

Leadership Student suggests idea to help the food bank

Students and their families are encouraged to offer their services at Fresno’s Community Food Bank from 7-11 a.m. as part of the organizations 10,000 Hour Volunteer-A-Thon. This event aims to complete a total of 10,000 hours of service throughout the course of four non-consecutive volunteer days: Feb. 7, Feb. 21, March 7 and March 21.

Community Food Bank has been in commission since 1992 and currently feeds over 220,000 needy San Joaquin residents a month from throughout its multiple locations in Fresno, Madera and Kings County.

Juliana Rosik, ’16, first purposed the project to the FC community. Rosik mentioned the idea not only because she was obligated to do so for a leadership position but because she believes that service coincides with God’s ultimate will for the body of Christ.

“Initially I was making this service project for a director position that I have in my leadership class,” Rosik said. “But in the end I realized that I really wanted more service projects at the school. It’s something that’s really important to me. Service is important as a Christian and also just to be a part of your community so I think giving people opportunities to serve is a really good idea.”

While at the bank, participants will aid in sorting and packaging food for the needy. This is of upmost importance considering one out of three children in the San Joaquin Valley struggle daily to find adequate nutrition.

Leadership advisor, Robert Foshee says that the Community Food Bank provides a unique and simple way to serve the people of Fresno and invite others to do so as well.

“The Community Food Bank does so much in the valley for people who don’t really have a lot of stuff and they need a lot of help to keep things running,” Foshee said. “I know Juliana has a heart for the Food Bank and so she brought it up. You can go with friends, with family. It doesn?t have to be with someone from FC. It can be anyone that you know so I think it’s just a great opportunity to give back on a day where maybe you might sleep in otherwise.”

Jenny King, ’17, plans on attending the event in order to both obtain hours for CSF and future college transcripts as well as aid the less fortunate. She encourages others to bring friends and family members.

“Well first of all I enjoy doing service projects and helping out with the community,” King said. “It’s also good because I can put it on my college transcript. I?m also doing it because it counts for CSF service hours. Also I think it will be fun to go and hang out with my friends who are going. So if you have friends that may be interested in going make sure to invite them because it will be more fun that way.”

“The Community Food Bank does so much in the valley for people who don’t really have a lot of stuff and they need a lot of help to keep things running. I know Juliana has a heart for the Food Bank and so she brought it up. You can go with friends, with family. It doesn’t have to be with someone from FC. It can be anyone that you know so I think it’s just a great opportunity to give back on a day where maybe you might sleep in otherwise.”–Robert Foshee

To become involved in the 10,000 Hour Volunteer-A-Thon, students and adults must sign the school registration sheet as well as acquire and fill out a release form by the day of the event. Individuals who do not adequately complete this procedure will not be allowed to participate in the 10,000 Hour Volunteer?A-Thon.

Fresno’s Community Food Bank is located at 3403 E. Central Ave., in southwest Fresno. For more information, contact Juliana Rosik in person or via twitter @julesrosik.

For more news, read the Feb. 13 article, Student Leadership: Serve Day approaches

Follow The Feather via Twitter and Instagram: @thefeather and @thefeatheronlilne. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @skylerklee.

By |2015-02-18T00:00:00+00:00February 18th, 2015|Community Events, Features, Leadership, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

New academic installment creates environment for change

Academic Lab was designed to help students with low grades have more time to study and focus. Jeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

Academic Lab was designed to help students with low grades have more time to study and focus.

As the second semester of the 2014-2015 school year comes to a comfortable cushion of normalcy, the teachers and faculty awaken the students with an abrupt announcement of a mandatory Academic Lab.

Director of Academics, Michael Fenton talks about the reasoning behind the decision to start an academic lab.

“We don’t want students who are behind in their school work to stay there,” Fenton said. “We wanted to think of the best way to help them be able to utilize opportunities such as this one, to work on the grades they have in order to strive for better ones.”

Some of the students are openly on board with the whole premise of the situation, such as Devin Jakusz, ’15.

“I think it’s a good way for students to get homework help,” Jakusz said. “Our focus is on getting missing assignments finished on time.”

There are also some students not completely thrilled with the whole idea of going to a mandatory after school session, due to having poor grades.

Junior Marisa Jonigian shares her thoughts on Academic Lab.

“I think if kids wanted to get good grades, they would,” Jonigian said. “They shouldn’t be forced to go to some after school hang out for half an hour – where they probably wouldn’t do the work anyways – for making the choices they made; it was their choice.”

Fenton goes on to explain the grand purpose behind the academic labs, and how he believes they will benefit the student body.

This change is impacting students, sports teams, drama clubs, music departments, and any other campus group that you can think of. Parents seem to be giving positive feedback, so it would seem that this new installment is here to stay. — Superintendent Jeremy Brown

“We have completed something that forces the conversation in February instead of waiting until it’s too late in May when some of our students are on the verge of graduation,” Fenton says. “This way students are able to graduate with achieving the intention of graduating with good grades. We want to hold students accountable for improving their grades.”

There are three main administrators who are on board with this whole endeavor: Amy Deffenbacher, Michelle Warkentin and Michael Fenton.

Superintendent Jeremy Brown is excited about the lab and believes the cause is beneficial as well. The faculty is doing their best to get the whole school involved. Teachers are involved, the athletic department is involved, etc.

This change is impacting students, sports teams, drama clubs, music departments, and any other campus group that you can think of. Parents seem to be giving positive feedback, so it would seem that this new installment is here to stay.

If students have a grade of a D or an F by any Tuesday at 3 p.m., they are required to participate in the Academic Labs held on Wednesday or Thursday. The student gets the option of which day they choose to attend. On Wednesdays, the session start at 3:05 and goes until 3:35, and on Thursdays, from 2:55 until 3:25.

Those in charge of this new opportunity view it as a good way to keep students from having unacceptable grades and getting them on track for things like college and the real world.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @kedamschen.

For more features, read the Feb. 12 article, Substitue teacher makes the most of her experience.

By |2015-02-17T00:00:00+00:00February 17th, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Substitue teacher makes the most of her experience

Whitney Nickerson serves as Bible teacher

IMG_7064FC file photo

Not only is Nickerson a substitute teacher for FC, but she also subs for schools around Clovis Unified.

Many people here on the FC campus make a tremendous impact. Among those people is Whitney Nickerson, substitute teacher at FC. Nickerson graduated from Buchanan High School with the class of 2008, and later went on to earn a degree from Fresno State in Animal science, specializing in Dairy Science.

Nickerson has been working in place of junior high Bible teacher Matthew Weimer while he is home recuperating from a tragic loss. She has loved the opportunity so far and has learned a lot from the experience.

“I wanted to be in a Christian environment,” Nickerson said. “So far I love it! This experience has been amazing! I have learned so much already and I continue to learn everyday. I love everything about coming to work here.”

Not only is Nickerson a substitute teacher for FC, but she also subs for schools around Clovis Unified. She aspires to become a teacher one day as well as running her own cow/calf operation at home. Working with cows is one of her dreams, and something she loves doing with her husband in her free time.

“In my free time I like doing anything outdoors,” Nickerson said. “I love riding my horses in gymkhana events, but mostly I love taking them to the mountains and going on trail rides. My husband and I love to hunt and regularly take our two German Shorthaired Pointers, Bubba Gump and Jenny, named after characters in the movie Forrest Gump, pheasant hunting up north.”

Nickerson goes on to explain her interest in cattle and its roots in her family.

