Fresno State hosts Armenian Centennial Concert

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Dance Medley of Armenian Dances began with male dancers with Armenian cultural clothing and later introduced the female dancers onto the stage.

Evening of dance, music in memory of Armenian genocide

As 2015 marks the 100th year of the Armenian Genocide, various of events are planned to commemorate this tragedy. One of which is the Armenian Genocide Centennial Concert on March 8 at Fresno State.

This unique event gather the dancing groups Hamazkayin Niari Dance Ensemble, The Chookasian Armenian Concert Ensemble along with hundreds of descendants of survivors from the Armenian Genocide. The commemoration was separated to several parts which included two speeches celebrating the survival from the hand of the Ottoman Empire.

The Armenian Centennial Concert included ensemble and dancing groups as they performed several different songs represent various parts of the Armenian history. From the male dances to impress females to the wedding dance, from the escape of the Turkish to the desperation of the existence of God, and the age-old song written by Harutyun Syatian in 18th centuries to a brand new song written in 21st centuries encouraging the young generation, the concert has shown numerous cultures of the Armenian.

Founders of the Chookasian Armenian Concert Ensemble, John and Barbara Chookasian started the program in 1994. With the goal to perform traditional yet rarely heard music, John and Barbara along with six other multi-award artists performed over 15 songs in the concert. Many of the performances were folkloric which were played in several different timeline.

Few of the performances stood out the most were “Khossek Hayastani Lerner”–Speak of the Armenian mountains, “Garno Sharjoum”–The Call (to arms) has sounded, and the “Armenian Folk Song Medley”.

Khosseck Hayastani Lerner, song sang by Barbara, is a blue folkloric described the separation of the young, the family and the mother who was forced to leave her child and home. Part of the lyrics describes an Armenian mother desperately wanting to know the news of her homeland and the miserable sadness of her losing her son. Throughout the song, words “Ararat” was mention multiple times, which is the name of the mountain where the song was written. Armenian had been living on the mountain for generation, but during the genocide, Turkish took over the mountain along with many others.

The Armenian Centennial Concert is a great success. Although myself do not relate to any Armenian, I could definintely feel the struggles and all the desperation of the Armenian. As a person who enjoy art and music, I can not express the emotion on many of the elders faces when the first song was sang. It was so emotional and so comforting at the same time. It seems like after hundred of years of suppressing anger and lost of family is now first being relief. –Junior Feather staffer Michael Fu

Garno Sharjoum is a nationalistic song of the historic uprising in Province of Erzrum during the Armenian Genocide. Even though facing with great treats and risking their own lives fought against Turkish, many of the Armenian got united and stood against the rival power. This song provided a powerful message uplift the hearts of many Armenian people and given them strength to endure through the Genocide.

One of the notable song performed by Hayka Nalbandyan with saz, a traditional Armenian double-bodied lute. Played like a guitar, lute is also called bazouk. The instrument can cover large range of area. The song was origin from the folk dance. This medley is quick yet simple allowed many quickly immerse into the music.

Beside performing music and singing, the concert also invited dance group from L.A., Hamazkayin Valley Chapter Niari Dance Group was found in 2000 with 27 dancers, it now has over hundred of dancers. From aged of 5 to 28 years old, over 30 dancers participate in the centennial concert here at Fresno State.

Dance Medley of Armenian Dances performed by many of the dancers was a joyful performance. Four male dancers started the dance with Armenian cultural clothing and later introduced the female dancers onto the stage. With quick beat and colorful costumes, they quickly bring the audience to a joyful world.

Oor Aeyir Asdvadz traslate to “Where Were You O’ God?” is also performed by the Hamazkayin dance group. Song wrote by Mesdjian. This is a song of Armenian crying to God asking of where is He. The performance was slow and probably the most broken-hearted to both audiences and all survivors. Wearing purple dresses, a powerful message has sent to many of the outsider. Several eyes were fill with tears.

The concert is a great success. Although myself does not relate to any Armenian, I could definitely feel the struggles and all the desperation of the Armenian. As a person who enjoy art and music, I can not express the emotion on many of the elders faces when the first song was sang. It was so emotional and so comforting at the same time. It seems like after hundred of years of suppressing anger and lost of family is now first being relief.

Outside of the CSUF Satellite Student Union, a genocide monument is currently building right now and will be complete on April 24. Students and families are all welcome to the ceremony.

For more information about Armenian Genocide article and picture check out Armenian Centennial Genocide article in photo section.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @fmichael_0501.

By |2015-03-27T00:00:00-07:00March 27th, 2015|Community Events, Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Gazebo Gardens hosts food truck showcase

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Gazebo Gardens is on the corner of Shields and Palm avenues in Fresno; host a food truck showcase on Friday and Saturday nights.

Every Friday and Saturday, authentic food trucks from all over Fresno come to Gazebo Gardens to share tasty dishes and drinks with the people of Fresno. Each weekend different trucks with a variety of foods are lined up in the gardens under the twinkly lights.

Gazebo Gardens hosts food truck showcase and starts from 5 p.m. and goes to 9 p.m. every Friday and Saturday night. Different trucks arrive each weekend providing an assortment of food. To add the charm of the night, bands come together and perform genres of smooth jazz or R&B.

Once arriving at the entrance, I already heard faint sounds of welcoming music. The sun had set and the glowing lights began to flicker on. The trucks were ready and lines of hungry stomachs were forming.

On this night, trucks from Dusty Buns Bistro, Sno Cafe, Mattie’s Wood Fired Pizza, Tako BBQ, El Premio Mayor, P&R Fusion and Cowboy Shaman served varieties of unique American, Mexican, Korean and Peruvian-American food.

The first item that I chose were tacos from P&R Fusion (Peruvian-American). They tasted fresh and very flavorful for the small tacos that they were; the order came with two tacos for $3. This was a great deal considering that I wanted to try more food from other trucks.

The next food choice that I picked was from Cowboy Shaman (Chinese Food), and it was a meal that consisted of 3 pot stickers and 3 egg rolls with additional sauces for $8. The pot stickers were more crispy than others that I have had at other restaurants making it super delicious. The sauces that came along with it were a perfect match of sweet and salty.

For dessert I chose to try a snow cone in “Georgia Sunset” from Sno Cafe. The “Georgia Sunset” tasted of peaches and cream and was very tasty. The snow cone was a refreshing finish to the warm night at the gardens.

The food was prepared quickly and served hot so the wait was not that long. Towards 8 p.m. more people arrived making the wait for the snow cone 10 minutes. Overall the service and presentation of food was excellent.

While enjoying the food, locales from around Fresno chatted under the stars and listened to the music brought by the band. Near the end of the night, Gazebo Gardens was packed with people from all ages, enjoying the food and tunes.

The setting was laid back and relaxing, with the twinkling lights and aroma of roses surrounding; it was peaceful. The next time you find yourself open on Friday or Saturday, check out Gazebo Gardens for flavorful varieties of food.

Check out the Gazebo Gardens website for upcoming events and line up of food.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @jennypenny.

For more reviews, read the March 17 article, Authentic Italian food offers traditional dining options.

By |2015-03-25T00:00:00-07:00March 25th, 2015|Community Events, Food, Uncategorized|0 Comments

FC hits NY: Day 4 (SLIDESHOW)

DSC_7293Ryan King, Photographer

With two days of touring behind them, Feather editors and adviser Greg Stobbe pose in from of the Freedom Tower in NYC before they visit the 9-11 Memorial Museum, March 19.

With two full days in New York under their belts, the editors prepared themselves for their third full day in the city. One more day and the team will spend the rest of the week at Columbia University for the Columbia Scholastic Press Association’s 91st convention.

Warm clothes were strongly suggested and the group departed from the hotel at 9:30 a.m to take the subway as FC hits NY and visit the 9/11 Memorial.

The 9-11 Memorial has been in the stages of construction since 2007 and is still being added to. The highlight of the site was the museum dedicated to honoring those who lost their lives and their loved ones.

After the memorial, the editors made their way down Wall Street and popped in to the Trinity Church. Following the cathedral the group made their way to Battery Park where they watched street dancers perform and viewed the Statue of Liberty from afar.

From there, the girls made their way back to Times Square to shop freely and the boys took a trip to Grand Central Station before returning back to Times Square to shop.

The group met up at 7:45 p.m. to make their way to the 8 p.m. Broadway showing of An American in Paris and ate a late dinner at TGI Fridays.

First timer in New York City, Trevor Beal, shares his impressions of the city along with his favorite aspects of the trip.

“This is my first time ever being in NYC,” Beal said, “I have been to other big cities before but none compare to NYC, Grand Central Station and Wall Street have been my favorite parts of the trip so far, along with the Phantom of the Opera play and 911 Memorial Museum.”

Chloe Mueller, Editor-in-Chief, says she will enjoy giving a session at the 91st CSPA Journalism Convention at Columbia University.

“This year gave me a new look on the trip because we are teaching sessions at Columbia University,” Mueller said. “But the sightseeing is still fun. I loved the 9/11 Memorial.”

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @gaby_siqueros.

For more news, read the March 18 article, FC hits NY: Day 2 (SLIDESHOW, VIDEO).

