COLUMN: Holding our own at CSPA Convention

image1

The Feather staff earned a Gold Crown at the CSPA convention in March.

As a student journalist, there are few honors that are as grand and prestigious as the Gold Crown presented by the Columbia Scholastic Press Association (CSPA) at their annual convention. This award focuses on the excellence of the publication’s design, photography, concept, coverage and writing. In short, the Gold Crown is an award for the highest excellence in the very fundamentals of journalism.

Attending Columbia University with 2,691 other delegates and 299 different schools put The Feather in perspective, March 20. We competed on a national stage with a swarm of other media devotees to the practice of journalism, and we were one of the only two digital publications from California to win a Gold Crown in the online category.

In comparison to the size of the other publications, The Feather is incredibly small. And yet we were able to hold our own and bring home a Gold Crown, one of the highest national awards for scholastic journalism.

The CSPA hosted the student journalists incredibly well. They brought all of us into Columbia University’s campus; they let us walk the university halls and classrooms and listen to a variety of different speakers talk about a variety of different topics. The CSPA also asked some of The Feather editors and adviser Greg Stobbe to teach classes: Chloe Mueller, Sara Peterson, Ryan King, and Callista Fries all hosted sessions on behalf of The Feather and the CSPA.

Though I did not listen to every speaker, the speakers I did listen too had a lot to say about journalism and high school publications. I learned a about new media formats and how to come up with new ideas for articles, but for the most part, the content felt like it was second nature. I already knew much of the material and practice it on the Feather on a daily basis, so the speakers only really helped affirm what I already knew plus added a few gems to take back home. Should I return to New York with The Feather next year, it would be informative to listen to more speakers on different podcasting ideas and ways to improve media use.

Attending the CSPA convention is also a great way to share ideas with other staffs from around the country, whether we share/swap papers, struggles and how we overcome them. The Feather has benefited greatly over the years through this real time engagement with our peers. Plus it is good to be a part of a larger group who all have the same goals and pride of high school journalism.

Being on a staff as small as The Feather and still being able to win a Gold Crown fills my heart to the brim with pride. I fully intend the join The Feather again next year and show Columbia that we are still worthy of the Gold.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @RRoggenstein.

For more opinions, read the March 24 article, College Corner: Fresno State standards changing.

By |2015-03-26T00:00:00+00:00March 26th, 2015|Column, FC Arts, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

BREAKING: Feather earns CSPA Gold Crown

TimesSquareGoldCrown

Feather editors celebrate in Times Square after earning a CSPA Digital Gold Crown, March 20.

As the conclusion of the Feather editorial staff’s trip to New York City, staffers attend the Columbia Scholastic Press Association (CSPA) crowning award ceremony at Columbia University, March 20. This event, which takes place on mid-afternoon Friday, reveals whether students have received a Silver or Gold Crown for their efforts.

After anxiously waiting for their paper to be called, staffers finally got the news that they earned a CSPA Gold Crown, the highest award given by the CSPA. This is the third consecutive and fifth time overall that The Feather has taken home this award along with two Silvers since 2008.

The Feather is honored to be recognized by such a nationally acclaimed source. Staffers hope to continue the tradition of taking home a Gold Crown. Next semester, The Feather will be moving in a new, more modern direction with a new website layout. The Feather will also work to implement more texture and media through new outlets.

2,691 students attended the convention, representing 299 schools within 34 states. Some schools even represented neighboring nations, such as Mexico and Canada.

Editor-in-Chief, Chloe Mueller, ’16, reports an attitude of elation towards this win, and motivation for the future.

“Of course, before you actually get the award, you are worried that you may not receive it,” Mueller said. “So when I heard that we won a Gold Crown, I was ecstatic. This experience has really motivated me to push on and come back stronger next year.”

Senior John Dooman, Reviews Editor, shares the highlight of the New York trip along and winning the Gold Crown award.

“This is the third Gold Crown that The Feather has won since I first joined,” Dooman said. “The anticipation that was built up around winning this last crown was crazy. Most of us editors are seniors and this was our last chance to help The Feather achieve excellence and I think I speak for all the senior editors when I say that this was a great way to end our high school journalism careers.”

Videographer Timothy Nyberg, ’16, explains his reaction to winning the CSPA Digital Gold Crown and looks forward to working for the gold next year.

“I was thrilled when I found out that we had won the CSPA Gold Crown. Each staff member has put in so much work this year and we are happy to receive a pay off,” Nyberg said. “I’m looking forward to going above and beyond next year.”

While The Feather Online did not qualify for a National Scholastic Press Association Online Pacemaker for the second year in a row, the staff is excited to rebuild the website and be more forward thinking to include a more modern look and feel with an emphasis on media. Look for the changes by summer’s end.

Along with The Feather, the Foothill Dragon Press from Ventura, CA, was also awarded a Digital Gold Crown.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather and Instagram @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_sarapeterson.

For more features, read the March 18 article, Alumna shares personal journey, life with professional athlete.

By |2015-03-23T00:00:00+00:00March 23rd, 2015|FC Arts, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

5th CSPA Gold crown

IMG_7852

Feather editors traveled to New York City in March and won a CSPA Digital Gold Crown at Columbia University.

The Feather was awarded a Digital Gold Crown at the 91st annual Columbia Scholastic Press Association (CSPA) journalism convention at Columbia University in NYC!

This is The Feather Online’s 3rd Gold Crown in a row and 5th CSPA Gold Crown since 2008. The Feather also has earned two Silver Crowns.

Here is the link to the winners. We competed for a Digital Crown and only one other California school won the same award. Other California schools won Gold in the hybrid category.

For more photos, visit Rock and Worship Road Show and Elementary track and field.

By |2015-03-23T00:00:00+00:00March 23rd, 2015|FC Arts, News, Photos 2014-15, Uncategorized|0 Comments

COMMENTARY: Journalism helps improve writing skills

StaffPhotoFeather file photo

The Feather gathered for their annual staff photo in October 2014 on the Peoples Church campus lawn.

This is my first year taking journalism and it has majorly affected my writing skills. Though it is not a walk in the park, it can be fun and also very helpful. I have to be committed and responsible to be in publications.

A journalist involves working outside of your comfort zone, which presents opportunities to gain self-confidence and self-esteem.

The Feather adviser, Greg Stobbe, has taught me many things about how to write and how not to write. The tools that journalism offers can be used in everyday life, not just in publications. You can also take photojournalism which focuses on take pictures and videos of events that are happening.

I was a little hesitant about joining this class but with Stobbe always telling me to join, and a friend?s persuasion, I joined. I had thought about how these writing skills can benefit me in the future, especially in college. It took me three weeks to write my first article. Day by day I try to increase the efficiency and speed of writing my articles.

The writing skills you acquire from this class sticks to you. It will help you when you write essays for your english class or in future articles you will write. Journalism is one of the few subjects that can fully train students for skills that are essential to the job field. It can also bring attention to some colleges and they may reach out to you.

I have experienced the positive and negative sides of journalism. Though this is my first year taking journalism; it gave me the opportunity to meet new people. While I did not start as the best writer, and I still am not the best, journalism is helping me get better. — Sophomore Natalie Torres

Many consider journalism an easy A elective when in reality it is one of the the harder classes you can take. Students need to write two to three new articles each month or their grades will drop significantly.

Stobbe has high expectations for the articles that go up on The Feather. The more you write, the more you learn. He can be funny and mess around sometimes but he can also be very serious and focused at other times. One of the first things he shows you is what not to do.

I have learned I should always introduce the person before the quote and do not use contractions and now know the importance of show don’t tell. I’m still working on not using helping verbs.

Throughout the year I have been improving in my writing skills an am contemplating signing up for publications class again next year. But I do know that journalism helps improves writing skills.

I have experienced the positive and negative sides of journalism. Though this is my first year taking journalism; it gave me the opportunity to meet new people. While I did not start as the best writer, and I still am not the best, journalism is helping me get better.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @nataliatorres1.

For more opinions, read the March 5 article, Community reflects on life of Molly Griffin.

By |2015-03-19T00:00:00+00:00March 19th, 2015|Commentary, FC Arts, Uncategorized|0 Comments

FC hits NY: Day 4 (SLIDESHOW)

DSC_7293Ryan King, Photographer

With two days of touring behind them, Feather editors and adviser Greg Stobbe pose in from of the Freedom Tower in NYC before they visit the 9-11 Memorial Museum, March 19.

With two full days in New York under their belts, the editors prepared themselves for their third full day in the city. One more day and the team will spend the rest of the week at Columbia University for the Columbia Scholastic Press Association’s 91st convention.

Warm clothes were strongly suggested and the group departed from the hotel at 9:30 a.m to take the subway as FC hits NY and visit the 9/11 Memorial.

The 9-11 Memorial has been in the stages of construction since 2007 and is still being added to. The highlight of the site was the museum dedicated to honoring those who lost their lives and their loved ones.

After the memorial, the editors made their way down Wall Street and popped in to the Trinity Church. Following the cathedral the group made their way to Battery Park where they watched street dancers perform and viewed the Statue of Liberty from afar.

From there, the girls made their way back to Times Square to shop freely and the boys took a trip to Grand Central Station before returning back to Times Square to shop.

The group met up at 7:45 p.m. to make their way to the 8 p.m. Broadway showing of An American in Paris and ate a late dinner at TGI Fridays.

First timer in New York City, Trevor Beal, shares his impressions of the city along with his favorite aspects of the trip.

“This is my first time ever being in NYC,” Beal said, “I have been to other big cities before but none compare to NYC, Grand Central Station and Wall Street have been my favorite parts of the trip so far, along with the Phantom of the Opera play and 911 Memorial Museum.”

Chloe Mueller, Editor-in-Chief, says she will enjoy giving a session at the 91st CSPA Journalism Convention at Columbia University.

“This year gave me a new look on the trip because we are teaching sessions at Columbia University,” Mueller said. “But the sightseeing is still fun. I loved the 9/11 Memorial.”

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @gaby_siqueros.

For more news, read the March 18 article, FC hits NY: Day 2 (SLIDESHOW, VIDEO).

FC hits NY: Day 2 (SLIDESHOW, VIDEO)

GroupHotelDay2Greg Stobbe, adviser

While the group still needs to tighten up sessions for the CSPA convention, Feather editors gather in the lobby of Hotel Edison before they embark on a day of touring Manhattan, March 17.

The Feather editors started their first day of tourism in New York City on the holy day for the Irish: St. Patty’s Day, March 17. With a couple of days dedicated to checking out the Big Apple before attending and speaking at the 91st annual Columbia Scholastic Press Association’s (CSPA) convention, today FC hits NY.