“We love taking care of animals and have lots animals at home,” Nickerson said. “We are currently raising three Holstein calves that will help us start up our own cattle company which has been my dream (as well as my late father’s) for many years.”

Senior Justin Porter thoroughly enjoys Nickerson as a sub and appreciates what she does.

“Nickerson is a enjoyable and capable substitute teacher,” Porter said. “She engages with the class and also maintains a proper authority structure, and she likes horses a lot.”

One of her seventh grade first period Bible students, Lindsay Weimer, is very thankful for the time Nickerson has spent with the class.

“I really like Mrs. Nickerson as a teacher, it is very different to have her as a teacher, rather than my dad [/fusion_builder_column]

[previous teacher Matthew Weimer] but it is nice,” Lindsay said. “She talks about her horses and cows a lot.”

Matthew Weimer will return fourth quarter to relieve Nickerson of her substitute role. However, until then, The Feather staff encourages you to say thank you for all she has done!

Follow the Feather via Instagram and Twitter: @thefeather and @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @ashhasthescoop.

For more features, read the Feb. 4 article, Feather Highlights: Frame Rate.

By |2015-02-12T00:00:00+00:00February 12th, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Mentorship programs develops relationships within students

This program, starting with Sister to Sister, has been continued now for over, eight years, and is run by junior high science teacher, Terry Richards and history teacher, Hallie Rojeski.Skyler Lee

This program, starting with Sister to Sister, has been continued now for over, eight years, and is run by junior high science teacher, Terry Richards and history teacher, Hallie Rojeski.

HS/JH Friendships, positive interactions

Brother to Brother and Sister to Sister are mentorship programs made specifically to mentor junior highers through an upperclassman.

This program, starting with Sister to Sister, has been continued now for over, eight years, and is run by junior high science teacher, Terry Richards and history teacher, Hallie Rojeski. Each share the passion to help counsel these junior highers with people who have been through similar circumstances.

The Brother to Brother program is a more recent installment of the two, continuing now for five years. Richards has grown the program through the years by raising money, by collecting recyclables from class rooms.

Brother to Brother

“I like seeing all of the guys at lunch talking to each other, and the fellowship that goes on there,” Richards said. “I like seeing the younger guys involved with the older guys. What inspired me to start the Brother to Brother program, was that for a long time there was a Sister to Sister program, done by a class of girls. I always thought, why isn’t there something for the boys? Nothing ever happened, and finally I said that I have to do something for the boys, Then I asked myself, how can I pay for this? But then I realize that I could collect cans and bottles for money.”

Richards, being the founder of Brother to Brother at FC is responsible for all of the fun engaging activities that occur in Brother to Brother, by collecting bottles and cans to turn in for money on his own time.

The school has also put bins in every classroom that are to collect bottles and cans for this very purpose. No money comes from the school, and a select number of luncheons are free.

Students in Brother to Brother and Sister to Sister enjoyed their last luncheon with their older brother or sister on Dec. 2, to end the first semester before Christmas Break.

Seventh grader Logan Lewis is currently in the Brother to Brother, with older brother Collin Winegarden, ’15. Lewis enjoys the program and looks forward to joining the program next semester.

“My favorite experience in Brother to Brother would have to be going to lunch with my older brother,” Lewis said. “It’s pretty fun to go off campus. My older brother is Colin Winegarden. I plan to join the program again next semester. I would also encourage others to join the system. It’s really fun to meet a high schooler and become friends with them.”

Seventh grader Raffi Mazmanian was also in the program, and will also be joining next year, because of his good experience this semester.

“My favorite experience this year with Brother to Brother, would be hanging out with my older brother, and getting the chance to meet him and talk,” Mazmanian said. “I also liked to eat lunch with them. I am going to join Brother to Brother next year. I would tell others to join next year, because it’s cool to meet a new person and to hang out with.”

Along with the free luncheons provided, including Panda Express, Taco Bell, students who participate in this activity, whether they be in junior high, an underclassmen or upperclassmen, are the few in the school (other than CJSF, CSF and Seniors) that are allowed at certain times to go off campus for lunch. These events provide a fun bonding time for older brothers or sisters and their corresponding younger brother or sister.

Junior Justin Houts, older brother of Mazmanian, enjoyed spending time with the younger brothers as well as older brothers.

“My favorite part of Brother to Brother was getting to know my brother Raffi better,” Houts said. “I liked getting to spend time with him and get to grow spiritually with him. It was fun to get closer as friends. My favorite experience with him would have to be when we would go to imperial with Tim Nyberg and his brother. It was good to talk about everyday stuff. I would definitely encourage other high schoolers to join next semester. All things aside from putting things on your resume, it’s a good fun experience you can do. You only are in high school once, so might as well live up the experience while you still can.”

Winegarden, older brother of Lewis, also enjoys getting to know his younger brother as well going off campus for lunch.

“The thing I most enjoy about Brother to Brother is the experience of getting to partner with a junior higher and going off campus for lunch,” Winegarden said. “I won’t be able to join next year because I’m a senior, but I think others should join it because being in it as an older brother or a younger brother is great, it helps on both sides socially. It’s just a fun thing to do. My favorite experience of this year is when we went to Wendy?s and my younger brother ate two frostys at once.”

Sister to Sister

While Rojeski is the current advisor of Sister to Sister, the program has been around since 2008. Previous FC teacher including Molly Sargent and Natalie Douty ran the program prior to Rojeski. As the program did close down for a couple of years, Todd Bennett, former Principle, asked Rojeski to start it back up again.
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“What I enjoy most about the program is getting to know that high school kids again after having them in class,” Rojeski said. “I also like providing what the junior high students really want and desire. The most enjoyable luncheon was the last one we had when parents provided food for us. It’s always good to see the interaction between kids having a good time.”

This program is also funded by collecting bottles and cans, led by Richards. Sister to Sister also has off campus lunches and free luncheons. Seventh grader Elizabeth Hinshaw, younger sister of Skyler Lee, appreciates getting to know other high schoolers as well as students her own age.

“I enjoy Sister to Sister because you get to spend time with people you don’t know, and you get to meet new people,” Hinshaw said. “My favorite experience this year was the luncheon before Christmas break. I might join again next year. I would also encourage other people to join because you get to meet new people that you might not know, and you get to know high schoolers better.”

Hinshaw’s older sister, Lee, enjoys the time she spends with her younger sister as well as the program as a whole.

“I enjoy Sister to Sister, just because it’s a great time to interact with someone that you probably wouldn’t talk to otherwise,” Lee said. “It’s also a great opportunity to impact someone’s life, and just get to know someone that you might not have met before. It was always great to get to go off campus and get the chance to talk to everyone in a group and see how junior highers interact with each other. I would encourage other people to join, just because as far as impacting people and spreading kindness to people, it’s a great opportunity to help others.”

Sign-ups begin next year for this program. When the time comes around next semester, visit room 629 to sign up for Brother to Brother, and room 628 for Sister to Sister programs.

For more features, read the Feb. 11 article, A day in the life of an FC secretary.

Follow The Feather via Twitter and Instagram: @thefeather and @thefeatheronlilne. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @skylerklee.

By |2015-02-11T00:00:00+00:00February 11th, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

A day in the life of an FC secretary

IMG_8597Jeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

Warkentin is a long-time veteran of the office, she became a full time employee of FC in 1984, and has excelled in her many vital roles.

Many vital roles in our school’s daily operations go unnoticed and unappreciated. Especially, the position of high school secretary. Vickey Belmont and Brenda Warkentin have been a dynamic duo at the position for the last four years.