Emily Krieghoff blood drive, March 20

Student leadership is taking a more active role in promoting student involvement throughout this school year. Please return to read about how FC students are actively learning, serving and promoting teen events on and off campus in this weekly article series.

IMG_6729FC file photo

After alumna Emily Krieghoff, ’09, was injured in an auto accident, student leadership is organizing a blood drive, March 20.

Night of the Stars (NOTS) is in two weeks, March 28, tickets are still on sale and will be sold up to the day of the event. Get your NOTS tickets soon to get a good table seat while you can!

Moving onto the next event put on by student leadership: Sadies. The event will be held on April 25 and the location is yet to be announced. The annual event is only three weeks after NOTS, so it is recommended that girls begin asking their dates out soon.

Student leadership has began talking about Sadies in class and is working on making event decisions. Although making big decisions for the event can be a stressful task, the students continue to keep the wants and needs of the entire student body in mind.

In planning activities, the goal of leadership is to include everyone in the school and consider everyone’s opinion. Even though not everyone will like the class decision, leadership still puts a lot of extra time and effort into the considerations of others.

On Friday, March 20, The California Blood Bank will be coming to FC from 1p.m. to 5 p.m. to get blood donations for Emily Krieghoff, ’09, a former FC student who was critically hurt in a car accident. Come out and show your support for the Emily Krieghoff blood drive, March 20.

Students who are 16 years of age must have parents’ permission to donate blood. However, students older than 16 years are able to come donate without parental permission. All students, regardless of age, must sign a waiver.

At the end of May, student leadership will be having ASB elections. Any student in the student body is able to run for an ASB position. It is not a requirement that students are members of leadership the year before running. Start thinking about running and your own personal goals for the school.

Look at future leadership articles to see what the ASB positions will do and require.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @sbbelmont98, Email: sbbelmont@gmail.com.

For more news, read the March 17 article, FC hits NY: Day 2.

By |2015-03-18T00:00:00-07:00March 18th, 2015|Alumni, Community Events, FC Events, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

FC hits NY: Day 2 (SLIDESHOW, VIDEO)

GroupHotelDay2Greg Stobbe, adviser

While the group still needs to tighten up sessions for the CSPA convention, Feather editors gather in the lobby of Hotel Edison before they embark on a day of touring Manhattan, March 17.

The Feather editors started their first day of tourism in New York City on the holy day for the Irish: St. Patty’s Day, March 17. With a couple of days dedicated to checking out the Big Apple before attending and speaking at the 91st annual Columbia Scholastic Press Association’s (CSPA) convention, today FC hits NY.

Attempting to avoid a sea of green chaos, adviser Greg Stobbe suggested the team spend most of their day in Little Italy and Soho, eating and shopping. The staff departed Hotel Edison at 8:15 a.m. and made their way to the nearest subway station before the parades and celebrators crowded Times Square.

Not eating before their departure, the staff insisted that the first thing they do in Little Italy was get breakfast before treading onward to shopping. Heading the cries of his people, Stobbe led his staff to Ferrara: an Italian bakery and cafe with a wide range of different kinds of food options. Though breakfast meats were available, many of the students opted for the pastries.

After finishing breakfast the female staffers abandoned their male counterparts to get an early start on their shopping, leaving the men behind in the cafe in favor of rushing to Soho and all its stores had to offer. Their shopping spree was short lived, however, as a couple of the girls fell ill and left Soho early to get back to the comfort of their hotel rooms.

Though the women were down for the count, the men endured through the elements and their check balances. Before impending bankruptcy set itself upon them, Stobbe intervened and called the men to Il Palazzo where they enjoyed an authentic Italian lunch. The boys left for the hotel at 2 p.m. and arrived at around 2:30 p.m.

Having about five hours of rest time before the first play of the New York trip, students took full advantage of this opportunity to get much needed shut eye. Many of the students stayed awake from Monday morning to Tuesday afternoon without sleep, easily achieving an “all-nighter.”

After the five-hour nap, the students woke from their dens and began preparing for the first play of many on their trip. Upon departing the hotel 7:10 p.m. everyone soon felt the nose numbing wind that New York had to offer. Racing from the subways and the streets the team eventually made their way to the first play, The King and I, which began 8 p.m. and ended at 11 p.m.

Once the play ended, hunger soon plagued the students again. They left the theatre and moved to the subways to get back to Times Square. Upon arriving, the team immediately spotted an Applebees and moved like predatory animals towards this beacon. Once they finished their food everyone departed for the hotel and arrived at 12:30 a.m.

Most of the Feather staff went to their rooms and prepared the next day for the journalism conference at Columbia University.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @RRoggenstein.

For more about The Feather in NY, read the March 16 article, FC hits NY: Day 1 (Slideshow, Video).

Blood drive

IMG_5192Alexis Kalugin | The Feather Online Archive

The Emily Krieghoff Blood Drive will be on March 20. Please consider gifting blood to help a campus alumna.

Recently, one of our alumni was in an horrific car accident. Emily Krieghoff, ’09, was rushed to Community Hospital where if it wasn’t for the grace of God, the surgeons hands, and pints of blood she would not have survived. The Emily Krieghoff Blood Drive will be held in the FC parking lot from 1 p.m. – 5 p.m., March 20.

The blood will go to the Central California Blood Center, then will be distributed to hospitals around the Fresno area.

For more photos, visit Coming soon and Pamela Powell Memorial Garden.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.

By |2015-03-16T00:00:00-07:00March 16th, 2015|Alumni, Community Events, News, Photos 2014-15, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Blood drive honors FC alumna in recovery (VIDEO)

gabyAlexis Kalugin | The Feather Online Archive

The FCS community is again gathering support in a blood drive for Emily Krieghoff, March 20. Please donate for an Eagle alumna.

In the late hours of Saturday Feb. 21, FC alumni Molly Griffin and best friend Emily Krieghoff were victims of a fatal DUI accident. Molly Griffin was killed on site while Krieghoff is currently in recovery at Fresno Community Hospital.

Due to the essential role that blood donations have played in Krieghoff’s recovery and because of the tragic nature of the incident, the FC community will be partnering with Central California Blood Center in the first Emily Krieghoff Blood Drive, March 20.

The idea for the event was first purposed by Leadership and Economics teacher, Robert Foshee after Krieghoff’s mother suggested a blood drive. Foshee says that the event will provide an opportunity for both FC alumni and current students and staff members to come together as a community and support the Krieghoff family during a time in which they need it most.

“I think it’s a great way to give back to the community especially for our own alumni who have been touched by that,” Foshee said. “It’s something that you can do that’s easy. We’re also going to have a place where we can write messages and cards and if you want to help out the family during that time too there’s opportunities to do that. As a school it’s an opportunity to come together as a family.”

The Central Blood Center mobile will be stationed in the high school parking lot from 1-5 p.m., equipped with trained and experienced personnel. All potential donors are required to be in relatively stable health upon arrival at the mobile and must weigh at least 110lbs and be 16 years of age or older.

All student participants regardless of age, are required to obtain and present a signed permission slip upon arrival at the mobile. Permission slips are available for free download at Central Blood Center’s website. Students must also schedule an appointment for their donation prior to March 20 via email with either Foshee or school secretary, Vicky Belmont.

Central Blood Center holds all rights to deny donors participation if they fail to meet the before mentioned requirements or present any number of complicating factors such as abnormally high blood pressure or body temperature.

According to Central Blood Center, the process of blood donation works in a simple four step process. Firstly upon arrival participants must register with the use of a photo ID and social security number. These two items are required to register and those who do not posses proper identification will not be admitted into the Mobil.

The experience was fun and I felt important because I was giving to someone who needed it. I wanted to do it because I did it last year and I had a good time and wanted to do it again. I would encourage anyone who is able to participate because it is an easy and fast way to help people who are in need. –Senior Breanna Jennings

Secondly, Central Blood Center personnel will conduct a brief physical check up, measuring blood pressure and heart rate in order to assess the individual’s personal health. All health information that donors share with the personnel will be kept confidential.

The withdrawal of one pint of blood usually takes no more than 15 minutes and is a painless process. After completion participants will receive a T-shirt, a sweet treat and be encouraged to rest for a short amount of time before resuming daily activities.

Leadership member Breanna Jennings, ’15, previously donated at FC’s annual Max Hinton Blood Drive. She says that the opportunity provides a hands on and practical way to give back to the community and reach out to those who need love the most.

“The experience was fun and I felt important because I was giving to someone who needed it,” said Jennings. “I wanted to do it because I did it last year and I had a good time and wanted to do it again. I would encourage anyone who is able to participate because it is an easy and fast way to help people who are in need.”

Macy Mascarenas, ’16, knew both girls on a more personal level through her older sister. Mascarenas believes that the blood drive is a way to honor the memory of Molly Griffin and the generous sacrifice that saved Krieghoff’s life.

“I think the blood drive is a really good idea,” Mascarenas said. “These are young girls who went here and made such an impact on this school. I think the least we can do as a school is to dedicate it to them and to honor them.”

Update: Emily Krieghoff is scheduled to be released from Fresno Community Hospital, March 18.