Attempting to avoid a sea of green chaos, adviser Greg Stobbe suggested the team spend most of their day in Little Italy and Soho, eating and shopping. The staff departed Hotel Edison at 8:15 a.m. and made their way to the nearest subway station before the parades and celebrators crowded Times Square.

Not eating before their departure, the staff insisted that the first thing they do in Little Italy was get breakfast before treading onward to shopping. Heading the cries of his people, Stobbe led his staff to Ferrara: an Italian bakery and cafe with a wide range of different kinds of food options. Though breakfast meats were available, many of the students opted for the pastries.

After finishing breakfast the female staffers abandoned their male counterparts to get an early start on their shopping, leaving the men behind in the cafe in favor of rushing to Soho and all its stores had to offer. Their shopping spree was short lived, however, as a couple of the girls fell ill and left Soho early to get back to the comfort of their hotel rooms.

Though the women were down for the count, the men endured through the elements and their check balances. Before impending bankruptcy set itself upon them, Stobbe intervened and called the men to Il Palazzo where they enjoyed an authentic Italian lunch. The boys left for the hotel at 2 p.m. and arrived at around 2:30 p.m.

Having about five hours of rest time before the first play of the New York trip, students took full advantage of this opportunity to get much needed shut eye. Many of the students stayed awake from Monday morning to Tuesday afternoon without sleep, easily achieving an “all-nighter.”

After the five-hour nap, the students woke from their dens and began preparing for the first play of many on their trip. Upon departing the hotel 7:10 p.m. everyone soon felt the nose numbing wind that New York had to offer. Racing from the subways and the streets the team eventually made their way to the first play, The King and I, which began 8 p.m. and ended at 11 p.m.

Once the play ended, hunger soon plagued the students again. They left the theatre and moved to the subways to get back to Times Square. Upon arriving, the team immediately spotted an Applebees and moved like predatory animals towards this beacon. Once they finished their food everyone departed for the hotel and arrived at 12:30 a.m.

Most of the Feather staff went to their rooms and prepared the next day for the journalism conference at Columbia University.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @RRoggenstein.

For more about The Feather in NY, read the March 16 article, FC hits NY: Day 1 (Slideshow, Video).

FC hits NY: Day 1 (SLIDESHOW, VIDEO)

IMG_6974Adviser Greg Stobbe

Nine Feather editors are traveling to NY to attend and speak at the 91st annual Columbia Scholastic Press Association’s convention. The staff arrives in Times Square ready for a night tour, March 16.

After arriving to San Francisco the night before, a total of nine journalists boarded the plane on Monday, heading to New York, March 16. Editors Rees Rogenstein, Josh Carter, Chloe Mueller, Gaby Siquiros, Ryan King, Callista Fries, Trevor Beal, John Dooman, Sara Peterson and chaperones Angie Fries and adviser Greg Stobbe arrive at the airport around 8 a.m. and will tour that evening as FC hits NY.

The Feather staff will be heading to Columbia University, for the 91st annual CSPA Spring Convention, March, 18-20. Along with being nominated for the Gold Crown by the Columbia Scholastic Press Association (CSPA), Fries, King, Peterson and Mueller will be presenting workshops during the convention. Throughout their stay, the editors will also spend two days touring Manhattan.

While at the CSPA Spring Convention, editors will be attending classes and workshops relating to journalism and school run newspapers. At the end of the Spring Convention, The Feather staff will attend the 2015 Online Digital Crown Awards ceremony, in which they will receive either a Silver or Gold crown.

After arriving in New York around, 7:30 p.m., the staff departed from the JFK airport and headed towards their home for the next week, the Hotel Edison.

Upon arrival students dropped off their luggage and headed to Juniors for a late dinner and then traveled to the subway to buy their metro passes for the week.

Students then took a quick tour of Times Square and headed back to their hotel, to work on articles, and to get some much needed rest.

EDITORS NOTE: Stay tuned for daily updates including slideshows and videos as FC hits NY.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @rynnking_.

For more news, read the March 13 article, Blood Drive honors FC alumna currently in recovery.

Music department earns Heritage Sweepstakes (PODCAST, SLIDESHOW)

Festival1Susan Ainley

The campus music department was honored with the Sweepstakes Award at the Worldstrides Heritage Music Festival, March 5-6. Seniors Ivette Ibarra and Andrew Guthrie, pictured, won Maestro awards, while Guthrie also won the “When you Wish” award.

Senior Andrew Guthrie earns Maestro, “When You Wish” honors

Every year students from the music department embark on a journey to Southern California to attend a singing festival, while either going to Worldstrides Heritage or ACSI. These festivals are to commemorate all the long hours practicing as a whole to put on a performance for high ranking adjudicators.

At 12 p.m., FC students boarded the charter bus en route to the 35th annual Worldstrides Heritage Music Festival, down to Los Angeles, California, March 5-6. Directors Susan Ainley and Lesley Bannister have never traveled to compete in this Southern California music festival, being new to their positions this year.

While attending the festival for the duration of their trip, they were able to visit Medieval Times, as well as Disneyland and participate in other recreational activities. Students were able to visit many sites in LA, but the majority of the trip was spent preparing and performing for the Heritage Festival competitions.

After getting back on the bus, students waited to arrive in LA. They visited Medieval Times around 6 p.m. where students saw the reenactments of duels and jousting. While watching the battles food that was served to the audience. Sophomore Trevor Trevino

“It was so fun, I loved the battles and the food was amazing. Probably it was because I was very hungry from traveling all day,” Trevino said. “I loved the environment that I was in, it made me want to become a knight and go battle.”

After the show students arrived at their final destination for the day, WYNDHAM Hotel. Students boarded the bus early at 7 a.m. on their way to Disneyland and California Adventure. Upon their arrival, students dispersed into small groups and visited different rides in the amusement parks.

I loved getting to try the authentic southern food in New Orleans Square. I had never tasted American food from the south. My favorite food was the authentic Gumbo. It had chicken, shrimp, and sausage with a creamy sauce all over rice. I want to try to find a restaurant that has this type food back in Fresno. –Junior Olivia Tandajaja

One of the most popular rides of the day was the new Cars ride. Senior Andrew Guthrie rode the Cars ride for the first time, and was impressed by the roller coaster type thrill ride and the layout.

“When we first got to Disneyland, and I saw a group of people headed over to Cars Land, I wanted follow them since I’ve never been on the ride before,” Guthrie said. “People had told me it was a really fun ride but it wasn’t until I saw it firsthand that I could truly appreciate it. I loved how you drove through the different rooms leading up to the race, but my favorite part of the ride was of course was the race itself.”

With a variety of different restaurants around the parks, foods from Asian, to South American, European were all available to students. Junior Olivia Tandajaja enjoyed foods from the south the most.

“I loved getting to try the authentic southern food in New Orleans Square,” Tandajaja said. “I had never tasted American food from the south. My favorite food was the authentic Gumbo. It had chicken, shrimp, and sausage with a creamy sauce all over rice. I want to try to find a restaurant that has this type food back in Fresno.”

Vice President of Heritage Festival Kyle Naylor discusses the effectiveness of the Heritage Music Festival

The following day band and choir had separate because of different of their different venue locations. Band had to be on their stage at 8:30 a.m., while choir had to arrive a little later, around 10 a.m. Band practiced through their songs before the actual performance.

After performing several songs, the band was adjudicated by three judges. Not all three spoke to the band, only one judge went up on stage with a given time of four minutes to critique the band.

After band had finished the performance they went out into the lobby where choir had arrived a short while before. The members of the band changed into more comfortable clothes to prepare for the second day of Disneyland, while choir began practicing for their upcoming performance.

After both the choir and band had finished their performances, everyone packed up and were ready to visit Disneyland one last time. Unlike the previous day where students were given bouncer tickets to which they could go to Disneyland and California Adventure, students could only wander in Disneyland.

One group had to wait an hour and ten minutes to board Space Mountain, but this provided opportunities for students to converse and learn new things about their peers outside of school. Senior Anthony Zhang had never been to Disneyland before. One of the things he disliked about Disneyland was definitely the wait for the rides.

“Disneyland was really fun, and I got to see why everyone loves Disneyland so much,” Zhang said. “But one thing I didn’t like was how I had to wait a long time to get on a ride. One ride called Space Mountain we had to wait for an hour and a some minutes. What was nice about you and your friends being stuck in line was that you could talk to them and see what they are like outside of school. I really liked that.”

I am so proud of my students. They have put in a lot of hard work, and many hours of practice. It is so exciting to see their efforts rewarded in such a meaningful way. To achieve a gold star rating as my first year as band director is so exciting, also to have our music program recognized with the sweepstakes reward is a sign of great things to come. –Leslie Bannister, band director

The concert hall, located in Big Thunder Mountain, where the awards took place was very open and no chairs were in visible. Music directors had their own section with chairs, while students sat on the ground with their appropriate schools. The opening ceremony of the awards ceremony began with “Goofy”, “Mickey Mouse”, “Pluto”, and “Daffy Duck” all dancing with a group of singers. After they had done their dance routine a wizard had come on stage to help present the awards with the Vice President of Heritage Kyle Naylor.

Heritage Festival awards, presented by Naylor, honored band and choir, where they earned honors: gold for jazz band and womens ensemble, silver for high school choir and junior high choir. Senior Ivette Ibarra and Guthrie won the maestro awards, and Guthrie also won the “When you Wish” award. The school music program won overall top prize earning the Heritage Sweepstakes Award.

Bannister was proud of her students as well as the Music Department as a whole. While this is only Bannister’s first year as band director, she excited to see how much of the work practicing payed off.

“I am so proud of my students. They have put in a lot of hard work, and many hours of practice,” Bannister said. “It is so exciting to see their efforts rewarded in such a meaningful way. To achieve a gold star rating as my first year as band director is so exciting, also to have our music program recognized with the sweepstakes reward is a sign of great things to come.”

Ainley was astounded by her choir group winning the best overall music program. Along with Bannister, this was also her first year as high school choir director.

“This is my first trip to Heritage as a high school choir teacher and I feel like it was the best possible experience for both teachers and students,” Ainley said. “Winning the sweepstakes trophy literally took my breath away, and I felt so humbled and honored that they would recognize the hard work that all Fresno Christian students do in order to achieve their very best.”

The writer can be reached via Twitter: @KevinGarcha.

For more features, read the March 10 article, Teen dating: The struggle.

By |2015-03-11T00:00:00+00:00March 11th, 2015|FC Arts, Features, Music, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

BRIEF: Choir to attend Heritage Festival, March 5-8

FC file photo

The choir, ladies ensemble, jazz band will all attend the Worldstrides Heritage Music Festival, March 5-8.

The FC band and choral groups will be traveling to the Los Angeles area to participate in the Worldstrides Heritage Festival program, March 5-8.