Belmont and Warkentin’s daily tasks in the high school office range from making school wide announcements to enforcing dress code policy. Without their action our school could become ill-informed about important events and dates.

Belmont comments on her colleague’s work ethics and managements skills.

“Mrs. {Brenda} Warkentin is a very organized individual,” Belmont said.”She finds a place for everything, continually orders all supplies needed by school personnel and keeps Mrs. {Amy} Deffenbacher informed on all matters. Her office management skills are top notch.”

Students and other members of the community see and appreciate their hard work in the office, but some of their most important work is done outside of school.

On the weekends or past three o’clock, Warkentin and Belmont still formulate ways to improve work flow and precision in the office.

School effects students at all times, even after or before school hours. Homework and sports practice penetrate the sanctity of home life and force students to reach out for assistance.

Jarrod Markarian, ’17, expounds upon the assistance that the office staff have provided over the course of his schooling.

“The office staff have helped me countless times,” Markarian said. “They’ve also kept me in check; I have been dress coded before by them but they are just doing their jobs.”

Whether it be for a quick copy of official transcripts or to clear up attendances errors, Belmont and Warkentin take pride in coming through for students.

Belmont first became interested in the secretary position when her oldest child, Noah Belmont, ’14, began to attend FC. An opening came up and she jumped on the opportunity.

Warkentin is a long-time veteran of the office, she became a full time employee of FC in 1984, and has excelled in her many vital roles.

“When third and fourth grade moved to Peoples Campus, I became the elementary secretary,” Warkentin said. “Since that time more responsibilities have been added to my job: purchasing agent, transportation coordinator and my current title is K-12 Administrative Assistant”

The daily responsibilities of the office staff go unnoticed by students and parents. Years of experience in school affairs, has allowed Warkentin to hone her skills of management.

“I attended a business college where I was taught some basic skills,” Warkentin said. “However, most of my management skills have been learned on the job. I am self-motivated and enjoy learning new ideas.”

Nearly all students have been assisted by the dynamic duo, John Dooman, ’15, needed to obtain a copy of his official transcript in order to receive a very hefty discount on a ski resort season pass. But he did not think that the office, or either secretary could help him with the matter because Christmas break had just started.

To Dooman’s great surprise, Belmont, when asked, obtained his transcript both electronically and in paper copy.

“I was very doubtful that Mrs. {Vickey} Belmont would be able to help me with my dilemma,” Dooman said. “But she came through and was very nice about it. I’m thankful that we have such willing and helpful staff members, especially in the office.”

This is just one of the many stories of kindness and helpfulness of the office staff.

Kindness is a great tool, especially when used to help people that need something you can provide, be sure to thank them while passing by, for their service and hard work.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline

For more features, read the Feb. 10 article, Hope Fresno unites pastors in racial equality.

By |2015-02-11T00:00:00+00:00February 11th, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Hope Fresno unites pastors in racial equality (Video)

IMG_8710 copyBre Castro

The Well hosted Hope Fresno, an event to stir racial awareness, on their north campus, Feb. 6 – 7, 2015.

As a reflection of the surge of social awareness and stirrings that the United States and many other nations are facing, a local church decided to take action within its own city. Friday and Saturday, Feb. 6 and 7, The Well Community Church hosted just the event to bring some uncomfortable topics to the table.

Hope Fresno was an event intended to specifically unite White and African American congregations in Fresno County, whilst simultaneously spreading the awareness of racial injustice towards citizens of African descent.

Upon arrival at The Well, it was obvious that the church was packed with a racially diverse group, eager to hear what would unfold. Brad Bell, head pastor of The Well’s North Campus (where the event was held), sat amongst the panel of African American leaders to get to the core of the issue.

A major theme throughout the event was storytelling. Most would agree that a common goal between panelists was for no one to leave without some sort of change of heart. This goal was achieved through real-life, tangible tales of racial injustice.

The panel included Dr. Paul Lawrence Binion II, Senior Pastor of Westside Church of God, Bryson White, Community Organizer with Faith in Community and Sabrina Kelly of Habitat for Humanity. The speakers all took their time telling stories of how they had been affected by phenomenon such as white privilege.

Pastor Bell also spoke from his perspective, as a benefactor of ordeals like white privilege, offering the point of view that many caucasian citizens share.

“From my perspective, of a white middle class dude, I saw things a certain way,” Bell said. “But I began to see that there was another life experience that was very confusing to me. In many ways I felt very accused and angry because I’m not a racist or a guy who would intentionally discriminate against anyone.”

Bell went on to explain his new line of thinking after being introduced to the new concept of white privilege.

“What I was told that I was a recipient of white privilege and there was nothing I could do about that,” Bell continued. “It was very disheartening, and at the same time very encouraging because I sat with my friend and I heard my friend. I began to see things differently.”

However, the truth behind racial inequality prevailed through eye-witness accounts. Several panelists visited Ferguson during the time of the Mike Brown protests, and told the real story behind what occurred versus what the media showed. In short, not even a fraction of the true military presence and brashness was shown on news stations, whereas peaceful protesters were made to look violent.

After the event was over, Sabrina Kelly took some time with staffers to explain how she got involved with the Hope Fresno cause.
“Brad and I are really good friends,” Kelly said. “And I share my stories about my nephews with him all the time, because I struggle with how we never understand the reality of their lives as black men in the city or the concept of being a black man in the United States.”

As she continued, Kelly revealed that her main purpose in speaking to this congregation is rooted in the idea of empathy.

“As I was sharing this, which is something I struggle with all the time, he [/fusion_builder_column]

[Bell] said, ‘you need to tell your story in context of white privilege,'” Kelly said. “If you hear these stories from media, but you don’t experience them, it kind of goes over your head. You can think, ‘maybe that’s not true’, or ‘that’s not my experience.’ But if you hear somebody’s personal story, you can develop empathy; and that’s my goal here. If you develop empathy on this learning journey with us, then maybe things will change.”

The panel discussion was concluded by Deth Im, from People Improving Communities through Organization, with an introduction to the activities taking place on Sat, Feb. 7.

Im led exercises which were to provide an opportunity to experience systemic injustice through an exercise and then provided an open forum to share and learn from each other. Attendees also heard from the representative from Faith in Fresno, who provided statistical information about his city.


The Well Community Church can be reached via Twitter: @wellchurch. Faith in Community can be reached via Twitter: @FIC_Fresno.

These writers can be reach via Twitter: @_chloemueller and @_sarapeterson.

For more features, read the Feb. 5 article, Surviving the flu season, how to recover from illness.

By |2015-02-10T00:00:00+00:00February 10th, 2015|Features, Uncategorized, Videos, Videos 2014-15|3 Comments

Surviving the flu season, how to recover from illness

According to National Public Radio (NPR), the risk of a potentially fatal flu encounter has been increased this year due to the emergence of H3N2, an especially harmful virus.NPR

According to National Public Radio (NPR), the risk of a potentially fatal flu encounter has been increased this year due to the emergence of H3N2, an especially harmful virus.

Tips on preventing and recovering from the seasonal flu

The flu season is fully underway, in perhaps one of the most severe occurrences in recent years. Since early December people from across the nation have fallen ill displaying a plethora of varying symptoms and as the flu season is relatively unpredictable these trends are capable of persisting until the early spring.

According to National Public Radio (NPR), the risk of a potentially fatal flu encounter has been increased this year due to the emergence of H3N2, an especially harmful virus. The main victims of this year’s flu are estimated to be adults age 60 and above and young children with prior health concerns.