To obtain permission slips or learn more information about donor qualifications, visit www. Centralvalleybloodcenter.com.

To follow Emily Krieghoff’s progress, visit caringbridge.org. Please read a guest post by Macy Mascarenas as she reflects on the life of Molly Griffin.

For another article news article read Campus families gather to support 32nd FC Auction.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @skylerklee.

Student Leadership: 32nd annual FCS auction

Student leadership is taking a more active role in promoting student involvement throughout this school year. Please return to read about how FC students are actively learning, serving and promoting teen events on and off campus in this weekly article series.

The 32nd annual FCS Auction is upon us. Student leaders will help serve, the choral and drama programs will be a part of the program and countless others will help in support roles throughout the evening. The event is sold out and administration is confident the school community will gather for Superintendent Jeremy Brown’s first auction, hoping to raise over $100,000.

unnamed-1Feather file photo

The 32nd annual FCS Auction is meant to bring the Eagle school community together in hopes of raising over $100,000, March 14.

The night of the auction will be full of exciting bidding and silent auction prizes. While the leadership students walk around the will be selling raffle tickets for the big auction prize.

Career Fair is on March 11, after lunch, the bell schedule will be on half day. All seniors are not allowed to go off campus for lunch due to the event.

After lunch all students are required to gather in the FC gym to be introduced to the career fair guests. This event will continue on until the end of the school day.

Night of the Stars (NOTS) will be held at Wolf Lakes at 5:30 p.m. until 10:30 p.m. Students can purchase NOTS tickets in the office with Vickey Belmont or at the ticket table at lunch. The first deadline for tickets will be this Friday, March 13.

The seating arrangement has been changed to seniors closest to the stage, the other table seatings will be first come first served. Although, if seniors do not have tickets purchased by the first deadline, they will be put in to first come first serve seating.

Table seats will no longer will reserved for any student past the first deadline. If tickets for reserved seats are not purchased the seat will be filled by a purchased ticket.

Ticket prices are at regular price which is $60, past the first deadline, the ticket prices will stay the same.

All students are encouraged to attend the event, whether it is with a date or a group of friends. The purpose of the event is to get the whole student body involved and to go out and have a fun time.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @sbbelmont98, Email: sbbelmont@gmail.com.

For more news, read the March 10 article, Campus families gather to support school.

LETTER: Childrens Hospital thanks friends

Dear Editor:

You know how chatty I am. But this morning, I’m speechless (well, almost). It’s official. Kids Day 2015 had raised $535,000 for Valley Children’s! That money goes to patient programs and services, helping kids like Neymar, this year’s Kids Day Ambassador.

A special “thanks” to all my newsie friends at The Fresno Bee, ABC30 Action News, KSEE24 News, KMPH FOX 26, CBS47 Fresno, KMJ, 93.7 Kiss Country, UnivisionFresno, Fresno State Focus and The Feather Online for covering the event! This couldn’t have happened without your support, as well!

This was originally posted March 10 on Zara Arboleda’s Facebook page, linking The Feather Online and the other news outlets as Childrens Hospital thanks supporters.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.

By |2015-03-11T00:00:00-07:00March 11th, 2015|Community Events, Letter to Editor, Uncategorized|0 Comments

LETTER: Spirit of serve day

feather-menuFeather illustration
In response to “COLUMN: Service day brings out human kindness:”

Dear Editor,

I do believe that service day brings out the best in us and that we don’t need a reward for serving, as the gratification from it is reward enough. In Rees Roggenstein’s article, he talks about how serve day brings out human kindness.

I agree with your points of the warm and fuzzy feeling you get inside when you serve another, as well as the bleak, hollow feeling you experience after an act of selfishness. I can say that I have experienced both of these feeling many times and the spirit of serve day lives on.

However, I have one thing to add regarding service. I feel as though a more genuine motivation for my desire to serve is that God has given so much to me, his forgiveness, grace and mercy makes me want to give back to the rest of the world to show my gratitude and thankfulness for all of my unearned privileges.

For more letters, read the Feb. 24 article, LETTER: Respecting unique characteristics.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.

By |2015-03-10T00:00:00-07:00March 10th, 2015|Community Events, Letter to Editor, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Civil rights photojournalist: Matt Herron

Alexis Kalugin | The Feather Online Archive

Photojournalist Matt Herron, and author of Mississippi Eyes, discusses his photo exhibit, “I’m Walkin’ For My Freedom -The Selma March & Voting Rights Act”, at Clovis Community College Center, March 9.

Photojournalist Matt Herron led a discussion at Clovis Community College Center to kick off his photo exhibit, “I’m Walkin’ For My Freedom -The Selma March & Voting Rights Act”, March 9. This exhibit includes 30 black and white photographs and is in the lobby of Clovis Community College Center Academic Center from March 9-April 13. All of the images were taken by Herron over a five-day period during the Selma to Montgomery March. Herron is also the author of a documentary book titled, Mississippi Eyes. It’s been 50 years since the Selma to Montgomery March; arguably one of the most significant Civil Rights marches in history. For more photos, visit Tennis schedule and Alive. Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.

By |2015-03-10T00:00:00-07:00March 10th, 2015|Community Events, News, Photos 2014-15, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Armenian Centennial Dance

ArmenianDanceMichael Fu

The Centennial concert included a Melody of Armenian Dances by the Hamazkayin Valley Chapter Niari Dance Group.

The Ani Guild of Fresno hosted the Armenian Genocide Centennial Concert at California State University, Fresno’s, Student Union, March 8. Junior Michael Fu attended the concert as part of his Armenian three-part series on the Armenian hundred years memorial.

The Centennial concert included a Melody of Armenian Dances by the Hamazkayin Valley Chapter Niari Dance Group.

For more information on Fu’s first article, read the March 4 article, Armenian artist reflects on genocide, homeland culture. Please return to The Feather to read his review of the Armenian Centennial Dance concert in the next few days. Fu will also attend the San Joaquin Valley Town Hall’s March 18 session: Man’s Inhumanity to Man … The Last Hundred Years, a panel reflection on the Armenian Genocide.

Additional information on this an other cultural events can be found on the Armenian Genocide Centennial–Fresno Committee website and the Ani Guild’s Facebook page. The Fresno Bee also covered the event: Armenian musicians and dancers mark Genocide with benefit concert.

For more photos, check out Heritage Sweepstakes winners and “When you wish”.

The Centennial concert included a Melody of Armenian Dances by the Hamazkayin Valley Chapter Niari Dance Group.For more information on Fu’s first article, read the March 4 article, Armenian artist reflects on genocide, homeland culture. Please return to The Feather to read his review of the Centennial concert in the next few days. Fu will also attend the San Joaquin Valley Town Hall’s March 18 session: Man’s Inhumanity to Man … The Last Hundred Years, a panel reflection on the Armenian Genocide.For more photos, check out Heritage Sweepstakes winners and “When you wish”.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.

By |2015-03-09T00:00:00-07:00March 9th, 2015|Community Events, Photos 2014-15, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Campus clubs sell Kids Day papers (VIDEO)

Editor’s Note: Check back later for more updates or via Twitter: @thefeather.

KidsDayFeather illustration

The Feather staff joined the leadership class to sell Fresno Bee Kids Day papers to benefit Children’s Hospital, March 3.

Each year, the community, Fresno Bee and ABC 30 all join forces to earn money for the patients of Valley Children’s Hospital. For the 28th time, Kids Day has encouraged hundreds of individuals to take time selling special edition Fresno Bee newspapers across the San Joaquin Valley to earn the money to help the cause, March 3.

Community members and campus students including notable figures and organizations from Mayor Ashley Swearengin, Police Chief Jerry Dyer, and Fresno State football coach Tim DeRuyter to student leadership and publications from FC.

This year, according to the Fresno Bee: an estimated amount of $340,500 and counting, has been provided at the time of 5 p.m., March 3. Children’s Hospital spokeswoman Zara Arboleda has stated this year’s goal of $530,000 is reachable.

Since last year, Children’s Hospital has received over $6.3 million in donations. This year they hope to past $7 million in an even greater effort to support the patients of the Madera County hospital.

Student leadership, began selling newspaper at a dim and chilly 4 a.m., along with The Feather staff who came just about 45 minutes later to corners at Alluvial and Cedar as well as Cedar and Alluvial. For several years now both campus clubs have participated in Kids Day to help Valley Children’s Hospital.

With a total amount of 980 newspapers sold, campus representatives were able to contribute $1,954.13 to the cause. Students were able to sell all the way till 9 a.m., where they then headed to their classes for the day.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.

For more on Kids Day 2015, read the Fresno Bee articles, A look back at Kids Day 2015: from celebrity corner to students in Oakhurst and Fresno’s Mendez family stays strong despite child’s medical battles.

For more videos, check out #SJW2015: Importance of Scholastic Journalism (Video).

Childrens Hospital drives central Valley volunteers (UPDATE, VIDEO, SLIDESHOW, PODCAST)

KidsDay1Kylie Bell

Feather adviser Greg Stobbe hawks special edition Kids Day newspapers with Fresno Mayor Ashley Swearengin, March 3.