The choral groups sing and play prepared repertoire for three judges, or adjudicators. These professional musicians and college professors grade each group based on a series of various factors such as tone, balance, diction and musicality.

Another reason to sing and play at festivals is to hear other groups perform. This gives students a chance to listen to other music, and inspire them to become better musicians. The highest score is usually 100 points, with 90-100 being “Superior.”

This festival hands out rankings as well, with trophies awarded in several categories. If a group is particularly advanced, the adjudicators can invite them to a “Gold” festival, which is usually held at Carnegie Hall in New York City.

The FC women’s ensemble has been invited to the Gold Festival before, but has not attended. All the choral groups are working diligently on festival repertoire. Each song must have a high level of difficulty, and cross over different eras and styles of music. For example, the HS choir will sing a Latin piece called “Jubilate Deo,” performed acapella.

They will also sing a Canadian folk song entitled “Rattle on the Stovepipe.” Lastly, they are singing a spiritual melody, “1 Peter 3:15”, which features soloists Andrew Guthrie, Elise Winegarden and Ivette Ibarra will be presenting to the judges. This year, ladies ensemble will attend Heritage as well as the junior high choir, high school band and choir. The groups will depart from school at lunch on Thursday, March 5, and will be traveling to their hotel in Irvine. Dinner will be provided at Medieval Times, and Friday will be spent at Disneyland.

Newly appointed high school choir director Susan Ainley, talks about the Heritage Festival.

With this being my second year on the Heritage trip, I’m really looking forward to Disneyland which is gonna be a lot of fun especially with friends. I’m also really excited to stay at the hotel because the previous year we had a really great time watching movies and hanging out. I am very confident in our ability to execute our performance perfectly and with no setbacks. We have really go soloists that really set us apart from other choral groups. –Junior Andrew Moore

“I am especially looking forward to the day at Disneyland, since my daughter, Bree Ainley, works there,” Ainley said. “Saturday will be spent at the Rose Center Theatre in Westminster, performing the set of songs prepared. Once the festival has finished, the students will eat dinner, then head back to Disneyland for the awards ceremony. The long weekend will likely finish in the early hours of Sunday morning, as the bus rolls back into the FC parking lot.”

Andrew Moore, ’16, talks about his experience and thoughts on the Heritage Festival.

“With this being my second year on the Heritage trip I’m really looking forward to Disneyland which is gonna be a lot of fun especially with friends,” Moore said. “I’m also really excited to stay at the hotel because the previous year we had a really great time watching movies and hanging out. I am very confident in our ability to execute our performance perfectly and with no setbacks. We have really go soloists that really set us apart from other choral groups.”

While singing is the reason to head south, Hannah Nale, ’17, has another reason to travel.

“I’m super stoked for going to Disneyland with all of my friends and just having a bunch of fun,” Nale said. “We have super cool songs and a super cool conductor and we have a super cool group of people. With this being my first time on the trip, it would be an amazing experience to get the gold and hopefully we as a family will be able to come together and accomplish that.”

While freshman Celeste Counts is excited about Disneyland, she is concerned about her role in the festival.

“I am most looking forward to hanging out with my friends at Disneyland,” Counts said. “I’m not exactly sure how I’ll stand out from the competition, but I hope that my good vowel shape and discipline will help me with that. This is my second year going to the Festival trip and it seems to get more and more fun every year.”

These writers can be reached via Twitter: @_jadenventura03 and @Devin_pits1735.

For more news, read the March 3 article, Student leadership: FCS 32nd annual auction is March 14.

By |2015-03-04T00:00:00+00:00March 4th, 2015|Community Events, FC Arts, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Social media promotes scholastic journalism awareness (STORIFY)

StaffSJW15Twitter and Storify illustration

The Feather Online is participating in Scholastic Journalism Week, Feb. 22-28. The staff will also participate, follow the Hashtag #SJW2015.

With National Scholastic Journalism Week, sponsored by the Journalism Education Association (JEA), mass media has been seen on Twitter and Instagram with the hashtag #SJW2015. Throughout the week, students posted on social media in an effect to promote Journalism Education, Feb. 22-28.

The organization encourages student journalists to raise awareness, promoting its significance to the community. The event was geared towards those apart of a educational journalism program, community members, including readers and students, to spread awareness.

National Scholastic Journalism Week was created for the support of the First Amendment which states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

Throughout the week, The Feather watched both medias, by creating the hashtag: #FCJW as well as the original #SJW2015. Approximately 100 posts were involved with the hashtag throughout Instagram as well as Twitter.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.

For more on National Scholastic Journalism Week, read the Feb. 23 articles, BRIEF: Scholastic Journalism Week, Feb. 22-28 (VIDEO), and Scholastic Journalism Week 2015: Join the discussion.

For more news, read the March 2 article, BRIEF: Leadership, journalism students to attend Kids Day, March 3.

By |2015-03-02T00:00:00+00:00March 2nd, 2015|Announcements, FC Arts, FC Events, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

COLUMN: Thankful for Scholastic Journalism Week 2015

ReesFeather file photo

Junior, Rees Roggenstein, expresses his thoughts on journalism and urges other to celebrate Scholastic Journalism Week.

Journalism or publication classes in a nutshell teach students to write articles, publish them and do a small amount of social media promotion. On the surface journalism prepares people for work in the media. But beneath the surface, beneath this shallow idea of journalists, there is a wealth of practical and applicable knowledge beyond what other classes could possibly teach.

To those who are patient and respect the process of reputable journalism, the benefits could almost be endless. Even on the surface the skills this class teaches is incredibly useful, and on a deeper level journalism can expand one’s perspective.

Producing articles results in better writing skills, conducting interviews improves basic conversation skills, and working with media and social media is now necessary in most colleges and businesses. Even on the most basic surface journalism is still useful for equipping people for the real world.

On a deeper level this class still has much to offer. It can expand one’s limited perspectives; publications classes require reporters or guest writers to visit places and talk to people they otherwise would never know.

The opportunity to get outside my comfort zone, to interview people, to observe, and to learn from others is a lifeskill. For me, it expands my horizons and opened doors I did not think could be opened. Journalism enriches my high school career in ways other classes have not done yet.

More specifically, The Feather shows me things I did not think I would see and helps me build relationships with people I will remember for a long time. The people on The Feather staff teach me how to think for myself, to articulate my opinions, and to look at all perspectives of a topic to find the whole truth. These are gifts one cannot put a monetary value on.

So to those who have an opinion they want to share, to those who want to report the truth, to those who want to express themselves to the world, come join with journalists this Scholastic Journalism Week. Come and celebrate our right to freedom of speech, come and celebrate the ability to express ourselves, and come and celebrate the journalists for embodying this liberty.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather,  Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.This writer can be reached via Twitter: @RRoggenstein.

For more opinions, read the Feb. 22 article, COLLEGE CORNER: College Placement Tests.

By |2015-02-27T00:00:00+00:00February 27th, 2015|Column, FC Arts, Uncategorized|0 Comments

#SJW2015: Importance of Scholastic Journalism Week (Video)

ChloeAlexis Kalugin | The Feather Online Archive

Juniors Rees Roggenstein and Chloe Mueller share in assembly the importance of scholastic journalism, Feb. 23.

Publication students throughout the nation will be celebrating the art of Journalism during Scholastic Journalism Week, Feb. 22-28. This yearly event, sponsored by the Journalism Education Association (JEA) was created to raise student awareness about their First Amendment rights and civic responsibility.

Scholastic Journalism Week is used to promote the efforts of high school journalism students throughout the nation. This year the JEA has chosen “Our Staff at Work” as the logo to motivate people to see the efforts of student publications and The Feather staff wants to share the importance of scholastic journalism.

National Scholastic Journalism Week was created for the support of the First Amendment which states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

Editor-in-Chief Chloe Mueller gives insight into the celebration of Scholastic Journalism Week and student publications throughout the nation.

“Throughout the school year, various journalism-centered events occur, but this particular event is unique,” Mueller said. “This week delves a layer deeper into journalism and what it means by exploring the First Amendment and its role in the realm of publications.”

National Scholastic Journalism Week was created for the support of the First Amendment which states, ‘Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.’

The Feather will be taking a student survey asking what the campus would like to see on The Feather and will include the results in an info-gram. This year in honor of promoting journalism week, The Feather staff has also created a hashtag for Twitter: #FCJW as well as #SJW2015 which will appear on The Feather’s Storify. Please share why the First Amendment is important to students’ voices today.

To ensure that the school is staying up to date with journalism week, The Feather is putting on a friendly competition. The campus student who tweets and includes #FCJW the most this week, will win a $15 gift card of their choosing.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_sarapeterson.

For more videos, check out Girls soccer hosts Frazier Mountain for D-VI championship (Video).

By |2015-02-25T00:00:00+00:00February 25th, 2015|FC Arts, Features, Uncategorized, Videos 2014-15|0 Comments

BREAKING: Feather receives NSPA All-American rating

nspalogo_twitter_400x400NSPA

For the fifth year in a row The Feather recieved an All-American rating and five out five marks of distinction from the National Scholastic Press Association (NSPA) who released their annual web critique, Feb. 23.

For the fifth year in a row The Feather recieved an All-American rating and five out five marks of distinction from the National Scholastic Press Association (NSPA) who released their annual web critique for 2014, Feb. 23.

The Feather scored the top in all five essential categories: Coverage and Content, Interactivity and Community, Breaking News, Design and Navigation and Rich Media along with scores from Student Work Credit and Frequencie of Update Credit.

With the combination of the five high score in all five categories and the two extra sections, The Feather receives NSPA All-American rating and a score of 3,992/4,300 points.

Feather adviser Greg Stobbe expresses his gratitude for the nomination, but acknowledges that there is still more work to come for staffers.

“While earning another All-American nod demonstrates The Feather staff’s proficiency,” Stobbe said, “I’m fully aware of the weaknesses and realities of producing a daily online paper. This award is just a step to honor first semester’s work, and it’s nice to know the things I’m pushing the staff to do have been pointed out by an independent judge. I’m thankful for the review, but the season is not over.”

Starr Sackstein, World Journalism Prep School, critiqued The Feather and shared her thoughts of the website.

“It was an absolute pleasure navigating though your website,” Sackstein said. “I’m hoping to share it with my students as I feel they can learn a lot from what you guys are doing.”

Chloe Mueller, Editor-in-Chief, shares her opinion on the review and how it has affected her motivation to carry out the rest of the semester.

“Here at the lab, we’ve been awaiting this review for awhile,” Mueller said. “I was very excited to receive the critique and more than satisfied with the results of our work. This is my first year serving as Editor-in-Chief, and this just goes to show that what we do here pays off. This is definitely a motivator for us – and myself – to continue striving through the year.”