“The CDC is worried because the most common strain of flu virus circulating in the United States is one called H3N2,” said NPR. “In previous years, H3N2 strains have tended to send more people to the hospital than other strains ? and cause more deaths, especially among the elderly, children and people with other health problems.”

This raises the question of how to protect oneself and others from the seasonal flu and regain health after initially contacting it.

Flu shot

While there are various recommendations (some very useful) about seasonal prevention, the most frequently advised is the flu shot. As of early December, the government issued an official statement urging US residents over the age of 6 to be immediately vaccinated due to a high probability of contracting the illness. Despite these warnings, many question the vaccine’s effectiveness or simply refuse to be injected out of personal preferences.

According to WebMD, the flu shot’s rates of success depends upon several unique variables including age, fitness, and the strain of virus present in that particular year. However, the vaccine is estimated to have a 70% to 90% rate of affectivity regardless of any outside factors.

There’s two big things happening right now,” Walters said. “First we don’t have enough sunlight and number two people are confined closely indoors so it’s easy to spread. Because we don’t have enough sunlight you can help yourself by taking Vitamin D3 which replaces what the sun does and helps boosts our immune system. — Dr. Karen Walters

As for the procedure, Junior Alli Cowen describes it as quick and painless.

“The shot was really very fast,” Cowen said. “It was in my upper arm and I was honestly shocked at how quick it was. It was pretty painless too. I really never minded shots, but this one seemed easier than most.”

Vaccinations can be found at all medical facilities as well as some select drug stores.

Sanitation

The degree of cleanliness within home, work and school settings plays a large role in the spread of the flu. The virus is naturally prone to flourish in areas where sanitation is taken lightly. SFGate recommends the frequent washing of hands as a major flu deterrent.

“At the minimum, wash your hands in hot water every time you sneeze, cough or touch your nose or mouth, as well as after using the bathroom and before preparing food,” SFGate said. “Take it another step and wash your hands every time you touch another person. Take it to the extreme and wash your hands every time you touch any surface.”

Vitamin D3

The winter season often collaborates in combination with the virus to both increase the spread of the flu and deprive the human body of many essential nutrients necessary for recovery.

Science teacher Dr. Karen Walters points to a lack of sunlight as well as the close proximity of living quarters during the cold months as a major contribution to the flu epidemic.

“There’s two big things happening right now,” Walters said. “First we don’t have enough sunlight and number two people are confined closely indoors so it’s easy to spread. Because we don’t have enough sunlight you can help yourself by taking Vitamin D3 which replaces what the sun does and helps boosts our immune system.”

This simple vitamin is available for both children and adult consumption alike and according to Mercola.com highly effective.

“According to the findings from a 2010 study, vitamin D is a highly effective way to avoid influenza. In fact, children taking low doses of Vitamin D3 were shown to be 42% less likely to come down with the flu.”

How to recover

For those who have managed to contract the flu virus, complete recovery is an essential step in returning to normalcy. Perhaps, one of the most important parts of this process is rest. While prescription medicines and substances such as fever reducers may be necessary, many times rest and nourishment serve as the best remedy, according to Healthline.

“In most cases, the flu just needs to run its course,” Healthline said. “The best advice for people sick with the flu is to get lots of rest and drink plenty of fluids. You may not have much of an appetite, but it’s important to eat regular meals to keep up your strength. Stay home from work or school and don’t go back until your symptoms subside.”

Dean of Students, Amy Deffenbacher says that attending school when ill not only violates FC’s policies, but is likely to lead to more significant health problems for both the individual and those around them.

“If you’re already sick the best thing to do is to stay home until you are well enough to come back,” Deffenbacher said. “Returning too soon will either expose you to new germs, give your cooties to someone else or weaken you so that you’re going to be sick longer. The rules are that you have to be fever free for 24 hours without medicine, have nothing green coming out of your nose and keep away if you have a cough that is likely to disturb others.”

For more features, read the Jan. 4 article, Get to Know: Andrew Guthrie.

Follow The Feather via Twitter and Instagram: @thefeather and @thefeatheronlilne. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @skylerklee.

By |2015-02-05T00:00:00+00:00February 5th, 2015|Announcements, Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Get to Know: Andrew Guthrie

Andrew1Jason Swain | The Feather Online Archive

Senior Andrew Guthrie gave his testimony during chapel, Jan. 22.

Senior Andrew Guthrie gave his testimony during chapel, Jan. 22. Guthrie shared about the trials he has endured throughout his life. He specifically spoke about his junior year when his mother and three of his grandparents passed away. Guthrie encouraged the crowd to lean on God’s strength during difficult times.

Quebe: Was this your first time sharing your testimony? If so, why have you not shared it before? What was going through your mind?

Guthrie: Yes, I have never actually given a testimony like that before, mainly because I never thought anyone would care to hear it or be affected by it. But while speaking, I realized that it was making an impact by the responses I got from others in the school, so that helped me keep talking.

Quebe: What was the one thing you wanted people to remember about your testimony?

Guthrie: I wanted people to realize that although I’m not necessarily done with my struggles, I have seen how amazing God’s help had been over these past several years, even if they were small things at the time. The little helpful actions can drastically help later.

Quebe: Why do you feel that is something important to remember?

Guthrie: Sometimes we want a huge change, or are overlooking the small steps God has for us to reach a much better place. Overlooking these small steps will leave you stuck behind.

Quebe: What is your encouragement to someone going through similar struggles?

Guthrie: That there is some good in all the bad you may be facing. God has strengthened me through the struggles I have faced, and even though I have had a difficult 2014, I am stronger and better built in Christ.

Quebe: Do you think going to FCS helped you at all to get through life’s struggles? If so, how? Who is one person you feel had a major impact on your life? How?

Guthrie: Yes, I think FCS has helped me through my struggles and has strengthened me immensely by providing a place where there are people who want to connect and be together.

Sometimes we want a huge change, or are overlooking the small steps God has for us to reach a much better place. Overlooking these small steps will leave you stuck behind. –Senior Andrew Guthrie

Quebe: Who is one person you feel had a major impact on your life? How?

Guthrie: Someone who has greatly reached out to me and been like a brother is Jordan Castro, who always gave me a different view on my issues so that I can see them as God strengthening me, not hurting.

Quebe: Do you think you will ever share your testimony again? Why or why not?

Guthrie: Yes, I would share it over and over if it helped even one person. I don’t expect my story to be any more powerful than others, but it is sincere, and I think people need to hear true stories from those they can relate to.

Please feel free to comment about what you took away from Guthrie’s testimony.

Follow The Feather via Twitter and Instagram: @thefeather and @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_olivialoren_.

For more features, read the Feb. 3 article, Where are they now? Todd Bennett.

By |2015-02-04T00:00:00+00:00February 4th, 2015|FC Arts, Features, Uncategorized|1 Comment

Featured App: Shades

Screenshot-136 (1)Apple app store

Although this game can be frustrating, the gameplay is simple and boasts beauty. It is colorful, appealing to the eye and has a nice minimalist design.

Shades is a game similar to Tetris, but with a twist. This Indie game seems simple enough, but is surprisingly difficult. The game features matching shades of colors, as the name suggests. If you get a whole row of one single color, you cancel out that row. The goal of the game is to last as long as you can without filling the screen with blocks.

UOVO, the creators of this app give a perfect description of the game and its complexities.

“Shades is a mesmerizing, calming, Zen-like puzzler that will eventually have you frantically swiping your phone like a stress monkey,” UOVO says. “Meditation and Panic. It’s a fantastic combo!”