Feather staff joins student leadership to hawk special Fresno Bee Kids Day papers

UPDATE: March. 11
After an estimate was given, March 3, for Kids Day, Valley Children’s Hospital was able to count the remainder of the money raised with a total of $535,000. Last year’s Kids Day reached a total of $480,000, which set a record for future fundraising. While this is not the total final count, Children’s Hospital has passed the goal for this year’s Kids Day reaching over the estimated $530,000.

Each year, the community, Fresno Bee and ABC 30 all join forces to earn money for the patients of Valley Children’s Hospital. For the 28th time, Kids Day has encouraged hundreds of individuals to take time selling special edition Fresno Bee newspapers across the San Joaquin Valley to earn the money to help the cause, March 3.

Community members and campus students including notable figures and organizations from Mayor Ashley Swearengin, Police Chief Jerry Dyer, and Fresno State football coach Tim DeRuyter to student leadership and publications from FC.

This year, according to the Fresno Bee: an estimated amount of $340,500 and counting, has been provided at the time of 5 p.m., March 3. Children’s Hospital spokeswoman Zara Arboleda has stated this year’s goal of $530,000 is reachable.

Since last year, Children’s Hospital has received over $6.3 million in donations throughout the course of its 28 year history. This year they hope to pass $7 million in an even greater effort to support the patients of the Madera County hospital.

Celebrity corner encourages notable figures from the community to volunteer

With the increase of involvement of a local whose who, Kids Day volunteers have deemed the corner of Blackstone and Shaw “celebrity corner”. Many notable figures from the community, as well as ABC 30 and the Fresno Bee, have used this corner to sell their newspapers for the last seven to eight years.

From the start of Kids Day, Fresno Bee has partnered with Valley Children’s Hospital. Each year they prepare these special edition newspapers for hundreds of individuals to sell. Fresno Bee Executive Editor Jim Boren has been apart of Kids Day since it’s beginnings. He really enjoys the chance the chance to help raise money for the hospital and thinks of the event as a symbol for the community.

“Well, Kids Day for one, raises a lot of money for the hospital, and does a lot of good things, but it’s also a symbolism of how important Valley Children’s Hospital is to our community,” Boren said. “This is a hospital that really cares for kids almost all of us have had either a child or a relative who has gone through that hospital and it does great work and we are just out here to help.”

Boren adds that the vision of Kids Day is expanding through the years. Along with just Fresno, efforts have been raised all across the San Joaquin Valley, including cities like Visalia and the youth of the community.

“More and more people are getting involved, we expanded across the Valley,” Boren said. “Visalia is a huge part of Kids Day, they do great work down their, especially in the high schools. So it’s expanded. This hospital has served the entire San Joaquin Valley and over the central coast, so it is an important part of the whole region.”

I have never been to this (Kids Day), and so it’s really nice seeing all these people trying to support us. Think about it this way: you are going to save a life, just by a dollar, you know, maybe fifty cents. You could spend five, ten dollars on something else, something you don’t even use. So you can make a difference with just a little bit of money. –-Juan Mendez, father of Neymar Mendez, 2015 Kids Day ambassador child

ABC 30 has also partnered with Children’s Hospital, along with the Fresno Bee, to broadcast Kids Day all day long, promoting the event. ABC 30 news reporter Amanda Venegas has estimated the volunteers of the event to over 5,000. Using the hashtag #KidsDay2015, people could promote over social media, which Venegas thinks has helped the event.

“If I could have all of our reporters out showcasing the different locations that would be really neat,” Venegas said. “But we just showcase different areas of Fresno that we can make it out to. Besides the dozens of people you see here, there is about 5,300 volunteers all over the County, like in Visalia and Merced. There is people even in the Oakhurst area that are selling newspapers right now that you don’t see. And I think social media has been huge because we can actually see what people are doing and we don’t have to be there.”

Valley Children’s Hospital Ambassador Family was able to come to support Kids Day and encourage others to donate to the cause. Juan Mendez, father of Neymar Mendez, the ambassador child, was excited to see the involvement the community offered during Kids Day and the chance to see others give their time and money for the cause.

“I have never been to this (Kids Day), and so it’s really nice seeing all these people trying to support us,” Mendez said. “Think about it this way: you are going to save a life, just by a dollar, you know, maybe fifty cents. You could spend five, ten dollars on something else, something you don’t even use. So you can make a difference with just a little bit of money.”

President and CEO of Valley Children’s Hospital Todd Suntrapak echoes Mendez’ sentiments.

President and CEO of Valley Children’s Hospital Todd Suntrapak, who was born and raised in Fresno, participated in Kids Day as well. As once a patient of Children’s Hospital, Suntrapak thinks of this event as a way to help out the children of the San Joaquin Valley.

“It’s the least I can do to take my time and come out here and thank all the terrific volunteers that are working on our behalf today,” Suntrapak said. “But more importantly on behalf of making kids well, I mean really, that’s what essentially is happening here. All these volunteers are donating their time and selling papers in partnership with ABC 30 and the Fresno Bee at the end to really a child. It’s my pleasure to be here; I wouldn’t miss it.”

Mayor Ashley Swearengin has been selling newspapers on ‘celebrity corner’ since it’s start. With other notable figures, Swearengin adds that it all comes back to help the patients.

“Every year it just gets more and more exciting,” Swearengin said. “More and more people are here, we have students from Fresno State and athletic coaches. We’ve got our law enforcement leaders other elected officials and people are out here for the same reason: to help Childrens Hospital.”

Campus works with San Joaquin Valley to sell newspapers

Student leadership, began selling newspaper at a dim and chilly 4 a.m., along with The Feather staff who came just about 45 minutes later to corners at Alluvial and Cedar as well as Cedar and Alluvial. For several years now both campus clubs have participated in Kids Day to help Valley Children’s Hospital.

With a total amount of 980 newspapers sold, campus representatives were able to contribute $1,954.13 to the cause. Students were able to sell all the way till 9 a.m., where they then headed to their classes for the day.

Senior John Dooman has been participating in Kids Day for three years. While he did not sell as many newspapers as he expected, selling one encouraged him to appreciate his time during the day.

“This year I was a little late waking up, but I was glad that I could make it to Kids Day,” Dooman said. “Even though I didn’t sell a crazy amount of newspapers, the chance to even sell one is enough to help a child in need. No matter how early it was, I’m happy I went.”

Freshman Jaden Ventura has never been part of Kids Day till this year. As a member of The Feather he was able to be encouraged by the community around him as they donated thousands of dollars to the cause.

“I remember that I was on the corner and someone gave $20 for a paper and it made me realize that people really do care about Kids Day,” Ventura said. “Being able to help be apart of such a noble cause really made the entire day worth it.”

Opinions Editor Rees Roggenstein, also contributed to this article.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @rynnking_.

For more on Kids Day 2015, read the Fresno Bee articles, A look back at Kids Day 2015: from celebrity corner to students in Oakhurst and Fresno’s Mendez family stays strong despite child’s medical battles.

For more features, read the March 3 article, WWII Veteran receives long awaited medal.

California Boys Tennis Classic at FCC

tennisAlexis Kalugin | The Feather Online Archive

FC will be participating in the California Boys Tennis Classic, March 6-7. Over 100 high schools all around Central California will contend for first place.

Kicking off the tennis season, FC will be participating in the California Boys Tennis Classic. Boys will be coming from over 100 high schools all around Central California to contend for first place. The FC boys will be practicing with their team and  will take on the other high schools on Friday, March 6.

The FC tennis team will be competing at Fresno City College throughout the day, March 6-7.  FC will be hosting the tournament and will be versing three other teams that day.  FC will be playing against Atwater High School at 8:30 a.m.

Later on in the day at 11:30 a.m., they will take on West Bakersfield High School. Finishing off the day FC will go head to head against Kingsburg High School. The final outcome of the Friday games will be determining where the teams will be scheduled, March 7.

Each team will play five matches, Three matches on Friday and two on Saturday. The matches will consist of three singles and three doubles making a total of nine players. Times for Saturday will be available on the website by 7:30 p.m. on Friday night.

Tennis coach Robert Foshee, talks about his overall thoughts on the tennis tournament tomorrow.

“I think the tournament will be a good practice because a lot of our jv guys, our young guys, will get a chance to play so well know the first match,” Foshee said. “I’m really looking forward to a lot of good matches that well have the opportunity to play. Especially with our one and third players missing. never know but hopefully well as a team step up and I think well have a good chance.”

Senior, Jordan Castro, ’15, talks about his expectations on the tournament.

“I think it a great opportunity for us to practice as a team and get ready for league,” Castro said. “It takes a little bit more endurance since were going to be playing sets as opposed to an 8-game pro set so I expect our team to go out and play hard. I will be playing at the number two position which I’m not really used to but still I’m hoping to play well. As a team I hope we will be able to play well and go against these divisions two and three schools and putting up a fight against them. Its gonna be a lot of tough matches but I think FC will persevere.”

Sophomore, Julian Castro, ’17, shares his thoughts on his first tennis tournament.