FC’s web site critique scoresheet:

Coverage and Content: 900/1000
Interactivity and Community: 950/1000
Breaking News:450/500
Design and Navigation: 900/1000
Rich Media: 500/500
Student work credit: 92/100
Frequency of update: 200/200

Total score: 3992/4300

Follow The Feather via Twitter and Instagram: @thefeather and @thefeatheronlilne. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_sarapeterson.

For more news, read the Feb. 23 article, BRIEF: Scholastic Journalism Week, Feb. 22-28 .

By |2015-02-24T00:00:00+00:00February 24th, 2015|FC Arts, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

BRIEF: Scholastic Journalism Week, Feb. 22-28 (Video)

2015_SJW_Poster-475x300JEA

Scholastic Journalism Week is used to promote the efforts of high school journalism students throughout the nation.

Publication students throughout the nation will be celebrating the art of Journalism during Scholastic Journalism Week, Feb. 22-28. This yearly event, sponsored by the Journalism Education Association (JEA) was created to raise student awareness about their First Amendment rights and civic responsibility.

Scholastic Journalism Week is used to promote the efforts of high school journalism students throughout the nation. This year the JEA has chosen “Our Staff at Work” as the logo to motivate people to see the efforts of student publications.

National Scholastic Journalism Week was created for the support of the First Amendment which states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

Chloe Mueller, Editor-in-Chief, gives insight into the celebration of Scholastic Journalism Week and student publications throughout the nation.

“Throughout the school year, various journalism-centered events occur, but this particular event is unique,” Mueller said. “This week delves a layer deeper into journalism and what it means by exploring the First Amendment and its role in the realm of publications.”

Throughout the school year, various journalism-centered events occur, but this particular event is unique. This week delves a layer deeper into journalism and what it means by exploring the First Amendment and its role in the realm of publications. — Chloe Mueller, co-editor-in-chief

The Feather will be taking a student survey asking what the campus would like to see on The Feather and will include the results in an info-gram. This year in honor of promoting journalism week, The Feather staff has also created a hashtag for Twitter: #FCJW as well as #SJW2015 which will appear on The Feather’s Storify. Please share why the First Amendment is important to students’ voices today.

To ensure that the school is staying up to date with journalism week, The Feather is putting on a friendly competition. The campus student who tweets and includes #FCJW the most this week, will win a $15 gift card of their choosing.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_sarapeterson.

For more news, read the Feb. 20 article, BRIEF: Winter Sports Banquet welcomes athletes, Feb. 23.

By |2015-02-23T00:00:00+00:00February 23rd, 2015|FC Arts, News, Uncategorized|4 Comments

Scholastic Journalism Week 2015: Join the discussion

StaffSJWJeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

As The Feather has been headlining student events, featuring stories about Homecoming, issues of social equality and the sport season beginnings, this week the tables are reversed. To promote the importance of school publications, the Journalism Education Association (JEA) has sponsored the annual Scholastic Journalism Week, Feb. 22-28.

The organization encourages student journalists to raise awareness, promoting its significance to the community. Along with a student created poster template, the JEA has listed several ideas for student and publication adviser participants.

While the event is geared towards those apart of a educational journalism program, community members, including readers and students can get involved. Throughout the week, The Feather will be watching social media including Twitter and Instagram, by creating a hashtag: #FCJW as well as #SJW2015 which will appear in a Storify collection.

National Scholastic Journalism Week was created for the support of the First Amendment which states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

Responses from staff writers, editors and advisers, were documented in order to highlight the significance of journalism education not just nationwide, but locally.

The Feather wants to encourage students and readers to submit their opinions in the comment section on the effects of journalism and why seeking out and reporting the news is important. Please consider adding to or joining Scholastic Journalism Week 2015: Join the discussion.

Relevance of the world
Emily Ladd, ’16
Feb. 27, 2015

“What’s going on in the world is extremely relevant, especially seeing as everyone lives in it. Journalists and people alike should seek news, but journalists make what’s important known and more accessible to everyone, finding all facts they can. Journalism raises awareness for the events around us.”

Freedom of speech: A beautiful gift
Rees Roggenstein, ’16
Feb. 27, 2015

“Scholastic Journalism Week is incredibly important, and not just to journalists and those involved with media. It exemplifies the right to freedom of speech that we as Americans have been afforded, which is a gift that is not freely given. It is a time to express one’s opinion in complete and brutal honesty. It is a time to truly express one’s freedom of speech. This is a week that all who practice freedom of speech can celebrate such a beautiful gift.”

Epitome of student journalism
Kathryn Damschen, ’15
Feb. 27, 2015

“Scholastic Journalism Week is the epitome of student journalism. It is a week solely dedicated to the media, news, and information that we gather each and every day. I personally believe it is a great endeavor to be a part of, as it brings awareness to what we do as a whole (being a part of a journalism staff). It is critical to be knowledgable of the work you do and why you’re apart of such a ting, if anything. My thoughts are, what good is doing something if you don’t know what it is or why you’re doing it?”

News 24/7
Michael Fu, ’16
Feb. 27, 2015

“The importance of journalist went out to seek the new and report it is because without the motivation to seek the news or to report them. The society has no way other than having the eye witness the even that happened in front of them to discovered the things happen in school, town or the whole nation. The journalist who seek the news allow the people to connect each other and form a bobble where everyone know what is going on in this very moment. Without the journalist, the people have to look for the news 24/7 by themselves in order to keep up with the world. As a conclusion, we as a journalist who seek the news and report them allows others to be aware of things happened around them and bring the community closer than it was before.”

[/fusion_builder_column]

StaffSJW15Jeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

 

Face and fix society
Toby Pan, ’15
Feb. 27, 2015

“America is not the only country that have the freedom of speech stated in the Constitution, but it is one of the few countries that have this important right widely applied to their people on a daily basis. Unlike some of the countries whose media industries are controlled by the government, the journalists here are endowed with considerable freedom to express their own opinions. On top of that, the journalists’ good work ensured that the public are informed of what’s happening domestically and globally; so that Americans, although have made a lot of mistakes, can always face and fix their society on time.”

Spreading the Word
Chloe Mueller, Editor-in-Chief
Feb. 26, 2015

“On campus, I don’t think journalism is viewed as relative to the lives of students unless they are directly involved with the class. This week gives us – as journalists – a chance to spread the word and importance of journalism to our classmates who don’t prioritize it.”

Exposing the Truth
Justin Houts, Writer
Feb. 26, 2015

“It’s important for journalists to seek the news and report it; by doing so we can insure that our rights and enforce rules and laws. It’s news reporting that exposed Watergate, the Clinton scandal, and many other historical events that wouldn’t have otherwise been made known had they not been exposed by journalists. The U.S. is one of the few countries that allows it’s citizens to speak freely about their beliefs and ideas, and if we don’t use this opportunity to the fullest potential its being wasted and not taken as the privilege it truly is.”

Week of opportunities
Olivia Quebe, ’16
Feb. 23, 2015

“I see Scholastic Journalism Week as an opportunity to make people aware of the importance of journalism. It is a way to get the students involved and informed not only during this week, but for the rest of the year. I’m excited to see the responses of the students and special events to come.”

Educate ourselves
Trevor Beal, News Editor
Feb. 23, 2015

“In my opinion it is important for journalists of all ages to seek out the real news because without that key characteristic we risk becoming mindless believers of mass media. Our job is to educate ourselves and others in current affairs and how we are affected by them.”

Its a big deal
Sydney Belmont, ’17
Feb. 23, 2015

“Scholastic Journalism Week is a huge deal. Students are encouraged to promote journalism. It is a way to get the student body involved and informed about what is going on during the week. I am looking forward to all the excitement involved in this week.”

Journalism happenings
Natalia Torres, ’16
Feb. 23, 2015

“Scholastic Journalism week is the week to promote journalism. Students who are already in journalism should be informing others about what journalism is about and about joining journalism. This way the student body can be updated on what events are happening as they are happening.”

A journalist’s perspective
John Dooman, Reviews Editor
Feb. 23, 2015

“Every journalists needs to report on certain stories to provide their own take on it. Two journalists would report a story in their own way from their own, unique point of view. This allows readers and/or viewers to come to their own conclusions on how news is covered.”

Club recognition
Jenny King, ’17
Feb. 23, 2015

“Scholastic Journalism Week is really exciting; as a club on the campus, this week is a recognition of the hard work that the staff puts in. It’s a fun way for students and staffers to be involved in their school newspaper.”

Effective reporting
Sara Peterson, Editor-in-Chief
Feb. 23, 2015

“Journalists need to report because it gives themselves and people around them insight into what is happening locally or in the world. Our job as journalist is to effectively report and share these stories with our fellow man.”

Think, Engage, Teach
Greg Stobbe, Publications Adviser
Feb. 23, 2015

“Journalists, and I’m being inclusive of Feather reporters, have an obligation to seek out and report the news, profiles, stories and issues that are important to their constituencies {peers} and community. This is an obligation, not whether they ‘feel like it.’ The Feather staff in particular is charged to present to the greater Fresno community who Fresno Christian citizens are and represent them. The journalists on this campus need to bear witness and independently write and comment on the news and the controversies, its peoples’ failures and success, struggles and the stories of overcoming, calling into question when peers are not morally or ethically responsible and report the accomplishments and/or consequences. The Feather staff must give fair, accurate perspective to the goings on, in and around the Fresno Christian community. They are not just to watch but to stimulate conversation so as to engage fellow students to listen, dialogue and act on truth so that the community not only knows it but also uses it in relationship. Think responsible. Be engaged. Teach the tools of citizenship.”

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @rynnking_.

For more features, read the Feb. 20 article, Fresno hosts horror movie, to be released nationally.

By |2015-02-23T00:00:00+00:00February 23rd, 2015|Community Events, FC Arts, Features, Uncategorized|1 Comment

Get to Know: Andrew Guthrie

Andrew1Jason Swain | The Feather Online Archive

Senior Andrew Guthrie gave his testimony during chapel, Jan. 22.

Senior Andrew Guthrie gave his testimony during chapel, Jan. 22. Guthrie shared about the trials he has endured throughout his life. He specifically spoke about his junior year when his mother and three of his grandparents passed away. Guthrie encouraged the crowd to lean on God’s strength during difficult times.

Quebe: Was this your first time sharing your testimony? If so, why have you not shared it before? What was going through your mind?

Guthrie: Yes, I have never actually given a testimony like that before, mainly because I never thought anyone would care to hear it or be affected by it. But while speaking, I realized that it was making an impact by the responses I got from others in the school, so that helped me keep talking.

Quebe: What was the one thing you wanted people to remember about your testimony?