Having played the game, and I know how frustrating it is to mess up when you have gotten far! The main strategy required to do well in the game is to stack the blocks from darkest shade to lightest, and making plans to match rows while doing that. It’s also good to watch which block is coming next by looking at the color strip on the upper-most part of the screen.

Although this game can be frustrating, the gameplay is simple and boasts beauty. It is colorful, appealing to the eye and has a nice minimalist design. The sound effects are very soothing as well. They are composed of almost violin-sounding clips.

Even the graphics are soothing to the eye! The game has three different modes: Easy, Medium and Hard. The developers warn that it is “Surprisingly difficult”. Another bonus of gameplay is that you can change the colors you want to play with. I would strongly suggest this game.

Shades is a mesmerizing, calming, Zen-like puzzler that will eventually have you frantically swiping your phone like a stress monkey. Meditation and Panic. It’s a fantastic combo! — UOVO promotional material

One app review by “@Angelfreak91,” states the following.

“UOVO has done it!” Angelfreak91 said. “A unique Tetris-like style with their own twist. With a Zen like technique to the gameplay you’ll find yourself replaying Shades over and over again trying to beat that previous score. Recommended for all ages. I’d give it five out of five stars. The app adds an insane difficulty for those who are looking for a real challenge with hard mode. I would suggest the developers add achievements. Overall amazing app!”

This app was even made App of the Week by Apple themselves. It was also featured in Apple’s “Best New Games” section. As of Jan. 29, it is 20th on the App Store top charts. If you are looking for a simple relaxing game, this game is for you. Best of all, it’s free.

Follow The Feather via Twitter and Instagram: @thefeather and @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @jareds_the_name_.

For more featured apps, check out Featured app: Elevate.

For more features, read the Jan. 26 article, Local eatery hosts school fundraiser (VIDEO).

By |2015-02-03T00:00:00+00:00February 3rd, 2015|Features, Technology, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Where are they now? Todd Bennett

Prior to his move, Bennett worked at FC as principal for a number of five years after about 21 years of experience in education. Jeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

Prior to his move, Bennett worked at FC as principal for a number of five years after about 21 years of experience in education.

Former principal reflects on recent weeks

As most know, many changes have arrived along with this 2014-15 school year. This includes the relocation of FC former principal, Todd Bennett. Prior to his move, Bennett worked at FC as principal for a number of five years after about 21 years of experience in education. Currently, he is the principal at Laurel Creek Elementary School in the Fairfield-Suisun Unified School District. Laurel Creek is a large K-6 school with 940 enrolled students.

Garcia: How is Laurel Creek different from Fresno Christian?

Bennett: Laurel Creek is much larger than FCS, and it only serves kindergarten through sixth grade. It is similar to other public schools where I have worked. The school is ethnically and culturally diverse. Our largest ethnic groups are Hispanic, African American, and White. Our students represent all religions, as do our teachers.

Garcia: Do you miss FC?

Bennett: Yes! There are many things that I miss about Fresno Christian. I miss the students, faculty and staff. My family and I were so blessed to have spent five years in such a positive, faith-filled environment. The opportunity to focus on God’s Word every day at work, and to openly share my faith with students and colleagues was amazing. I am grateful that my children were able to graduate from such an outstanding school.

Garcia: How has God blessed you throughout the past year?

Bennett: The Lord has blessed my family and me in so many ways. I love my job, my wife is working at a small Christian school here in Fairfield, and my kids are both attending college up here. God has given me the opportunity to lead another great school, and be part of the lives of a new group of children. We are living in a great part of California. Fairfield is about mid-way between San Francisco and Sacramento. It takes about about an hour to get to either city.

Garcia: Is there anything that has changed?

Bennett: Moving to a new city, after a lifetime in Fresno, has been a pretty big change. My parents, sister, and closest friends are still in Fresno, so I don’t get to see them as often as I would like. Other than that, the changes have all been positive. It is exciting to take on new challenges and experiences.

Garcia: Do you have any further career goals?

Bennett: I love being a school site principal. I hope that I can have a positive influence on the students and with whom I work, and that I can serve my Lord and Savior wherever He calls me.

A previous article about Bennett, upon his arrival at Fresno Christian in 2009 can be read here.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather and Instagram @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via twitter: @ashhasthescoop.

For more features, read the Feb. 2 article, Alumnus takes talents to professional level.

By |2015-02-03T00:00:00+00:00February 3rd, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Alumnus takes talents to professional level

unnamedCourtesy Brian Casey

Since graduating from FC in 2003, alumnus Brian Casey has gone on to play professional football in Europe, most recently with the Allgaeu Comets.

Brian Casey, ’03, continues to play professional football in Europe

Professional athletes are born out of Fresno and Clovis area high schools every year. However, in the long history of FC, only two alumni have gone on to the professional level.

Brian Casey, ’03, who played varsity campus football, took his talents all the way to the professional level: Indoor Football League and European Football League.

“Fresno Christian doesn’t have a huge sports program like a lot of these schools in the vicinity,” Casey said. “The school does well, but compared to these other Division I schools like Clovis North, you don’t get a whole lot of notoriety. I never expected that I would be able to go as far as I have.”

Considering he graduated 12 years ago, many probably did not get the honor of watching Casey play in his high school years. However, Bible teacher and former football coach, Robert Foshee, recalls coaching for Casey on those cold Friday nights.

“Casey was a real athletic kid,” Foshee said. “He played wide reciever and corner for JV, but was brought up to varsity his sophomore year to play corner. He was a strong leader on the team and always made big plays on defense. I’m pretty sure he received All-League three years in a row.”

After graduating high school, Casey, who played at the linebacker position, went on to play his collegiate career with Azusa Pacific University. While attending college there, he obtained his bachelor’s degree in Physical Education and graduated in 2009. He went on and later graduated with his Masters, in Science in Physical Education and Sport Science, in 2012.

“I had wanted to play ball in college, but did not think that I would have the opportunity because I went to such a small high school,” Casey said. “I decided to send out my highlight videos just to see what would happen and Azusa Pacific responded. I did pretty good throughout college, but it was my performance at the Senior All-Star Classic, my senior year, that got my agent’s attention. He contacted me and showed me my options and that is how I got started in Arena Football. After having recieved my Masters degree in college, though, it really made me wish I had put more effort into acedemics in high school.”

His first season at the professional level was with the arena football team based in Odessa, Texas, the West Texas Roughnecks. He played with this team for two seasons until he made the switch over to European football in the 2011-2012 season.

“After I got done with arena, I could have still played with them if I wanted,” Casey said. “I also had some tryouts with Canada and the NFL, but Europe really stuck out to me. I went there and played for the Allgaeu Comets and I have loved it ever since.”

God has played a major role in my life. I wouldn’t be where I am if it weren’t for him. He has been my driver and directed me on the right path. As I said, I never would have thought that I would have taken football to the professional level and, if it weren’t for him guiding me, I never would have made it. I realized at an early age that I just needed to trust in him and let him take control, and he has taken pretty good care of me up until this point. — Brian Casey, ’03

Having gone to a Christian high school and Christian university, Casey has a real love for God, who, he believes, has blessed him with the talents that he possesses. Casey expounded upon how God has influenced his career and life choices.

“God has played a major role in my life,” Casey said. “I wouldn’t be where I am if it weren’t for him. He has been my driver and directed me on the right path. As I said, I never would have thought that I would have taken football to the professional level and, if it weren’t for him guiding me, I never would have made it. I realized at an early age that I just needed to trust in him and let him take control, and he has taken pretty good care of me up until this point.”