“Since this will be my first time playing in a tennis tournament I don’t know but I think I’ve definitely improved from last year so im hoping for the best,” Julian said. “Since im playing in the six im hoping to improve overall as a player and see how I match up against the other more dominant players. As a team I think we will do great since we have such a great team this year.”

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.

By |2015-03-05T00:00:00-07:00March 5th, 2015|Community Events, Spring, Uncategorized|1 Comment

BRIEF: Choir to attend Heritage Festival, March 5-8

FC file photo

The choir, ladies ensemble, jazz band will all attend the Worldstrides Heritage Music Festival, March 5-8.

The FC band and choral groups will be traveling to the Los Angeles area to participate in the Worldstrides Heritage Festival program, March 5-8.

The choral groups sing and play prepared repertoire for three judges, or adjudicators. These professional musicians and college professors grade each group based on a series of various factors such as tone, balance, diction and musicality.

Another reason to sing and play at festivals is to hear other groups perform. This gives students a chance to listen to other music, and inspire them to become better musicians. The highest score is usually 100 points, with 90-100 being “Superior.”

This festival hands out rankings as well, with trophies awarded in several categories. If a group is particularly advanced, the adjudicators can invite them to a “Gold” festival, which is usually held at Carnegie Hall in New York City.

The FC women’s ensemble has been invited to the Gold Festival before, but has not attended. All the choral groups are working diligently on festival repertoire. Each song must have a high level of difficulty, and cross over different eras and styles of music. For example, the HS choir will sing a Latin piece called “Jubilate Deo,” performed acapella.

They will also sing a Canadian folk song entitled “Rattle on the Stovepipe.” Lastly, they are singing a spiritual melody, “1 Peter 3:15”, which features soloists Andrew Guthrie, Elise Winegarden and Ivette Ibarra will be presenting to the judges. This year, ladies ensemble will attend Heritage as well as the junior high choir, high school band and choir. The groups will depart from school at lunch on Thursday, March 5, and will be traveling to their hotel in Irvine. Dinner will be provided at Medieval Times, and Friday will be spent at Disneyland.

Newly appointed high school choir director Susan Ainley, talks about the Heritage Festival.

With this being my second year on the Heritage trip, I’m really looking forward to Disneyland which is gonna be a lot of fun especially with friends. I’m also really excited to stay at the hotel because the previous year we had a really great time watching movies and hanging out. I am very confident in our ability to execute our performance perfectly and with no setbacks. We have really go soloists that really set us apart from other choral groups. –Junior Andrew Moore

“I am especially looking forward to the day at Disneyland, since my daughter, Bree Ainley, works there,” Ainley said. “Saturday will be spent at the Rose Center Theatre in Westminster, performing the set of songs prepared. Once the festival has finished, the students will eat dinner, then head back to Disneyland for the awards ceremony. The long weekend will likely finish in the early hours of Sunday morning, as the bus rolls back into the FC parking lot.”

Andrew Moore, ’16, talks about his experience and thoughts on the Heritage Festival.

“With this being my second year on the Heritage trip I’m really looking forward to Disneyland which is gonna be a lot of fun especially with friends,” Moore said. “I’m also really excited to stay at the hotel because the previous year we had a really great time watching movies and hanging out. I am very confident in our ability to execute our performance perfectly and with no setbacks. We have really go soloists that really set us apart from other choral groups.”

While singing is the reason to head south, Hannah Nale, ’17, has another reason to travel.

“I’m super stoked for going to Disneyland with all of my friends and just having a bunch of fun,” Nale said. “We have super cool songs and a super cool conductor and we have a super cool group of people. With this being my first time on the trip, it would be an amazing experience to get the gold and hopefully we as a family will be able to come together and accomplish that.”

While freshman Celeste Counts is excited about Disneyland, she is concerned about her role in the festival.

“I am most looking forward to hanging out with my friends at Disneyland,” Counts said. “I’m not exactly sure how I’ll stand out from the competition, but I hope that my good vowel shape and discipline will help me with that. This is my second year going to the Festival trip and it seems to get more and more fun every year.”

These writers can be reached via Twitter: @_jadenventura03 and @Devin_pits1735.

For more news, read the March 3 article, Student leadership: FCS 32nd annual auction is March 14.

By |2015-03-04T00:00:00-07:00March 4th, 2015|Community Events, FC Arts, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Armenian artist reflects on genocide, homeland culture

P1090795_FotorMichael Fu

Original Armenian sculptures and paintings are displayed at the new exhibit at the Fresno Art Museum. Including pieces from Arminee Shishmanian.

Fresno Art Museum displays Armenian Genocide art

Fresno Art Museum currently features an emotionally moving and historically important exhibition to commemorate the 100th year anniversary of the Armenian Genocide. Named “1915-2015: Tradition, Legacy, Culture“, the exhibit reflects the the very first massacre in the 20th century.

All of the exhibit art pieces, including painting, sculptures and mixed art, are created by Armenian descendant artists.

Arminee Shishmanian, a local Armenian artist who participated in this exhibit, shared her family’s experience during and after the Genocide as well as her journey in the world of art.

On April 24, 1915 the Ottoman Empire gathered hundreds of Armenian community leaders and started the elimination targeted on the Armenian population inhabited in Turkey.

Between 1915 and 1923, three fourths of the Armenian population was wiped out of the world. The luckiest of all escaped from this massacre and emigrated to United States and several European countries. Many of them eventually settled down in Fresno due to the agricultural tradition they are familiar with.

Born in a family consist of Armenian culture, Shishmanian’s father formed a band when he came to the United States, which allowed her to witness the treasure culture even when the entire country is long lost. Shishmanian inherited the spirit and transform applied it into her art.

Sculpture of couple dancer facing each other is one of the bronze sculptures Shishmanian has made. The expression of the male dancer shows his deep devotion into the music and the hanging leg seems like it is still waiting to land on the ground. The female dancer has her dress floating in the air waiting to let it freely pulled by the gravity.

Arminee Shishmanian was born and raised in St. Louis, MO, the fourth city her family settled in. She eventually moved to Los Angeles with her mother and got married in Fresno.

Although Shishmanian did not experience the genocide in person, the tragedy befell on her parents when they were teenagers.

Shishmanian’s mom was 13 years old when Mehmed Talaat Pasha (the interior minister of Ottoman Empire at the time) ordered Turkish troops to remove all Arminians from the villages. Fortunately, she went to Constantinople (today’s Istanbul) for an Adenoidectomy right before the Turks started gathering Arminian in the villages and sending them on the death march to Syria. Most of her extended family members passed away during the death march due to deprivation of food and water as well as frequent rape, robbery and massacre.

I thought about it {relating her work to genocides}, but my personality and disposition does not want to dwell on sadness, because genocide is just a brutal thing. I actually was considering making a painting relating to the genocide, particularly to the removal of the people sent onto the death march. I have planned on this but it just wouldn’t come out. Most of the works I do has sort of an upbeat and positive angle. –Arminee Shishmanian, a local Armenian artist

Her father, ironically, was serving in the Turkish army at the time; while his family, along with some others in the area, gathered in the Armenian church and burned alive. When he found out the truth, he defected from the Turkish army and joined the French Foreign legion to fight the Turks.

After World War II was over, knowing zero English words, her father moved to the United States to attend Ohio State University.

As international students, we know how hard it is to come to America with limited English skills. But the courage he had that led him here is simply unimaginable.

Unlike most of the artist, Shishmanian have not been introduced to art until when she was 60 years old.

Guided by her neighbor and good friend, painter Marcia Freeman, Shishmanian developed the skill of watercolor. Later in 1995, dedicated to improve her skills, Shishmanian decided to join the art program at California State University, Fresno where she found another interest in clay.

Despite her tragic lost of the family, Shishmanian rarely reflect sadness or anger on her art work.
“I thought about it {relating her work to genocides}, but my personality and disposition does not want to dwell on sadness, because genocide is just a brutal thing,” Shishmanian said. “I actually was considering making a painting relating to the genocide, particularly to the removal of the people sent onto the death march. I have planned on this but it just wouldn’t come out. Most of the works I do has sort of an upbeat and positive angle.”

Shishmanian rarely have any preference to her pieces since she regard her pieces as many of her children. Each of them have a special spot in her heart. However, Shishmanian does have a favorite piece.

Using bright red, green and yellow in the art work, an oil painting of her four grandchildren was her favor piece in the house. With the bright colors, the painting delivers viewers warmth and happiness. The fact that children wearing jeans and long clothing suggest the cold temperature, but the bright sunshine came from the top right corner and the distinction of the shadow under the woods gives a warm feeling the viewers. Four children looking at the same direction over the edge brings the curiosity of the viewers along with them. Seems like something interesting is far in the background. A still picture brings the viewers back into their naive childhood.

Armenian Genocide is just a tip of an iceberg that represents the cruelty in human history. The suffer of Shishmanian’s Family and many others can not be changed. For people living in 21st Century, it is hard to imagine that these tragedies happened only a hundred years ago.

However, in the news we still see people committing terrible things to each other due to cultural and religious differences. Although we cannot change the past, our generation can definitely help to ensure that some certain parts of our history will not happen again.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather,  Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @MojunPan and @MichaelFu.