Guthrie: I wanted people to realize that although I’m not necessarily done with my struggles, I have seen how amazing God’s help had been over these past several years, even if they were small things at the time. The little helpful actions can drastically help later.

Quebe: Why do you feel that is something important to remember?

Guthrie: Sometimes we want a huge change, or are overlooking the small steps God has for us to reach a much better place. Overlooking these small steps will leave you stuck behind.

Quebe: What is your encouragement to someone going through similar struggles?

Guthrie: That there is some good in all the bad you may be facing. God has strengthened me through the struggles I have faced, and even though I have had a difficult 2014, I am stronger and better built in Christ.

Quebe: Do you think going to FCS helped you at all to get through life’s struggles? If so, how? Who is one person you feel had a major impact on your life? How?

Guthrie: Yes, I think FCS has helped me through my struggles and has strengthened me immensely by providing a place where there are people who want to connect and be together.

Sometimes we want a huge change, or are overlooking the small steps God has for us to reach a much better place. Overlooking these small steps will leave you stuck behind. –Senior Andrew Guthrie

Quebe: Who is one person you feel had a major impact on your life? How?

Guthrie: Someone who has greatly reached out to me and been like a brother is Jordan Castro, who always gave me a different view on my issues so that I can see them as God strengthening me, not hurting.

Quebe: Do you think you will ever share your testimony again? Why or why not?

Guthrie: Yes, I would share it over and over if it helped even one person. I don’t expect my story to be any more powerful than others, but it is sincere, and I think people need to hear true stories from those they can relate to.

Please feel free to comment about what you took away from Guthrie’s testimony.

Follow The Feather via Twitter and Instagram: @thefeather and @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_olivialoren_.

For more features, read the Feb. 3 article, Where are they now? Todd Bennett.

By |2015-02-04T00:00:00+00:00February 4th, 2015|FC Arts, Features, Uncategorized|1 Comment

Home economics whips up treats for a good cause (VIDEO)

IMG_0394Kylie Bell

Students in Sharon Scharf’s home economics class are preparing treats to send to soldiers overseas.

Class makes cookies for Army Member

For years, the home economics department has worked to touch others with their handiwork. In the past several years, home economics is striving to not only benefit members of the school and community through their work, but to stretch their reach beyond the bounds of Fresno County.

Friday, Nov. 21, both periods of home ec. whipped up piles of cookies for a noble cause. Home ec. teacher, Sharon Scharf, has connections to a member of our Army member LTC Eric Ogborn, and decided to support his cause through her work on campus.

The batches of cookies were sent to LTC Ogborn, who is currently stationed in Germany but deployed in Afganistan. Scharf explains how the cookies were made.

“We made 16 dozen cookies,” Scharf said. “We use a recipe I have that uses coconut and the coconut keeps them fresh and prevents them from breaking up. Then, we wrap each one individually in aluminum foil, which cushions them and keeps them fresh.”

Scharf and her home ec. crew began shipping out their treats thirteen years ago. The tradition started with her nephew, who was stationed in Afghanistan.

“We started making cookies in 2001,” Scharf said. “The first set was to my nephew who was with the 82 airborn. He was one of the first ones to go into Afghanistan. When LTC Eric Ogborn gets the cookies he distributes them to all of his men. By sending the cookies it gives the men and women who are over there the feeling that they are being supported, and people are thinking of them.”

For more features, read the Dec. 4 article, Featured app: RETRY.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_chloemueller.

By |2014-12-05T00:00:00+00:00December 5th, 2014|Community Events, FC Arts, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Freshmen earn Clovis Art Guild honors

Art Sally Rudolfs1Jarrod Markarian

Freshman Sally Rudolfs “Girl with Freckles,” is displayed at the Clovis Art Guild Fall Show in the Veteran’s Memorial Building in Old Town Clovis, Oct. 20-26

Art teacher Sharon Scharf entered campus artwork in the high school section of the Clovis Art Guild Fall Show in the Veteran’s Memorial Building in Old Town Clovis, Oct. 20-26 to represent Fresno Christian.

“I’m a firm believer in getting our name out there,” Scharf said. “It’s only been in the last three years that the Clovis Art Guild has opened the high school division up to schools other than Clovis schools. We want them to know that we appreciate it.

“The members of the Art Guild always remark at how professional and talented out students are,” Scharf continued. “They appreciate the young up-and-coming artists.”

Freshman Cayla Rivas was awarded third place with her watercolor, “Heartbreak.” She also earned an honorable mention for a pen/ink drawing, “Speak from your heart.”

Scharf said each semester she picks student artwork she feels reflects a quality effort and technique. Each of the student work this year is no exception.

“I saw a couple of pictures on the Internet and thought they would be a cool drawing,” Rivas said. “I saw pictures of an old speaker and a human heart from a couple of websites that I thought were kinda cool. An artist from my church did something similar with a heart and flowers intertwined so I thought I would try it.”

“I really didn’t think about going to see the pieces at the Clovis show,” Rivas continued. “It actually slipped my mind. My mom said she was proud of me so I guess that’s pretty good.”

Rivas went on to say that she got the idea for her Heartbreak watercolor on the Internet as well. I thought the girl would be pretty to paint. I’m glad it turned out.”

Freshman Sally Rudolfs also earned an honorable mention with her prismacolor, “Girl with Freckles.”

“I was looking through a social media site,” Rudolfs said, “and I saw a girl whose face stood out to me so I thought it would be really cool as an art piece. I changed some of the facial features to make it my own and altered the structure a little. I think I could have made it better so I’m a little surprised I got honorable mention.”

She has no plans to hang the drawing and actually thinks she will just stick it in a drawer for now.

The Clovis Art Guild invites art students who have entered the show were also encouraged to join the judges and artists at their meetings – where there is always a demonstration. Sydney Belmont and Michael Fu also had entries in the show.

“I enjoy talking to the art teachers from the other schools, getting idea to bring back to our school,” Scharf said. “I wish more of our students would take advantage of the Art Guild shows.

Be sure to check out freshman Cayla Rivas’ watercolor, “Heartbreak.”

The next Clovis art show will be in conjunction with the Clovis Rodeo in April. Please check out the 2014 Old West Rodeo Art Show. FC’s own Michael Fu was one of the winner’s last semester.

For more photos, visit The Feather’s photo section or check out Twin Day is underway or King dance tomorrow.

By |2014-10-28T00:00:00+00:00October 28th, 2014|Community Events, FC Arts, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Alumnus shares passion with campus, percussion

image1Jeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

Casgua, bottom left, plays the xylophone in the Fresno State Band 

Many campus graduates find that their most influential moments were made while attending FC. Former alumnus, David Casuga, discovered his passion for music and percussion during his time spent at the school.
Casuga now teaches jazz band and percussion; he is majoring in jazz performance. He began his musical career as a percussionist and has enjoyed percussion in general. His goal as a teacher is to assist the percussion program towards growth into an impressive program.

While teaching at FC, Casuga attends Fresno State. He is involved with band classes and even plays a few instruments in the Fresno State Band.

“Fresno Christian is where I discovered my passion for music,” Casuga said. “The music program gave me the opportunity to discover and explore music. I quickly found out that it was something I wanted to do for the rest of my life.”

After graduating, he wanted to give back to the program that inspired him. He enjoys being able to teach a subject that he himself is passionate about and hopes to impact his students to grow to love music as he does.

“What motivates me to teach is the thought that I could impact someone’s life through music just as I was,” Casuga said. “Because I have attended Fresno Christian since first grade, more than half my life was spent walking the halls of FC. Some of the most influential and impactful conversations I ever had were with friends and mentors of the Fresno Christian family.”

Former student percussionist, Andrew Guthrie, ’15 awaits to become better and to play with the rest of his drum team.

“This is my second year doing percussion and I really like it,” Guthrie said. “Last year was a lot more laid back and this year Casuga pushes us to college level drills. Even with the small amount of students in the class I think we can carry out the challenging drills.”

Not only did Casuga dedicate his heart towards the music program, but also towards The Feather. Throughout his high school career he served as the newspaper’s webmaster. While in the journalism lab he strived to carve his work ethic into perfection.

“Within the confines of the journalism lab is where I discovered my work ethic, to strive for perfection and my love of winning. Those are two things that I definitely transfer into my teaching methods,” Casuga said. “I can say that The Feather has helped me be an organized and responsible student.”

Emily Cox, ’19, looks at working with older classmen as a building block to success.

“The class is bigger than it was last year,” Cox said. “Casuga helps us with different techniques and challenges us a lot. I look forward to become a better percussionist this year.”
Casuga took a moment to look back and describe the unique ways that his school community changed his life. Casuga treasures how FC offers exclusive opportunities and challenges, which differentiates it from other schools. From the students’ perspective, he saw what set FC apart.

“I knew I wanted to teach at FC because the campus is unique in so many ways,” Casuga said. “It offers specialized opportunities and offers challenges. There really isn’t anything like the Fresno Christian experience.”

Every day Casuga gives thanks that he is a part of a program that he loves. He can’t wait to see what the music program conducts in the future.

“Seeing what God can do through the students and faculty’s lives is more than words can put together,” Casuga said. “Even to have a chance to be a part of the music department is more than an opportunity or privilege but it’s a blessing and I thank God for the occasion every day. I honestly couldn’t think of a better program to associate myself with then one as truly amazing as this.”

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather. This writer can be reached via Twitter @jennypenny8835.

For more features, read the Sept. 23 article, Guest speaker tells story, delivers powerful message.

By |2014-10-01T00:00:00+00:00October 1st, 2014|Academics, Alumni, FC Arts, Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Senior reflection: Fries appreciates support, adviser

SeniorTyninCourtesy Tynin Fries

Senior Tynin Fries shares her appreciation for adviser Greg Stobbe in her final Feather article. She will attend Arizona State University in the fall, joining the Barrett Honors College.

After writing 100 plus articles for The Feather, there’s really only a few things left to say. Here’s everything I wished I had said during the last four years to my adviser, Greg Stobbe:

I wish I had known on the first day of school just how much you would teach me about journalism, myself and my future.

Stobbe you were the sole reason for my motivation throughout school. As I lost my favorite teachers and watched them move away, you stayed a constant encouragement. The Feather and your crazy mind kept me from breezing through high school like everyone else.

You pushed me to my limits and made me feel insane. For months I stayed up late, meeting and surpassing your expectations.

Stobbe you’re the most inspirational teacher I’ve ever had, and probably ever will have. You put four years of work into me, and I won’t let you down.

Just like my parents will see their finished product when I move away, so will you. Now that you’ve done your job, it’s time for mine.

These last four years have been grand. We visited New York, Seattle, Disneyland and San Diego. We taught classes, won awards and even met famous people. You gave me more opportunities than an average kid could dream of having.