After having played football since middle school, Casey has had a great number of highlight moments. He shared what he thinks is his all-time greatest moment on the field.

“In college, we played West Texas which is a huge school,” Casey said. “In that game I had an interception that I returned to the house. It was amazing going from playing high school football for Fresno Christian over at Clark Intermediate School, to getting booed by 50,000 Texas fans for returning a pick-six.”

While football is Casey’s true passion, he does not necessarily plan on playing the game for the rest of his life. In the off seasons he returns to California to coach the game that he loves.

In the past, Casey has coached football at both California Lutheran University in southern California and Clovis North High School. Casey explains how he would like to make coaching into a full time career when he is done playing.

“I actually figured out that I wanted to be a football coach when I was here at Fresno Christian,” Casey said. “I coached the girls’ powderpuff team. I got such a joy out of watching people, especially women, pickup a football and learn how to play through us teaching them. That’s when I really realized that enjoyed coaching and seeing how people learned to do things from me and my skills. I majored in physical education so that when I am done playing, I can become a coach somewhere.”

Throughout his career, Casey has racked up quite a few honors. Just a few of these honors include; two-time Euro Football League Champion in Serbia and Germany, EAC All-Star LB for Team Europe, German Football League South Defensive Player of the Year and many more.

Casey will return to Europe again next season to continue his professional career. His is currently a free agent but this alumnus takes talents to professional level overseas.

Gary “Papa” Schultz, former campus principal, felt it was important to interview Casey and tell his story. Schultz believes that students who read about Casey’s accomplishments can take home valuable lessons about achieving their goals.

“He (Casey) is one these alumni who really has a success story in that he struggled some in high school with academics,” Schultz said. “He had to work very hard and it was really fairly difficult for him. He was so determined, though, that he went on to college and got his B.A. and then his Masters Degree. He has really done some remarkable things with his life considering how hard it was for him. He was a pretty good ball player in high school, but in college he was really good and he is now exceeding in the pros, making all-star teams and whatnot. I thought that was the story we would want to tell for those people who think they can’t, but really can if they are determined and work hard for it.”

Those who wish to contact Casey regarding his football career and/or just to catch up, you can reach him via Twitter and Instagram: @Irishman_22 and @Irishman22. He can also be reached by his email: [email protected]

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @namoodnhoj.

For more features, read the Jan. 29 article, Student Leadership: Begins hosting special days.

By |2015-02-02T00:00:00+00:00February 2nd, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

One of FCS’ founding kindergarten teachers passes away

Mrs. Cookingham was one of the founding teachers at FC upon it's opening in 1977 and became the first K-2 teacher at Hume Lake Charter School at the age of 72.Cookingham Family

Mrs. Cookingham was one of the founding teachers at FC upon it’s opening in 1977 and became the first K-2 teacher at Hume Lake Charter School at the age of 72.

FC honors the life and memory of Melva Cookingham

On Jan. 13, 2015 at the age of 88, Mrs. Melva Cookingham, mother of four, wife, friend and FC kindergarten teacher for over 20 years, departed from this earth and was united with her Heavenly Father.

Mrs. Cookingham was born June 8, 1926, in Columbia Falls, Montana to Mr. and Mrs. Helen and Siebert Williamson. When she was six months old her family moved to Monmouth, Oregon.

Mrs. Cookingham graduated from Monmouth High School in 1943 and pursued higher education at Willamette University.

After graduating from Willamette in 1947, Mrs. Cookingham attended Columbia University, earning a master’s degree in music at age 24. She married Paul Cookingham after meeting him at Columbia on June 27, 1948 and together they moved to the Fresno area in 1953.

Mrs. Cookingham was one of the founding kindergarten teachers at FC upon it’s opening in 1977 and became the first K-2 teacher at Hume Lake Charter School at the age of 72. In 1985 she was declared Fresno County’s Mother of the Year by the Women’s Chamber of Commerce. Mrs. Cookingham also played an integral role in her local church,The Bridge, and became involved with several short term missionary endeavors throughout the years.

Previous first grade teacher, Gladys Kerfoot taught alongside Mrs. Cookingham and remained a close friend for 37 years. In addition to Mrs. Cookingham’s gentle sprit, and bold faith Kerfoot recalls a class tradition deemed ‘the beauty spot’.

“When you would watch her with her children she could always correct somebody over there but never do it in a harsh way,” Kerfoot said. “I remember she always had a place in her class called the beauty spot. It was a table that had a Bible on it and maybe some pretty flowers or a picture. Her relationship to God and her faith really stood out in her life. She lived what she believed.”

Mrs. Cookingham is survived by her three sons, Kent and wife Menta, Kevin and wife Kelli and Curtis and wife Pamela as well as eleven grandchildren and six great grandchildren. In December of 1970 Mr. Cookingham passed away followed by her son Mr. Craig Cookingham in August of 2010.

According to Kerfoot, any misfortunes in the life of Mrs. Cookingham paled in comparison to her positive attitude and compassion for others.

When you would watch her with her children she could always correct somebody over there but never do it in a harsh way. I remember she always had a place in her class called the beauty spot. It was a table that had a Bible on it and maybe some pretty flowers or a picture. Her relationship to God and her faith really stood out in her life. She lived what she believed. — Gladys Kerfoot about her friend Melva Cookingham

“Mrs. Cookingham was one of the most godly people I know,” Kefoot said. “I could talk to her about anything. She would pray about it. We would pray together. She had a lot of tragedy in her life yet she always had faith that God was going to take her through it all.”

Jim Wiens grew up a close friend with Mrs. Cookingham’s sons. Although he did not attend FC, he kept in close contact with the family for over 50 years and eventually sent his own children to be taught by Mrs. Cookingham.

Wiens describes Mrs. Cookingham as a kindhearted and reliable friend.

“She was kind and gracious,” Wiens said. “She impacted me as an example of a true believer. She ran the race well and finished strong. She was a solid testimony. … She was kind to people and very concerned with and kind to children. Mrs. Cookingham was faithful in friendship. She would be considered consistent and valued as a consoler. She was always kind.”

Jim Wiens children John Wiens, Mary Schramm and Sara Contreras have all graduated from FC and created families of their own. They still recall however, spending long hours at Mrs. Cookingham’s home at a young age and calling her by the affectionate title ‘Grandma Cookingham.’

“She had a really fun two-story house that she would let us play at when we were growing up and she always let us be creative and do adventurous things,” Mary said. “I remember she had a really amazing garden. She just let us play and be kids.”

Wiens says that Mrs. Cookingham always had a habit of keeping her guest’s plates full especially after a long day of play.

“I remember going to her house quite a bit when we were young,” Wiens said. “We loved playing up in her attic, sliding down the stairs and going swimming. She always put extra food on your plate and made you eat it even if you weren’t hungry. It was one of the funny things she did. She always wanted to make sure you had enough food.”

In addition to her teaching profession and church involvement, Mrs. Cookingham had a passion for gardening and for music. She taught piano for several years and often brought her musical expertise to the classroom.

“She was always playing the piano and always singing whether it was at her house or at school,” Wiens said. “I remember in kindergarten she would always give little performances and she would play the piano and sing for that. I definitely remember her love for music.”

For the Wiens family Mrs. Cookingham’s influence reached far beyond childhood. Schramm says that the kindergarten teacher and surrogate grandmother continued to take interest in her family and personal life up until her passing.

“She was passionate about relationships;” Schramm said “She was always very interested in what was going on with us and what was happening in our lives. Once I got married and had a family she was interested in knowing what was happening with each of my kids and with my husband.”