For more opinions, read the Feb. 27 column, Thankful for Scholastic Journalism Week 2015.

By |2015-03-04T00:00:00-07:00March 4th, 2015|Community Events, Features, Opinions, Uncategorized|3 Comments

Student leadership: 32nd annual FCS auction is March 14

IMG_0357Jason Swain | The Feather Online Archive

Student leadership is joining forces with The Feather Online staff to sell Kids Day papers, March 3, and the 32nd annual FCS auction, March 14.

Student leadership is taking a more active role in promoting student involvement throughout this school year. Please return to read about how FC students are actively learning, serving and promoting teen events on and off campus in this weekly article series.

Student leadership is gearing up for three events in the next month: Kids Day, the 32nd annual FCS auction and NOTS.

Kids Day, March 3, all leadership students were required to be at Maple and Alluvial by 4 a.m. The ASB members must be there at 4:30 a.m., and journalism students must be at Cedar and Alluvial by 5 a.m.

Night of the Stars (NOTS) is on March 28 and early bird ticket prices are being extended from March 2 to March 6. After early bird prices of $55 is unavailable tickets will be raised to $60. In order to attend NOTS, a ticket must be purchased. If students desire to go with a date, start asking and buying tickets.

As far as seating goes, seniors will be granted a first row seat. All other students will be given spots based on a first-come-first-serve system. It is recommended that pupils hurry and get seating arranged if they want to claim a desirable spot.

The next special day event will be March 4, Western Day, in which all students are encouraged to dress in anything western themed. As a reward for dressing up, students will be given root beer floats at lunch.

The next event will be March 17, in honor of St. Patrick’s Day. The activity will be a scavenger hunt. The prize students will look for are pots of gold, and once found, they can be brought to the office in exchange for a gift card.

The school’s 32nd annual FCS Auction is coming up on March 14. There will be a competition between all grades to see who brings the most auction items. The rewards granted per item will be listed in the hallway downstairs in Building 5.

Leadership students will be selling raffle tickets at the auction, so look around for any students to buy raffle tickets. At the auction there will be a silent and a live event.

Basketball intramurals took place last week, Feb. 26 and 27. Each team went into the FC gym and played against each team in a type of tournament form or playing. At the end of the event, the winning team contained, Tyler Breedlove, ’16, Justin Houts, ’16, Chris Kollenkark, ’16, and Bailey Brogan, ’16.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @sbbelmont98, Email: sbbelmont@gmail.com.

For more news, read the March 2 article, BRIEF: Leadership, journalism students to attend Kids Day, March 3.

Early morning

ffuyfufAlexis Kalugin | The Feather Online Archive

Leadership students and The Feather staff woke up early this morning to sell Kid’s Day papers, March 3.

Leadership students and The Feather staff woke up early this morning to sell Kid’s Day papers, March 3.

Groups of students arrived to school at 4 a.m. to get busy selling. “The morning started off slow because there aren’t may cars on the street at 4 a.m.”, said Senior Callista Fries. Students eagerly sold papers till 9 a.m. Later, when the total number of papers sold is determined we will let you know.

Newspapers can be sold until 3 p.m. so theres still time to donate to Valley Children’s Hospital and grab yourself a newspaper!

Update: According to Leadership Adviser Robert Foshee we made $1954.13 and sold about 920 newspapers.

For more information about this event click Kid’s Day; also look at the Feather’s Instagram and Twitter. #KidsDay2015

For more photos, visit Basketball season is finished and Balloon lab.

By |2015-03-03T00:00:00-07:00March 3rd, 2015|Community Events, Photos 2014-15, Uncategorized|0 Comments

BRIEF: Leadership, journalism students sell Kids Day papers, March 3

Screen Shot 2015-02-26 at 2.10.41 PMFresno Bee illustration

Student leadership and The Feather Online staff will join thousands of community volunteers to sell special edition Kids Day papers, March 3.

Kids Day began in 1988 as a charity to support Children’s Hospital in Central California, a non-profit children’s hospital.

Kids Day this year will be held on March 3. Volunteers all over Fresno County and beyond will sell Kids Day papers, special edition copies of the Fresno Bee. The proceeds from everyone in the city go to Children’s Hospital in Central California. The hospital will then spend the money to help kids or improve their experience.

Everyday commuting routine will be broken by thousands of volunteers lining the streets and selling newspapers for the 28th annual Kids Day. The issues feature stories and profiles of young patients at the hospital.

This year Kids Day will give FC students a chance to help support the cause. Leadership students will be at FC at 4 a.m. on the Day while Feather staffers will be here at 5 a.m. We will be on the corners of Maple and Alluvial and Cedar and Alluvial. Kids Day edition papers are $1.

While Kids Day edition papers cost $1, many people give a bigger donation. All proceeds are returned to and help Childrens Hospital Central California.

Kids Day offers everyone in the community the opportunity to sell papers. Schools all over town, members of the police force and many others gather along the streets to sell papers.

Who wouldn’t want to wake up at 3 a.m. and go out and serve in your community and make a positive difference in kids lives. It’s tiring but it is what you make out of it, getting through the rest of the day is always tough but in the end it is always worth it. — Senior Aaron DeWolf

Aaron Dewolf, ’15, has participated in Kids Day since his freshman year and looks forward to his last year serving with FC.

“Who wouldn’t want to wake up at 3 a.m. and go out and serve in your community and make a positive difference in kids lives,” DeWolf said. “It’s tiring but it is what you make out of it, getting through the rest of the day is always tough but in the end it is always worth it.”

Robert Foshee is in charge of all Kids Day operations here at FC and gives insight into the upcoming.

“It is a great opportunity to serve in the community because Children’s Hospital helps so many kids. My own daughter had heart surgery there and they were wonderful,” Foshee said. “Our goal is to sell 1,000 newspapers and beat last years total of $1,700. I enjoy Kids Day because it is a great opportunity for students to wake up early and sell papers together.”

If you don’t see one of the volunteers, there are other ways to help. Text GEORGE to 90999 to make a $5 donation to Valley Children’s Website.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @dawsontriplitt.

For more news, read the Feb. 26 article, BRIEF: Teachers prepare to serve at McDonalds, Feb. 26.

By |2015-03-02T00:00:00-07:00March 2nd, 2015|Community Events, Leadership, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Serve day unites student body, spreads joy (VIDEO)

IMG_9822Alexis Kalugin | The Feather Online Archive

The second school-wide Serve Day rallies the whole campus to volunteer in multiple places across the city including painting over graffiti near railroad tracks, Feb. 19.

The second annual school-wide serve day took place, Feb. 19. Students signed up for their location of choice earlier in the week during chapel and prayed to leave a positive impact on the community.

The different service sites include: the Community Food Bank, Poverello House, park clean up, Neighborhood Thrift, two graffiti clean up sites, connecting with students at Kepler Elementary School and a yard work group.

The students were assigned their chaperones and buses after a rally like chapel and were encouraged to serve with a joyful heart and spread the love of Christ.

Leadership advisor Vickey Belmont gives insight into the second annual FC serve day.

“After last years first serve day and it being pretty successful, we were already planning on continuing the service,” Belmont said. “We work some of the kinks our from last year and improved in some areas. I think that this year was a great success and I am looking forward to the many more serve days to come.”

Freshman Erin Wilson found serve day to be much more rewarding than she had originally thought.

“I was expecting it to be a lot less fun than it actually was, I thought it was going to be boring but I had a really great time helping out at the Neighborhood Thrift Store,” Wilson said. “I think we were a big help to them we hung up two giant boxes of clothes and I’m really glad the school put this day on.”

Sophomore Julian Castro helped clean up an elderly man’s yard with his friends and enjoyed shining the light of Christ to him and others.

“We mowed his lawn, picked up piles of leaves, and picked up logs and branches from his property. To be honest I had a really great time, even though im not one to enjoy yardwork I found myself workng hard and having fun,” Castro said. “I do feel like we made an impact on his life because it makes him feel better when he looks out his window and sees a freshly cleaned yard. I think it’s the least we could do for him.

Junior Maddie Luginbill was in the graffiti clean up group and found that serving with friends makes the ward work fun and worth it.

“Last year I was at the food bank and this year I was with a lot of my friends and I was more interested in painting than I was about bagging food so I was more excited to help out this year,” Luginbill said. “The chaperone told us that by this time next week all the graffiti would be back up and it made me sad that people don’t respect the community but we poured ourselves into our work and it was worth it.”

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @gaby_siqueiros.

For more features, read the Feb. 24 article, Speaker educates on body language, power of communication.

Cuddy educates on body language, power of communication

Harvard professor Amy Cuddy shares at San Joaquin Valley Town Hall

IMG_3363Choe Mueller

Harvard graduate Amy Cuddy shares her expertise about body language during the San Joaquin Valley Town Hall, Feb. 18.

As a continuation of the San Joaquin Valley Town Hall Lecture Series, Harvard graduate Amy Cuddy made a pit stop in Fresno to share some of her knowledge, Feb. 18. Row after row in the William Saroyan Theater was filled with listeners, eager to hear what the renowned speaker had to share with them.