But rather than the big things, I’ll remember the small lessons you taught me. That when I’m too stressed it’s okay to get wheeled around the room, even if I think there’s no time. New things are scary, but also very cool. And Twitter isn’t just for morons.

This next year will bring be changes for me and you. And I hope that you never lose your inspiration to inspire. There will always be a freshman, eager to learn from you. Don’t give up now because you’ll always be a teacher.

You mean more to me than any other teacher, Stobs. I can’t wait to return in a few years to make you proud of the student and person you helped create.

I love you, Stobbe. Write on!

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @TyninFries. Follow The Feather via Twitter: @thefeather. She will attend the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and Barrett, the Honors College, at Arizona State University.

For more senior reflections, read the May 20 article, Senior overcomes struggles, builds confidence.

By |2014-05-23T00:00:00+00:00May 23rd, 2014|FC Arts, Opinions, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

BREAKING: FC students earn ACSI awards

Students from throughout Northern California entered in the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) art festival. The competition was held in Sacramento Ca at Trinity Christian School, May 9.

FC was one of eight different schools entered into the competition and as FC students earn ACSI awards at he competition. Sharon Scharf, art teacher, entered 24 students to encourage the students and give them a sense of competition.

“It was mostly Northern California and the festival was held at Trinity Christian in Sacramento, May 9,” Scharf said. “I like to enter my students to give them a sense of competition, and Michael Fu received best of show for his watercolor painting of a windmill.”

Sophomore Michael Fu took best of show out of all the 10th grade entrees.

“I painted a picture of a windmill with watercolors and sharpie,” Fu said. “I was really surprised when I found out that I got best of show because it took me about five days to paint it and I put a lot of work into it.”

Sydney Belmont, ’17, entered into the competition and was honored and pleased with the recognition of her good work.

“I submitted charcoal drawing of the Eiffel Tower,” Belmont said. “It took me two weeks to complete it. I was really surpassed to get second best of show, it is a real honor.

Congratulations to the following students for winning big at the ACSI Art Festival in Sacramento on Friday:

Michael Fu – 10th grade best of Show
Shannon Martens – 11th grade second best of show
Sydney Belmont – 9th grade second best of show
Elora Hargis – 12th grade third best of show
Cayla Rivas – 8th grade third best of show

These writers can be reached via Twitter: @_sarapeterson and @gaby_siqueiros. Follow The Feather via Twitter: @thefeather.

For more news articles, read May 9 article, Campus community supports families in need

By |2014-05-12T00:00:00+00:00May 12th, 2014|FC Arts, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Drama performance requires dedication from students

Bye-Bye Birdie was originally inspired by Michael Stewarts' novel, Lets go steady. The production hit Broadway in 1960. Emily Ladd

Bye-Bye Birdie was originally inspired by Michael Stewarts’ novel, Lets go steady. The production hit Broadway in 1960.

Drama class to perform Bye-Bye Birdie

This year the FC drama department has embarked upon a whole new genre, musicals. Drama students are scheduled to perform Bye-Bye Birdie at Ground Zero, March 6-8. As the date of the event draws ever near, the cast prepares to give a stunning performance.

Bye-Bye Birdie was originally inspired by Michael Stewarts‘ novel, Lets go steady. The production hit Broadway in 1960. It is the story of a fictional American pop- star, Conrad Birdie, who was drafted into the war.

Birdie?s manager and song writer, Alfred Peterson, arranged one last publicity stunt in order to promote Birdie?s last song. He was to appear on the Ed Sullivan Show and give one girl from his fan club a farewell kiss.

Drama and choir director Susan Ainley has considered doing a musical for many years. She says the number of drama students this year made it possible. She choose Bye-Bye Birdie for its lovable plot and lively music.

“I have been thinking about this for a long time,” Ainley said. “When I saw I had thirty students signed up for drama this year, I knew we would do it. I love this musical, it?s fun and exciting. It has great characters that the audience will love. The music from the time period is great too”.

Alexis Kalugin, sophomore drama student, will be singing in the ensemble of this musical. She says that preparation will involve determination and hard work. However she believes that the school function will be a success and is excited to dance on stage.

“I think a challenge right now is having the energy to really get into it,” Kalugin said. “I will be in the ensemble. I?m most excited to dance in the Put on a Happy Face song.”

Due to the early deadline, and increased difficulty of the production, drama students have frequent practices and rehearsals in order to prepare themselves, including lunch, after school and weekend meetings. A choreographer has also been hired to insure that the major musical routines go smoothly.
&%picture2placement%&
Senor drama student Kyle Hudecek will be playing the role of Conrad Birdie. He looks forward to the singing and dancing numbers, although he admits that learning dance steps and full songs will take more time and dedication than that of a regular play.

“My favorite part is probably the musical numbers,” Hudecek said. “They are just lots of fun to sing, dance and act in. One of the challenges is that in addition to words and dialogue we also have to learn to sing and dance. It will take a whole lot of extra time.”

Music director Michael Ogdon and the jazz band have partnered with the drama department for the production. The jazz band will play the musical numbers and add to the authenticity of the program. The Adoration Ensemble and the Kingsmen Quartet will also be featured. They will aid in increasing the volume of the cast and harmonizing.

Ainley says she anticipates a spectacular performance from her drama students and is eager to see the Senior students try something new in their last semester of drama class. She encourages the Fc community to join the audience.

“I have complete confidence that this amazing group will put on the best show ever,” Ainley said. “I can tell that my lead characters all practiced over break, and their solos sound wonderful already. Everyone is trying to give their best, and we are having so much fun learning to dance! I am excited to watch the senior drama students perform a musical in their last semester of high school and I hope everyone comes to the performance to support the drama class.”

Tickets for this event will be available for pre-sale in February at the price of $10 and at the production for $15.

For more features, read the Jan. 10 article, Teacher continues family’s multi-generation mission work.

Follow The Feather via Twitter and Instagram: @thefeather and @thefeatheronlilne. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @skylerklee.

Choir solo sparks excitement in senior

Taylor3Feather Staff

Taylor Neufeld (left) sings her solo at the fall performance.

Student pursues passion, overcomes obstacles

Imagine being up on stage, ready to preform in front of the crowd. All eyes are on the performers now, anticipating the entire choir’s performance. One student has just joined the musical group and she has to sing a solo, despite struggling with hitting the high notes.

Taylor Neufeld, ’13, had an experience very similar to that. Neufeld joined choir because of her love for singing and for a chance to prove that she can sing.

“I always ask my dad if I have a good voice and he tells me I’m not an American Idol singer,” Neufeld said. “It makes me want to get better because I think I can prove him wrong.”

She joined choir this year since it did not fit in her schedule previously. Neufeld is an alto singer and was featured in a solo in the fall concert. According to Neufeld, she loves performing for people and making others joyful.

“I love going to the performances and seeing a smile on the audience’s face,” Neufeld said “I like making people happy.”

Neufeld struggles with hitting high notes as an alto and timing her breaths correctly. Though her obstacles have never caused her problems in performances, being in choir has helped her learn how to hit the higher notes.

According to fellow alto choir member Gillian Rea, ’16, she believes that all of the alto section struggles with self-confidence.

“The altos are more insecure, I think, about singing,” Rea said. “It’s a weird part to sing because it’s really close to the tenor’s part.”

Neufeld was one of the soloists chosen for the fall concert. While some students may have felt anxious, she was filled with excitement.

“I was really excited to be one of the solo acts,” Neufeld said. “It was really cool to sing a solo for my first year of choir in the first performance. Mr. Ogdon picked me and two other people for the song, so it was cool to sing. I didn’t really feel nervous, just excited.”

As a senior on campus, she loves getting to know her other class mates and is eager for the semester to end. Neufeld did not expect to experience ‘senioritis’ but finds herself tired of the daily schedule and is excited for a break from school.

“I’m really excited to be a senior but part of me just wants to be done with it,” Neufeld said. “The best part of it though is getting the special privileges seniors get.”

Along with love for singing, Neufeld knows American Sign Language (ASL). She began learning ASL in sixth grade and has some experience with performances because of it.

“In the performing arts group, instead of singing the song we would sign them,” Neufeld said. “I guess that’s one of my talents.”

Music director Michael Ogdon enjoys having Neufeld in his class and the opportunity for Neufeld to sing with the other choir members.

“Taylor is new to the choir after a long time away from music fun,” Ogdon said. “Her schedule finally let her jump back into the thick of it with eighty others.”

To read more about the Fall Choir concert, read the Oct. 17 article Choral department to hold fall concert.

For more features, read the Dec. 14 article, Most wonderful time: Join the discussion, 2012 (VIDEO).

Follow The Feather via Twitter and Instagram: @thefeather and @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @ejLadd

By |2012-12-18T00:00:00+00:00December 18th, 2012|FC Arts, Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Students, teacher observe cats for art class (VIDEO)

CatHaven1Ashley Erickson

Anderson founded the Cat Haven in 1993 with the hope of educating his visitors about endangered cat species because his passion was peaked in seventh grade, according to the website.

Cat Haven provides real life experiences for class

Imagine watching a mountain lion, prowling in it’s habitat, so close you could almost touch it. This summer a group of students had an experience similar to this at Project Survival’s Cat Haven in the Sierra Mountain foothills near Dunlap.

Home economics and art teacher Sharon Scharf invited alumni Alexandra Barisic, Becky Barisic, Barisic’s mom, and seniors Ashley Erickson, Kevin Thao, Juan Ruelas and Katie Barisic to Project Survival’s Cat Haven to snap photos of the wild cats, June 7.

Scharf’s friend Wendy Debbas is involved in the Cat Haven’s activities. Debbas has lead safaris in Africa and helps support a orphanage in Kenya. Scharf traveled to Debbas’ house and snapped pictures of two 23-week old jaguar cubs.

“I have since been able to go to Wendy’s house to take photos of two jaguar cubs she was raising until they were old enough to be placed in the Cat Haven,” Scharf said. “They were 12 weeks old at the time. She kept them in a bathroom when they were not romping in the backyard with her dog. She also has a bobcat, who I photographed, who was found in an abandoned washing machine with her sister; their mom had been killed.”

Scharf saw the photos Debbas took of the different wild cats protected at the Cat Haven and wanted her students to be able to photograph the same cats.

“They [/fusion_builder_column]

[the art students] can’t draw from a published photograph and enter it in a contest,” Scharf said. “They have to draw from their own photos. Drawing from a published photo is plagiarism.”

The group met at Blossom Trail Cafe and then left for the Cat Haven. When they arrived they received an introduction and a tour.