Although Superintendent Jeremy Brown did not know Mrs. Cookingham personally he expresses gratitude at her twenty years of service and of her unwavering pursuit of God’s will.

“Melva loved children and she loved teaching,” Brown said. “She always had time to counsel and encourage parents and staff. Her words of wisdom are remembered to this day. She was a woman of God trusting Jesus to lead and care for her needs and her life. She played a critical role in setting the standards and laying the ground work for future kindergarten teachers.”

A service celebrating the life of Mrs. Melva Cookingham is to be held at the The Bridge Fresno, 3438 East Ashlan Ave., Fresno, CA 93726, on Saturday, January 31, 2015, at 1 p.m. The family prefers that all remembrances be sent to Hume Lake Christian Camps, 5545 East Hedges, Fresno, CA 93727 instead of floral arrangements.

For more features, read the Jan. 28 article, Air quality affects campus, valley.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @skylerklee.

By |2015-01-30T00:00:00+00:00January 30th, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Featured app: Elevate

Elevate is a game-based brain training app that crowned Apple’s “Best iPhone App of 2014” award. It is designed to improve the customer’s focus, memory, information processing ability and more.

The developers of Elevate collaborated with experts in neuroscience and cognitive science to ensure the effectiveness and reliability of this program.

When trying out the app for the first time, users can customize the program by selecting the specific skills they want to improve, including “to articulate your thoughts more clearly,” “process information faster,” “retain more of what you read and hear,” and so on. Then, Elevate will post a quiz to evaluate users? current brain power level in 5 aspects: Reading, Writing, Speaking, Listening and Math.

During the training, these five aspects will be further categorized into 28 specific skills such as speaking precision, listening focus and writing error avoidance. Each of the skills is related to a fun game through which the app challenges users’ brains.

Steven Tweedie from Business Insider praised the subtle design of the games in Elevate.

“Each game features a polished design and plenty of attention to detail, but most importantly,” Tweedie said, “Elevate strikes a good balance between challenging and fun; a vital requirement to get you to return for more training the next day.”

Users will be given three different training sessions each day to build the skills they need and the orders of the sessions are personalized to optimize each users? training result. Elevate also automatically adjusts the difficulty of the games according to players? previous performances. After completing each session, a certain number of points will be added to the user’s overall score in the related aspect.

You can also play games that you have unlocked as many times as you want, but in order to unlock every game at once, you will have to pay and update this app to “Elevate Pro”.

Just like the fitness training apps available on mobile devices, this brain training application pushes users’ limits by providing training sessions that are more challenging than the users’ current ability. Thus, the first few sessions might be frustrating, but if you complete the training at least 4 times a week, as the app developers suggested, exhilarating results will arise.

Click here to read more about the app.

Follow The Feather via Twitter and Instagram: @thefeather and @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @mojunpan.

For more features, read the Jan. 23 article, Student of the Month: Poojan Gopal strives toward profession in mechanical engineering .

By |2015-01-29T00:00:00+00:00January 29th, 2015|Features, Technology, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Beatriz Foth reflects on 13 years of service

Retired Spanish teacher shares her favorite memories

danceJarrod Markarian

Beatriz Foth and Greg Stobbe celebrate Cinco de Mayo, May 2014.

Half way through first semester, FC’s Spanish teacher of almost 13 years, Beatriz Foth, retired. She taught elementary and high school students everything from beginner’s Spanish to Spanish III. Foth did not only teach a new language, she taught her students about a different culture as well. We were recently able to have a Q&A with her where she reflected on her many years as a teacher.

Quebe: What was your favorite part of your job?

Foth: The interaction with the students, being able to pray and talk and share about God so openly. The smiles and expressions of joy on the students’ face when grasping and mastering grammatical concepts and vocabulary or as they just entered my classroom. Many of them were able to express themselves in Spanish not because they had to but because they wanted to.

The satisfaction that I had as a teacher as I realized that many of my students wanted to learn to speak Spanish and actually used every chance they had to apply it in real life situations, both inside and outside the classroom.

Along the years many of them continued their studies of the Spanish language and culture in university, even spending a semester or a whole year in a Spanish-speaking country. I was able to enjoy their visits afterwards and saw how much they have learned. Many of them came back totally bilingual. It is an indescribable feeling of satisfaction, reward and joy that I have been blessed to experience along those 13 years at FCS.

Quebe: What was the hardest part?

Foth: To teach to those students whose attitude towards learning a second language was very negative. Or the ones whose stereotypes and misconceptions about Spanish speakers and their varied cultures became a barrier for their learning.

Quebe: What were some of the funniest moments in your class?

Foth: They were so many! Students’ presentations, videos, comments, skits, etc. There was never a dull moment in my classroom with the students. There are so many that I cannot come up with just one!

Quebe: What will you miss the most?

Foth: Definitely, the students. I was blessed with so many years of getting to know so many wonderful teenagers and elementary children. Many of them probably will never realize how much they had blessed my life with their comments, smiles, hugs and all the love they poured on me. I will miss the many lunch times with so many students talking about life, God, their future goals, songs, movies and so many other topics. I will also miss sharing my knowledge and passion for the language and culture as well as their interest in learning and sharing about their learning experiences.

The satisfaction that I had as a teacher as I realized that many of my students wanted to learn to speak Spanish and actually used every chance they had to apply it in real life situations, both inside and outside the classroom. –Beatriz Foth

Quebe: Do you remember your first day at FC? If so, what was it like?

Foth: I was very overwhelmed with so many new things. I was excited but confused at the same time. To experience culture shock for the third time in my life was really hard. The expectations that I had about teaching in the U.S. was very different compared to what the reality was. I did not understand the learning culture of my new students. It took me a while to figure it out. It was really hard and very frustrating at times.

Quebe: What was your favorite class to teach? Spanish I, II, or III?

Foth: Every class has its favorite parts. Spanish I was the easiest to teach regarding vocabulary and grammar. There were so many new things they had to learn about culture and language. Spanish II was the hardest regarding grammar but it was always so nice to spend another year with the students.

Spanish III has always been my favorite for several reasons: the students and I had already developed a very friendly and deeper relationship; they were in my classroom for the third year because they wanted to learn more and we always enjoyed each other very much; they had a very solid foundation in both grammar and vocabulary and now they had to take it to the next level. I always looked forward to my Spanish III class. It was always so much fun! I will miss them so much.

After 13 years of teaching Spanish, Foth created many memories with her students. We encourage you to leave comments about moments that you enjoyed with her.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather and Instagram @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_olivialoren_.

For more features, read the Jan. 28 article, Air quality affects campus, valley.

By |2015-01-29T00:00:00+00:00January 29th, 2015|Announcements, Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Air quality affects campus, valley

FCS file photoFC file photo

Superintendent Jeremy Brown believes the air quality is a much bigger problem than some realize.

Health issues arise among student body as air conditions worsen

Many health issues in the Central Valley revolve around the air quality. It creates random flu seasons, allergy shots in the middle of May and a third of FC students missing from classes. Recently, Superintendent Jeremy Brown released a plan for hazardous air quality days which states the danger in certain air levels and what FC is going to do to make the environment safer for the students.

FC Athletics have already taken the task under way, using a subscription that provides the correct air status and the readings from partnering school districts. The elementary, junior high and high school departments are notified, and if the day affects sports games or practices, parents will be notified through email.

Brown believes the air quality is a much bigger problem than some realize. His job is one that must oversee all aspects of a successful working environment and declining such knowledge on the issue would be a failure on his part.