As a pretense, I was aware that Cuddy spoke in one of the most viewed, most influential TED Talks online. I had also heard that she worked in the field of Psychology. However, I did not expect such a hands-on, applicable lesson from the Harvard professor.

Before the official speech, Cuddy spent some time with the attending Merit Scholars (various recommended students from schools scattered along the Central Valley) answering personalized questions. From the moment she spoke, it was clear that Cuddy did not let her vast knowledge and academia lead her onto a track that was difficult for audiences slightly less educated on her topic (such as I) to understand. She chose simple wording to explain fascinating phenomenas.

When asked about her realm of study, Cuddy explained her particular field of work within psychology.

“I study normal people; I’m not a clinical psychologist so I don’t take patients,” Cuddy said. “What I do is follow the Scientific Method in a very literal and precise way. For example, I will ask a question and randomly assign participants to one condition or another and then we will study the results.”

As her pre-speech audience was formed of primarily merit students, still enrolled in high school, there was much interest around Cuddy’s work on her college campus. Upon questioning about her methods, Cuddy gave examples of her teaching style – and that of Harvard Business School.

“We teach using the case method, and the students have to read a business case, which someone at Harvard Business School has written,” Cuddy said. “It might be about a traditional business predicament or a more advanced case, but the students are left with a question at the end of each case and are expected to come to class and start a discussion.”

I find it very obvious when someone is scripting their body language, so I wouldn’t advise someone to do that. I think that it’s good to understand what different queues signal. I teach an approach that I developed with some other practitioners, its called ‘Inside-out’, and it’s based upon method acting. So people are much better at projecting real ordinated synchronized body language when they are doing it from a honest place, so they get themselves into that frame of mind. — Amy Cuddy, Harvard professor

While the question-and-answer session orbited around topics such as college and majors, her lecture session was based on a plethora of facts and findings on the topic that Cuddy gravitates towards most: body language.

However, when many hear the phrase ‘body language’, they tend to think of how their movements affect others. On the contrary, the majority of the lecture was focused on how our personal body language can affect us and Cuddy educates on body language.

A major theme was the encouragement of using ‘power stances/positions’, in which the human body becomes large and takes up space (ie., raising your arms to the sky). These positions – as studied in Cuddy’s lab – are directly correlated with a rise in testosterone levels and a plummet in cortisol levels. This balance creates a motivated human being with low stress levels.

Now, while much emphasis was put on positive positioning, Cuddy also warned against ‘faking it until you make it’. Unnatural stances (positive or not) are easy to detect, and can actually have a negative effect. So, rather than forcing yourself into a broad position during a job interview, practice making yourself comfortable in a confident position at home!

Cuddy explains the reasoning behind avoiding false body language, and explains her theory which she calls ‘inside out’.

“I find it very obvious when someone is scripting their body language, so I wouldn’t advise someone to do that,” Cuddy said. “I think that it’s good to understand what different queues signal. I teach an approach that I developed with some other practitioners, its called ‘Inside-out’, and it’s based upon method acting. So people are much better at projecting real ordinated synchronized body language when they are doing it from a honest place, so they get themselves into that frame of mind.”

The next San Joaquin Valley Town Hall will be March 18 when scholars and religious leaders will host a reflection on the Armenian Genocide, discussing issues from reconciliation to contributions to American culture, arts and sciences. The presentation is Man’s Inhumanity to Man … The Last Hundred Years. Look for a review after that session by The Feather staff.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_chloemueller.

For more features, read the Feb. 23 article, Scholastic Journalism Week 2015: Join the discussion.

By |2015-02-24T00:00:00-07:00February 24th, 2015|Community Events, Features, Uncategorized|1 Comment

Scholastic Journalism Week 2015: Join the discussion

StaffSJWJeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

As The Feather has been headlining student events, featuring stories about Homecoming, issues of social equality and the sport season beginnings, this week the tables are reversed. To promote the importance of school publications, the Journalism Education Association (JEA) has sponsored the annual Scholastic Journalism Week, Feb. 22-28.

The organization encourages student journalists to raise awareness, promoting its significance to the community. Along with a student created poster template, the JEA has listed several ideas for student and publication adviser participants.

While the event is geared towards those apart of a educational journalism program, community members, including readers and students can get involved. Throughout the week, The Feather will be watching social media including Twitter and Instagram, by creating a hashtag: #FCJW as well as #SJW2015 which will appear in a Storify collection.

National Scholastic Journalism Week was created for the support of the First Amendment which states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

Responses from staff writers, editors and advisers, were documented in order to highlight the significance of journalism education not just nationwide, but locally.

The Feather wants to encourage students and readers to submit their opinions in the comment section on the effects of journalism and why seeking out and reporting the news is important. Please consider adding to or joining Scholastic Journalism Week 2015: Join the discussion.

Relevance of the world
Emily Ladd, ’16
Feb. 27, 2015

“What’s going on in the world is extremely relevant, especially seeing as everyone lives in it. Journalists and people alike should seek news, but journalists make what’s important known and more accessible to everyone, finding all facts they can. Journalism raises awareness for the events around us.”

Freedom of speech: A beautiful gift
Rees Roggenstein, ’16
Feb. 27, 2015

“Scholastic Journalism Week is incredibly important, and not just to journalists and those involved with media. It exemplifies the right to freedom of speech that we as Americans have been afforded, which is a gift that is not freely given. It is a time to express one’s opinion in complete and brutal honesty. It is a time to truly express one’s freedom of speech. This is a week that all who practice freedom of speech can celebrate such a beautiful gift.”

Epitome of student journalism
Kathryn Damschen, ’15
Feb. 27, 2015

“Scholastic Journalism Week is the epitome of student journalism. It is a week solely dedicated to the media, news, and information that we gather each and every day. I personally believe it is a great endeavor to be a part of, as it brings awareness to what we do as a whole (being a part of a journalism staff). It is critical to be knowledgable of the work you do and why you’re apart of such a ting, if anything. My thoughts are, what good is doing something if you don’t know what it is or why you’re doing it?”

News 24/7
Michael Fu, ’16
Feb. 27, 2015

“The importance of journalist went out to seek the new and report it is because without the motivation to seek the news or to report them. The society has no way other than having the eye witness the even that happened in front of them to discovered the things happen in school, town or the whole nation. The journalist who seek the news allow the people to connect each other and form a bobble where everyone know what is going on in this very moment. Without the journalist, the people have to look for the news 24/7 by themselves in order to keep up with the world. As a conclusion, we as a journalist who seek the news and report them allows others to be aware of things happened around them and bring the community closer than it was before.”

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StaffSJW15Jeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

 

Face and fix society
Toby Pan, ’15
Feb. 27, 2015

“America is not the only country that have the freedom of speech stated in the Constitution, but it is one of the few countries that have this important right widely applied to their people on a daily basis. Unlike some of the countries whose media industries are controlled by the government, the journalists here are endowed with considerable freedom to express their own opinions. On top of that, the journalists’ good work ensured that the public are informed of what’s happening domestically and globally; so that Americans, although have made a lot of mistakes, can always face and fix their society on time.”

Spreading the Word
Chloe Mueller, Editor-in-Chief
Feb. 26, 2015

“On campus, I don’t think journalism is viewed as relative to the lives of students unless they are directly involved with the class. This week gives us – as journalists – a chance to spread the word and importance of journalism to our classmates who don’t prioritize it.”

Exposing the Truth
Justin Houts, Writer
Feb. 26, 2015

“It’s important for journalists to seek the news and report it; by doing so we can insure that our rights and enforce rules and laws. It’s news reporting that exposed Watergate, the Clinton scandal, and many other historical events that wouldn’t have otherwise been made known had they not been exposed by journalists. The U.S. is one of the few countries that allows it’s citizens to speak freely about their beliefs and ideas, and if we don’t use this opportunity to the fullest potential its being wasted and not taken as the privilege it truly is.”

Week of opportunities
Olivia Quebe, ’16
Feb. 23, 2015

“I see Scholastic Journalism Week as an opportunity to make people aware of the importance of journalism. It is a way to get the students involved and informed not only during this week, but for the rest of the year. I’m excited to see the responses of the students and special events to come.”

Educate ourselves
Trevor Beal, News Editor
Feb. 23, 2015

“In my opinion it is important for journalists of all ages to seek out the real news because without that key characteristic we risk becoming mindless believers of mass media. Our job is to educate ourselves and others in current affairs and how we are affected by them.”

Its a big deal
Sydney Belmont, ’17
Feb. 23, 2015

“Scholastic Journalism Week is a huge deal. Students are encouraged to promote journalism. It is a way to get the student body involved and informed about what is going on during the week. I am looking forward to all the excitement involved in this week.”

Journalism happenings
Natalia Torres, ’16
Feb. 23, 2015

“Scholastic Journalism week is the week to promote journalism. Students who are already in journalism should be informing others about what journalism is about and about joining journalism. This way the student body can be updated on what events are happening as they are happening.”

A journalist’s perspective
John Dooman, Reviews Editor
Feb. 23, 2015

“Every journalists needs to report on certain stories to provide their own take on it. Two journalists would report a story in their own way from their own, unique point of view. This allows readers and/or viewers to come to their own conclusions on how news is covered.”