“We were given an excellent introduction by the director, Dale Anderson.” Scharf said. “Then Jolein, a docent, gave us about a two hour tour. We learned a great deal more than we bargained for- about conservation, the mission of the Cat Haven; to raise funds to educate the people in Kenya where the endangered cats live, how to coexist with them and to not kill them.”

“We learned a great deal more than we bargained for- about conservation, the mission of the Cat Haven; to raise funds to educate the people in Kenya where the endangered cats live, how to coexist with them and to not kill them.” –Sharon Scharf, FC art teacher

Anderson founded the Cat Haven in 1993 with the hope of educating his visitors about endangered cat species because his passion was peaked in seventh grade, according to the website.

“I wanted a different way to conserve wild cat’s lives,” said Anderson. “I also wanted to get people interested in helping the cats. In the seventh grade a gentleman brought a mountain lion to my class. I do not remember the name of the gentleman but I do remember the cat’s name: Sam.”

As he got older he decided he wanted a unique way to help different species of wild cats. He hoped it would teach others about the endangered species and encourage them to help.

Erickson was one of the many vistors who learned more then they would have thought while attending the Cat Haven’s tours.

“We got a guided tour of the entire facility and spent a lot of time taking pictures of the different cats,” Erickson said. “We learned about their different personalities, how they would normally look and how many were left in the wild. It was really interesting. I had never seen those animals except on TV, so it was unique to see them so close.”

Katie and Erickson were the first students Scharf invited on the trip because of their experience with this particular kind of art.

“Ashley Erickson and Katie Barsic have both done artwork using large cat photos, so those are the two students I started with,” Scharf said. “When [Greg] Stobbe found out, he wanted Juan Ruelas to go take photos and videograph the event. Kevin Thao joined him, along with Katie’s mom and her sister.”

The group was guided from habitat to habitat, learning about each cat as they were able to observe them in a habitat very similar to their natural setting.

“We took a tour of the Cat Haven and saw lots of small and large cats,” Katie said. “There were two lions that were really cool. We almost touched one. They had a lot of jaguars, too.”

Fellow classmates agreed with Katie, reflecting on their experience on the haven and agreeing that others should visit the haven.

“I was really surprised that there were lions like that about an hour away from Fresno,” Ruelas said. “It’s awesome, it’s a unique experience and it’s something you will enjoy and not regret, unless you hate lions and cats.”

Traveling to the Cat Haven to see the cats is not the only option. The sanctuary takes its smaller cats to public events such as the Madera Fair or to other schools. The cats have also been on the TV program, The Tonight Show, and spent time with different celebrities.

Scharf would like to work with the Cat Haven to arrange a day when they could bring some of the smaller cats on campus, as the haven has not yet been presented to FC.

“I feel it would be a great opportunity for our student body to hear the presentation the Cat Haven gives to schools,” Scharf said. “Bringing one of their cheetahs and talking about the conservation program they have. I’m presently trying to talk to the right people to get this to happen.”

For more information on the Cat Haven, visit their website or make the drive to 38257 E. Kings Canyon Rd.
Dunlap, CA. 93621. The entrance fees are $9 for adults and $6 for children 6-12. Seniors are $7.50. Visitors can also contact them via email or by phone at 559.338.3216.

For more information on the field trip, email Scharf.

For more features, read the Sept. 11 article, Seniors bond through activities, strengthen relationships.

Follow The Feather via Twitter and Instagram: @thefeather and @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @ejLadd

By |2012-09-13T00:00:00+00:00September 13th, 2012|FC Arts, FC Events, Features, Uncategorized|1 Comment

CSPA recognizes The Feather with a Crown

Featherstaff200910SmFC file photo

The Feather Online is poised to receive at least a Silver Crown from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association’s annual competition in March. They have already received notification of the Silver and await the competition in NYC.

After losing several seniors after the 2008-2009 school year, the staff of The Feather Online has continued to compete on a national level, winning at least an Online Silver Crown from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association (CSPA), Feb. 17.

The Crown recognizes The Feather’s online coverage during the fall of 2009, ranging from excellence in page design to article quality to multimedia features.

The Feather Online was one of 27 online newspapers to be named a finalist, making them automatically a Silver winner, and eligible for a Gold Crown; the winners of which will be announced at Columbia University in March. Several Feather staffers will travel to New York to receive the award and attend a three-day CSPA conference, March 17-19.

Senior editor Austin Ward, ’11, says the honor of the award is even more meaningful considering the staff has 10 fewer members from last year’s high of 40.

“With so many new staffers this year, qualifying for a Crown award underscores the strong foundation that the paper has established for itself over the years,” Ward said. “It pleases me to see the continuing passion and drive of the staff that gets us to where we are today.”

For sophomore David Casuga, the Crown award marks the first competition in which The Feather has been recognized during his tenure as webmaster. He is excited that the CSPA recognizes The Feather with Crown.

“This award means that all the stress and antagonizing I got and all the bad stuff was absolutely worth it; that as a first-year webmaster, I won a Crown,” Casuga said. “I thought making the new features was really fun, but at the same time it was difficult to juggle focusing on journalism and then transition to something like math.”

Despite the jubilation of many staff members, some newbies are only being introduced to the world of competitive scholastic journalism through the award.

“I didn’t really know about the competition because I’m new to journalism and I’m never been involved in the newspaper,” freshman staffer Allie Frea said. “I don’t think about the competition [/fusion_builder_column]

[both Crown and the NSPA Pacemaker] every time I work, but when I am reminded, it does make me work faster.”

For more information about The Feather and its staff, read the Dec. 4, 2009 article, The Feather adds new multimedia features or the Jan. 21 article, Classroom antics, journalism occupy veteran teacher. Or, e-mail adviser Greg Stobbe.

By |2010-02-18T00:00:00+00:00February 18th, 2010|Community Events, FC Arts, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Where credit is due

PacemakerWinnersFeather file photo

Editors Mary Kneefel, Andrew Rurik, Jennifer Sherfield and adviser Greg Stobbe pause after The Feather Online won the NSPA Pacemaker in April 2008.

“There’s no ‘I’ in team.”

That old adage is ubiquitous, inescapable in every walk of life. It doesn’t want to go away. Everywhere I turn, there is some situation that the phrase can apply to. As true as this is for sports teams, it is also true for journalism staffs.

I entered into this year way over my head. Mr. (Greg) Stobbe had asked me the year before to be the webmaster to give The Feather Online a simple aesthetic makeover. However, after a few summer meetings, that ‘simple little makeover’ turned into starting from the ground up.

The previous webmaster (Matthew Shattuck, ’07) was truly a master of the web. I, on the other hand, was essentially learning (or re-learning, as I did have some previous experience) as I went. This made for some interesting days and weeks as the designing process of The Feather began.

So about a month passes, and there have been setbacks upon setbacks. We are now into the first part of October, hoping to go live in December, and I am in way over my head. Thus begins the credit giving part: David Martens, the IT director, stepped alongside me and helped me out immensely.

I do not believe that The Feather Online would operate anywhere as close to as smoothly as it does now without Martens’ help. He took the projects that were way out of my knowledge base and broke them down into smaller pieces, giving me projects I could handle and helping me when I got stuck.

However, even more credit remains to be doled out. The Feather staff went down to Anaheim, April 17-19, to win an Online Pacemaker award from the NSPA. That is no small feat. As much praise as we as a staff have received, I would like to distribute a little more.

To all of our editors: You guys are phenomenal. As six of the eight of you graduate, let me just say what an honor and privilege it was to work with you these past two years.

All the writers: You all write a lot more articles than I do, and although the Pacemaker is awarded to the online newspaper, the article content is probably 75% or more of what we won on, so keep up the amazing work.

And finally, to Stobbe: Thank you for pushing me this year, for constantly showing me ways to improve, taking me to what I think is my limit and then showing me that there’s more, for driving me towards excellence in this endeavor and not being short on both constructive criticism or compliments.

There is no ‘I’ in team. Not one person won us our Pacemaker. Thirty-three of us students banded together for the long haul and came out on top as a team. Where credit is due?

And to us our team–we received the credit; we were due.

By |2008-06-03T00:00:00+00:00June 3rd, 2008|FC Arts, Opinions, The Feather, Uncategorized|3 Comments

Editors maintain Feather excellence, win 2nd Pacemaker

ChampionsScott Rurik, Guest photographer

Co-editor-in-chiefs Mary Kneefel and Jennifer Sherfeld pose with adviser Greg Stobbe after The Feather wins its second Pacemaker.

“I’m giving you this position, I didn’t have to, so I can take it away whenever I want,” Feather adviser Greg Stobbe told her. With beginnings like that, how could brand new Editor-in-chief Mary Kneefel go wrong?

After Brianna Stobbe, ’06, led the Feather to their first National Scholastic Press Association (NSPA) Online Pacemaker in 2006, adviser Stobbe felt ready to pass the role on to Kneefel. Her up-and-down experience in the class paid off.

When Kneefel, as a freshman, was encouraged by brother Alec, ’05 , to join publications, she had doubts about the class.

“My brother told him (Stobbe) I would join, which I thought was a mean joke, because I hated writing,” Kneefel, ’08, said. “I thought I was a terrible writer and did not know what to expect.”

From beginnings as a freshman reporter, Kneefel was forced to overcome her inhibitions to get the perfect quote, opening or transition.

“I hated talking to upperclassmen, because I was so shy,” Kneefel said. “My very first article was about varsity volleyball and had to interview several members of the team. It took a couple years, to be comfortable while approaching students for an interview.”

Out of the fear of braving Stobbe’s scrunity alone, Kneefel recruited friends Michelle and Jennifer Rose, ’08, other four-year journalism students.

“My first impression of journalism was that it wasn’t going to be easy,” Michelle said. “Mary was easily a better writer than I was and she encouraged me to stay with it.”

After finishing her freshman year still not sure about journalism, Kneefel made the decision to come back. Experience for college and a supportive class atmosphere motivated her to return. After finishing her sophomore year, Stobbe felt he was ready to pass the torch.

“After her first two years, I saw the same drive and passion that I saw in previous editors and the will to make the paper a big part of her life,” Stobbe said. “She was willing to take my criticism and was not satisfied to win (a Pacemaker) as a reporter. Mary overcame her personal shortcomings out of sheer determination by the end of her sophomore year. She was ready to become the Editor-in-chief.”

The transition from quiet staff writer to head of the paper gave Kneefel a new sense of responsibility, to the Feather and to Stobbe.

“I felt he saw something in me, no other teacher had,” Kneefel said. “He believed in me more than anyone else did. I really wanted to meet his expectations and prove I could do it.”

Junior Kneefel took on the Editor-in-chief role the year after winning a national award as a writer. After about a month and a half of school, she was joined by Jennifer Sherfield, ’08, to help sift through the dozens of articles and compile editorials, among other tasks.