“It is a point of emphasis this year,” Brown said. “It does have impact on our students and if you have ever experienced someone struggling with breathing properly it makes you very aware of the issue. If FC isn’t a safe place emotionally, spiritually and physically then I have failed in my number one job.”

Air quality is measured in color levels. The orange level is unhealthy for sensitive groups, the red level is unhealthy for everyone and purple and maroon air quality levels are hazardous for everyone. The quality can change throughout the day. On red level hours, physical education classes will be moved to the FC gym opposed to outside. Children with asthma may stay indoors with a parent’s request and are advised to make their medicine available at school.

Amber Wilson, ’17, struggles with moderate asthma especially on red or purple levels. She believes that it is a big problem, specifically for the athletes.

“Even though we live in Fresno its usually fine for me because I don’t have severe asthma, as long as I’m not running around,” Wilson said. “I play sports and it’s really hard because we do have bad air quality and it is a problem. When its red or purple it affects me. If I just walk around I get tired and it’s hard to breath.”

Even though we live in Fresno its usually fine for me because I don’t have severe asthma, as long as I’m not running around. I play sports and it’s really hard because we do have bad air quality and it is a problem. When its red or purple it affects me. If I just walk around I get tired and it’s hard to breath. –Amber Wilson

Freshman Joshua Villa, does not care about the air quality. He does not have any history with asthma and the quality of air does not matter to him.

“I have not had any problems with asthma before,” Villa said. “So the levels of air doesn’t help me. Its not something important to me.”

For more information on healthy air living visit this website: Why Healthy Air Living?.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @nhudecek16 or through email at [email protected].

For more features, the Jan. 23 article, Student of the Month: Poojan Gopal strives toward profession in mechanical engineering.

By |2015-01-28T00:00:00+00:00January 28th, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Local eatery hosts school fundraiser (VIDEO)

Applebee’s provides opportunity for school

IMG_5241Photo by Emily Ladd

Applebee’s school sports wall, with Fresno Christian teams from over the years.

Students, teachers, families and community supporters alike dined at the Applebee’s on the corner of Cedar and Herndon, Jan. 15, 2015, to support FC. Applebee’s donated 15% of their revenue that evening when diners showed their waiter the fundraiser flier.

Dean of Students Amy Deffenbacher explained how the event benefited both the school and the restaurant.

“I love fundraising events, like the Applebee’s one for several different reasons. It takes something that all of us do (eat dinner) and turns it into an opportunity to give back to the school,” Deffenbacher said. “Second, it gets our school out into the community and helps form partnerships with our neighboring businesses. In this case, got a former FC student Jessica Radtke (’02), a current Applebee’s employee who helped coordinate the event, a reason to reconnect with Fresno Christian.”

The restaurant boasted decorations such as balloons in school colors and a raffle table in the back with stuffed eagles and decorations. The raffle offered a chance to win spirit wear for those who entered the drawing. Fierce the Eagle, cherished FC mascot, even made an appearance to greet families.

Jenny King, ’17, did not attend the fundraiser, but expressed her admiration for the event.

“It’s pretty cool; the location was prime because it’s a nearby restaurant. You don’t see too many restaurants supporting schools, especially bigger chains like Applebee’s,” King said. “I was kind of surprised that they were a big part of supporting us the first time I went there.”

The support from the Applebee’s location goes beyond just this year; they have actively supported the school in past years and hang FC memorabilia photos along the walls.

The Feather would like to formally thank Applebee’s for the opportunity to raise money for the school.

Check back later for how much money the fundraiser raised.

FCS Applebee’s Fundraiser 2015 from The Feather Online on Vimeo.

Follow The Feather via Twitter and Instagram: @thefeather and @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @ejLadd

For more features, read Jan. 22 article, Publications enrich audience through social media.

By |2015-01-26T00:00:00+00:00January 26th, 2015|FC Events, Features, Uncategorized, Videos, Videos 2014-15|0 Comments

Student of the Month: Poojan Gopal strives toward profession in mechanical engineering

IMG_6610rKylie Bell

The student of the month for January is sophomore Poojan Gopal, chosen by history and photojournalism teacher, Kori Friesen.

Sophomore acknowledges the value of hard work

Every month The Feather will highlight one student recommended by a teacher and voted upon by Feather staff members. Students are chosen depending upon several factors including and not limited to good grades, class engagement, positive attitude and special extracurricular activities.

The student of the month for January is sophomore Poojan Gopal, chosen by history and photojournalism teacher, Kori Friesen. Friesen says that Gopal actively displays a determination to work hard and improve in his studies.

“I picked him because I have seen an exceptional amount of dedication and commitment in APUSH (AP U.S History),” Friesen said.”Poojan doesn’t complain, he has a great attitude and he is committed to doing the ‘hard’ stuff to get it right. I appreciate what he brings to the table each time. I’m very proud of him.”

Gopal joined the FC student body three years ago after attending Clovis Christian Schools. He transferred with the intention to grow in both academic excellence and personal faith.

This year, Gopal has taken on a full academic load as well as his first AP class. In addition, Gopal plans to apply to the California Scholarship Association (CSF) this semester. Although, he does not focus solely upon school work, Gopal understands the potential impact of academics on the future.

“If you want to be successful in life you have to know stuff education wise,” Gopal said. “Getting an education helps you out a lot in life. It gets you a job so you have enough to support yourself and your family.”

Mother, Manisha Gopal, says that her son has shown a great deal of dedication to his classes this semester.

“He works hard a lot,” Manisha said. “Usually he does good at whatever he does. He always does his homework at home and has improved a lot since the beginning of the year with a 4.0 (GPA). My hope for him is that he will continue doing what he is doing with advancement.”

I picked him because I have seen an exceptional amount of dedication and commitment in APUSH. Poojan doesn’t complain, he has a great attitude and he is committed to doing the ‘hard’ stuff to get it right. I appreciate what he brings to the table each time. I’m very proud of him.–Kori Friesen.


During his free time, Poojan enjoys socializing with friends, playing video games and following professional basketball, football and baseball. His favorite teams are the Los Angeles Lakers and the Cleveland Browns. Gopal says that time to relax and rejuvenate plays an important role in being a well-rounded student.

“You can?t always be focused on school,” Gopal said. “You have to take a break every once and awhile to relieve stress and unwind. Watching sports and taking that time definitely does that for me.”

Nevan Gonzalez, ’17, has been friends with Gopal since his arrival in junior high three years ago. Gonzales says that Gopal is a loyal companion and overall fun person to be around.
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“He?s the type of friend that you can just hang around with,” Gonzales said. “In a group he would probably be most likely to talk but not extremely often. In general, he?s just the type of person you can be around all the time.”

After high school Gopal plans to attend classes at Fresno State before transferring to the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and eventually to the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) in order to pursue a profession in mechanical engineering. Gopal says that engineering is a stable profession that aligns with his own personal work ethic.

“I decided last year to become a mechanical engineer,” Gopal said. “I decided to do this just because it?s something that I think is a good job. I?d be a good mechanical engineer because I would always get the work done. I would try my best and give 100% effort.”

A video on Poojan Gopal is to be added at a later date.

For more features, read the Jan. 22 article, National holiday reminds citizens of civil responsibility.

Follow The Feather via Twitter and Instagram: @thefeather and @thefeatheronlilne. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @skylerklee.

By |2015-01-23T00:00:00+00:00January 23rd, 2015|Academics, Features, Leadership, Uncategorized|0 Comments