“I joined journalism because I didn’t have an elective and I really wanted to go to New York,” Sherfield said. “Little did I know it would turn into a passion. I love all the close relationships I’ve formed with the staff.”

After winning a national Pacemaker in 2006, The Feather staff lost 18 seniors, and started almost from scratch with juniors Kneefel and Sherfield to head the class.

“Jenn’s zeal for excellence earned her a spot as senior editor,” Stobbe said. “She earned my respect a month into her first year in publications and she complimented Mary’s tenacity. They made a great team.”

Kneefel and Sherfield sacrificed lunches, after school and vacation time to keep the paper running.

“Mary and I became so became close through working so many hours together,” Sherfield said. “Last year we edited 10 articles the day before we left for New York, which took eight hours, so a new article could go up every day.”

While beginning Editor-in-chief duties, Kneefel appreciated having a partner to share the volume of work and responsibility.

“It helped to have someone to carry the load,” Kneefel said. “We were friends already because of tennis, but we became so much closer. Even though she was only in journalism for one year, before becoming an editor, I trusted her to share responsibilities; I don’t know what I would have done with Jenn.”

After being nominated for the national Pacemaker in 2007, Kneefel and Sherfield were joined by several new editors and they strived to reprise their 2006 success.

After years of practice and three months of constant writing and editing, Kneefel and Sherfield were rewarded by winning another NSPA Pacemaker, in Anaheim on April 19.

“Winning the 2nd Pacemaker meant so much more to me as an editor,” Kneefel said. “I never wanted anything more in my life.”

After only two years on The Feather, Sherfield still feels the repercussions of her efforts.

“I love knowing that I’ve been a part of something bigger than just our campus. It was so rewarding when we got national recognition for the Pacemaker. I know I’ll take what I’ve learned working on The Feather with me for the rest of my life.”

Sherfield will attend Fresno Pacific University next fall with a major in liberal studies.

Kneefel plans to study at La Sierra University in Riverside receiving a degree in clinical laboratory science and then Loma Linda University Adventist Health Sciences Center, to specialize in radiology.

“Even though I’m not going to be a journalist, The Feather has helped me prepare in so many ways,” Kneefel said. “It helped in communicating with others and writing English papers. It has helped me reach my potential; I am a different person because of this class.”

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.

By |2008-05-07T00:00:00+00:00May 7th, 2008|FC Arts, Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Feather print edition wins SJVSPA Sweepstakes

SweepstakesWinner2008BestSmFC file photo

For the first time in campus history, The Feather is the Sweepstakes winner at the San Joaquin Valley Scholastic Press Association’s (SJVSPA) annual publications competition at Fresno State, March 1.

Campus paper best high school paper from Bakersfield to Lodi

For the first time in campus history, the Feather print edition was named the Sweepstakes winner of the San Joaquin Valley Scholastic Press Association’s (SJVSPA) annual publications competition, March 1, 2008.

“With publications competitions becoming more competitive, it’s hard to imagine a small high school competing against the large school programs,” Greg Stobbe, adviser, said. “But on this day, The Feather staff proved that size does not always matter.”

The Mass Communication and Journalism Departments at California State University, Fresno, annually sponsor the event. The contest consisted of three components: mail-in competition, critique of fall semester’s newspapers and on-the-spot contests.

“I am very excited that we won Sweepstakes; it’s like we were named grand champions,” senior Ryan Martens, Layout and Design editor, said, “but I really was disappointed because we didn’t get All-Valley. Last year we won the award without putting an emphasis on it and so I kind of expected it. But at the same time our December copy did not get proofed and that really worried me.”

Fifteen schools and 145 students participated in the workshops and competition. The Fresno State competition began in 1931 and the previous winners alternated between five other campuses: Golden West High, Tokay High, Bear Creek High, Bullard High and Stagg High.

“It was so gratifying to win the competition,” Alyssa Boss, ’10, said. “It seems for each staff member that Stobbe pushes them harder than everyone else, but we really appreciate him doing so. I entered the features competition and ended up winning third place.”

I can’t even describe how happy I was when Rice announced we won Sweepstakes, especially for the first time in campus history. I’m glad our staff could win it for Stobbe, after all these years. It’s reassuring go into the final portion of the Pacemaker competition, having the hardcopy win, when we spend the majority of our time working on the online edition. — Editor-in-chief Mary Kneefel

Although the staff only received two awards in the first 20 minutes of the presentation, the second half honored nine other reporters. Gary Rice, Executive Director of the SJVSPA and journalism professor, presented senior Mary Kneefel, Editor-in-chief, with the three-foot trophy after he announced The Feather wins SJVSPA Sweepstakes.

“I can’t even describe how happy I was when Rice announced we won Sweepstakes, especially for the first time in campus history,” Kneefel said. “I’m glad our staff could win it for Stobbe, after all these years. It’s reassuring go into the final portion of the Pacemaker competition, having the hardcopy win, when we spend the majority of our time working on the online edition.”

For four of the last five years, the Feather has won the SJVSPA Small Schools Division and named an All-Valley Newspaper. This campus earned the distinction of Sweepstakes winner, while beating all schools, regardless of size or division, between Stockton and Bakersfield.

The staff’s score of 121 narrowly beat out Golden West by one point and last year’s winner, Stagg High, by nine points.

Frustration leads to Sweepstakes win

This campus came closest to a Sweepstakes win in 2000, but fell a few points shy. This year, The Feather was in a similar situation, but experienced the opposite outcome due to sophomore Sydney Ray’s first place rookie feature award.

“While trying to e-mail my paper in for judgment, the computer had a glitch and my saved paper was completely erased,” Ray said. “By this time I was in tears, but the judge offered me a chance to rewrite the article during lunch. At first I refused, but the idea of being a quitter convinced me to go ahead and redo the assignment.”

“I threw together the quotes, transitions and stories from what I could remember in 30 minutes,” Ray said. “Then I went home, feeling as though I had no chance of winning. But, a few hours later I received a call from Stobbe saying that I won first place in the Rookie Features division. Thankfully my friends and Stobbe encouraged me to rewrite it.”

Stobbe believes Ray’s decision to persevere compensated for the past shortcomings to clinch first place overall.

“For me, I am most proud of those students who competed in the on-the-spot contests,” Stobbe said. “It was there that they showed how far they have advanced during the school year. The Feather had 11 individual winners and it was so gratifying to watch them succeed under pressure.”

“I am so proud of the editors of this paper,” Stobbe said. “Mary and Jenn (Sherfield, ’08, Senior editor) work tirelessly to generate ideas, train staff and provide leadership. The 2007-08 staff is the real deal.”

The Feather staff continues to pursue excellence in high school journalism as one of the top 10 finalists for the Pacemaker competition sponsored by the National Scholastic Press Association. The winners will be announced, April 19.

Editors honored with SJVSPA All Valley honor

sm-EditorsHonoredBrittany Stobbe

After months of editing and dedication to the campus newspaper, The Feather, senior hard copy editor-in-chief, Gary Darakjian, center, and senior online editor-in-chief, Brianna Stobbe, right, received first place in the Small Schools Division at the SJVSPA competition at Fresno State, March 4.

In now its 60th year, the San Joaquin Valley Scholastic Press Association (SJVSPA) invites junior and senior high media and communication students from Lodi to Bakersfield to compete in its annual competition sponsored by the School of Mass Media and Journalism at Fresno State University, March 4, 2006.

After months of editing and dedication to the campus newspaper, The Feather, senior hard copy editor-in-chief, Gary Darakjian, center, and senior online editor-in-chief, Brianna Stobbe, right, received first place and a SJVSPA All Valley honor newspaper award in the Small Schools Division at the SJVSPA competition at FSU on March 4.

This is the second year in a row The Feather was awarded this honor. Additionally the online version of the paper is currently being judged by the National Scholastic Press Association in its two-month competition. Results of this contest will be made available in April.

Darakjian, who has been on staff for three years, also received first place in the on-the-spot lay-out and design competition. The on-the-spot competitions were open to students from all divisions. Other onsite winners were seniors Kassy Batesole and editor Spenser Koleen. Both writers received honorable mention in on-the-spot contests: Batesole for a sports article and Koleen for an editorial.

Feather back online after Highwired.com’s demise

Students pound their mouses into their mouse pads as they hopelessly search for the location of the school’s newspaper website. Little do they know that behind the scenes, the journalism staff, along with technology director, Dave Martens, have worked tirelessly to produce a better website. The Feather back online is the staff’goal and its at www.thefeather.com.

“I like the new website because we have an easy URL,” David Pohl, ’03, staff writer, said. “I hated typing all those stupid backslashes and meaningless letters.”

Highwired.com, The Feather’s old Internet provider folded due to lack of funds and journalism was forced to produce a website from scratch.

“When Highwired went down in August, I at first was depressed thinking that a new website would be almost impossible,” journalism adviser Greg Stobbe said. “However, despite this great loss, we had the opportunity to create something better. Mr. (David) Martens and I sat down with superintendent (Tim) Wilkins and we hammered out the general concept that turned into what you see today.”

Highwired gave space to high schools to show their newspaper, classrooms, and sports. It also housed The Feather for three years and still holds its archives under the name www.highschooljournalism.org. This site also displays 350 newspapers including a link to The Feather. With Highwired’s demise, the American Society of Newspaper Editors has also taken over the rights of Higwired to follow suit and display high school newspapers at www.asne.com.

“This new website has jubilated me beyond perceivable limits, and I find myself to be the quintessence of excitement,” Brad Hart, ’03, editor-in-chief, said. “Every time I type a letter, my finger tips tingle knowing it will appear on our new website. I feel as if rays of sunshine burst from my soul positively affecting students around me. I have poured my blood and sweat into this paper and finally it is going somewhere.”

For more information on The Feather, please go to www.theFeather.com and e-mail the staff or use www.FresnoChristian.com. Students may also call the high school office at 297-9464 and leave a message on adviser Stobbe’s answering service at 297-9464, ext. 151.

Duct tape may be banned

In a game of trust, Paul Kinnear, ’06, became a taped decoration on Building 6 on Aug. 27, 2001, courtesty of drama class. When adviser Tom McEntee suggested the class tape a human being to a wall, the students jumped at the opportunity “to do” rather than say, “we couldn’t.”

After taping him to the wall and left in the sun to bake, Kinnear was heard calling, “Help me,” from a classroom on the second floor. The drama class had all abandoned him hanging there after lunch and gone to class.

“It was very hot and sticky,” Kinnear said. “I smelled like duct tape for a week. My clothes had to be burned.”

McEntee later added that “duct tape may be banned after this incident.”

 

By |2001-09-05T00:00:00+00:00September 5th, 2001|FC Arts, FC Events, Photos, Uncategorized|0 Comments