Club recognition
Jenny King, ’17
Feb. 23, 2015

“Scholastic Journalism Week is really exciting; as a club on the campus, this week is a recognition of the hard work that the staff puts in. It’s a fun way for students and staffers to be involved in their school newspaper.”

Effective reporting
Sara Peterson, Editor-in-Chief
Feb. 23, 2015

“Journalists need to report because it gives themselves and people around them insight into what is happening locally or in the world. Our job as journalist is to effectively report and share these stories with our fellow man.”

Think, Engage, Teach
Greg Stobbe, Publications Adviser
Feb. 23, 2015

“Journalists, and I’m being inclusive of Feather reporters, have an obligation to seek out and report the news, profiles, stories and issues that are important to their constituencies {peers} and community. This is an obligation, not whether they ‘feel like it.’ The Feather staff in particular is charged to present to the greater Fresno community who Fresno Christian citizens are and represent them. The journalists on this campus need to bear witness and independently write and comment on the news and the controversies, its peoples’ failures and success, struggles and the stories of overcoming, calling into question when peers are not morally or ethically responsible and report the accomplishments and/or consequences. The Feather staff must give fair, accurate perspective to the goings on, in and around the Fresno Christian community. They are not just to watch but to stimulate conversation so as to engage fellow students to listen, dialogue and act on truth so that the community not only knows it but also uses it in relationship. Think responsible. Be engaged. Teach the tools of citizenship.”

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @rynnking_.

For more features, read the Feb. 20 article, Fresno hosts horror movie, to be released nationally.

By |2015-02-23T00:00:00-07:00February 23rd, 2015|Community Events, FC Arts, Features, Uncategorized|1 Comment

Fresno hosts horror movie, to be released nationally

unnamed-1Courtesy The Gallows

FIlm producers Travis Cluff and Chris Lofing have brought Fresno-based horror film to the big screen.

Although Fresno is conveniently located in the Central Valley, between entertainment capitals such as San Francisco and Los Angeles, the city itself is rarely considered a prime area for national attention. However, the minds of Travis Cluff and Chris Lofing have brought together a film that takes place primarily on the streets of Fresno.

The film, which is set to be released July 10, is titled The Gallows. The movie piqued the interest of many major film labels, but was eventually bought by New Line Cinema. The piece also has been worked on by Jason Blum, the producer of franchises such as ‘Paranormal Activity’ and ‘The Purge’.

The Gallows will fall under the horror genre, and focuses on an eerie event that supposedly took place in the midwest. Because of this, a few of the scenes were filmed in parts of Nebraska. However, the primary landscape seen in this film belongs to Fresno.

The purpose behind the setting is co-producer, Cluff’s association with Fresno. Cluff discussed the convenience of Fresno’s location for filming.

“I currently live in Fresno with my family,” Cluff said. “I met Chris when he was here filming for school in LA, and we decided to come to Fresno to film because it is less expensive to film here. Fresno is in close proximity to Hollywood, but far enough away to have some fun.”

Areas that have been utilized throughout filmmaking include everywhere from local high schools (such as Clovis West and Madera High) to the Veterans Memorial Auditorium in Downtown Fresno.

The pair of directors have done one previous film together. The project was titled Gold Fools and was a faith-centered movie. Now, the two are formulating a horror movie, which may seem like a stark contrast from their old interests.

Lofing discussed how the duo jumped between genres, and how finances affected this choice.

“We wanted something cheap,” Lofing said. “We knew that we didn’t have much money, and the horror genre fit the budget. Horror also fits well in the market place, selling well overseas.”

Lofing goes on to share how his personal background shaped his work with The Gallows.

“We thought a ‘Paranormal Activity’ style movie would be cool. The story is based on events from where I’m from [/fusion_builder_column]

[Nebraska],” Lofing said. “And when I was making my first movie project, I dabbled in horror. It has always interested me.”

Although the movie is debuting in July, it has been worked on for many years and is a long awaited project. The pair began writing the film back in 2011, and shot a promo trailer the same year. A good chunk of the movie was filmed during 2012, and now, in 2015, the crew is putting together the final pieces.

The Gallows will be released nationwide in over 2,500 theaters. Depending on the overall success of the film, Lofing and Cluff may continue down the road of filmmaking. The two may further delve into horror, or may even try their luck in the field of television.

“The Gallows has been a long road,” Cluff said. “While we have enjoyed ourselves, we are, of course, clad to wrap it up. We are not entirely sure what we are moving onto next, that really depends on how well the movie does.”

For more features, read the Feb. 12 article, Substitute teacher makes the most of her experience.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_chloemueller.

By |2015-02-20T00:00:00-07:00February 20th, 2015|Community Events, Features, Movies/TV, Uncategorized|7 Comments

FC community invited to aid Community Food Bank, Feb. 21

Screen Shot 2015-02-18 at 8.32.36 AMFresno Community Food Bank

Juliana Rosik, ’16, first purposed the project to the FC community. Rosik mentioned the idea not only because she was obligated to do so for a leadership position but because she believes that service coincides with God’s ultimate will for the body of Christ.

Leadership Student suggests idea to help the food bank

Students and their families are encouraged to offer their services at Fresno’s Community Food Bank from 7-11 a.m. as part of the organizations 10,000 Hour Volunteer-A-Thon. This event aims to complete a total of 10,000 hours of service throughout the course of four non-consecutive volunteer days: Feb. 7, Feb. 21, March 7 and March 21.

Community Food Bank has been in commission since 1992 and currently feeds over 220,000 needy San Joaquin residents a month from throughout its multiple locations in Fresno, Madera and Kings County.

Juliana Rosik, ’16, first purposed the project to the FC community. Rosik mentioned the idea not only because she was obligated to do so for a leadership position but because she believes that service coincides with God’s ultimate will for the body of Christ.

“Initially I was making this service project for a director position that I have in my leadership class,” Rosik said. “But in the end I realized that I really wanted more service projects at the school. It’s something that’s really important to me. Service is important as a Christian and also just to be a part of your community so I think giving people opportunities to serve is a really good idea.”

While at the bank, participants will aid in sorting and packaging food for the needy. This is of upmost importance considering one out of three children in the San Joaquin Valley struggle daily to find adequate nutrition.

Leadership advisor, Robert Foshee says that the Community Food Bank provides a unique and simple way to serve the people of Fresno and invite others to do so as well.

“The Community Food Bank does so much in the valley for people who don’t really have a lot of stuff and they need a lot of help to keep things running,” Foshee said. “I know Juliana has a heart for the Food Bank and so she brought it up. You can go with friends, with family. It doesn?t have to be with someone from FC. It can be anyone that you know so I think it’s just a great opportunity to give back on a day where maybe you might sleep in otherwise.”

Jenny King, ’17, plans on attending the event in order to both obtain hours for CSF and future college transcripts as well as aid the less fortunate. She encourages others to bring friends and family members.

“Well first of all I enjoy doing service projects and helping out with the community,” King said. “It’s also good because I can put it on my college transcript. I?m also doing it because it counts for CSF service hours. Also I think it will be fun to go and hang out with my friends who are going. So if you have friends that may be interested in going make sure to invite them because it will be more fun that way.”

“The Community Food Bank does so much in the valley for people who don’t really have a lot of stuff and they need a lot of help to keep things running. I know Juliana has a heart for the Food Bank and so she brought it up. You can go with friends, with family. It doesn’t have to be with someone from FC. It can be anyone that you know so I think it’s just a great opportunity to give back on a day where maybe you might sleep in otherwise.”–Robert Foshee

To become involved in the 10,000 Hour Volunteer-A-Thon, students and adults must sign the school registration sheet as well as acquire and fill out a release form by the day of the event. Individuals who do not adequately complete this procedure will not be allowed to participate in the 10,000 Hour Volunteer?A-Thon.

Fresno’s Community Food Bank is located at 3403 E. Central Ave., in southwest Fresno. For more information, contact Juliana Rosik in person or via twitter @julesrosik.

For more news, read the Feb. 13 article, Student Leadership: Serve Day approaches

Follow The Feather via Twitter and Instagram: @thefeather and @thefeatheronlilne. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @skylerklee.

By |2015-02-18T00:00:00-07:00February 18th, 2015|Community Events, Features, Leadership, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

BRIEF: Arte Americas offers culturally diverse art pieces

20150128_115058Justin Houts

Arte Americas displays paintings by famous artists.

Until Feb. 15, the Arte Americas Museum is having a one of a kind exhibit to showcase the collections of Calixto Robles, Lylia Carr and Jason Bonilla as well as many other artists. The temporary exhibit hopes to bring in new visitors to the gallery to see these new forms of unique modernism and abstract art.

Calixto Robles is an artist from Oaxaca, Mexico. In addition to being a painter, Robles also is a sculptor and print maker. Robles is a very well respected artist and has been displayed in many countries over the years. One of his biggest collectors and supporters is international Spanish rock star, Carlos Santana. Over the years Santana continually supports and promotes Robles’ art. Rebecca Caraveo, a museum curator, believes Robles’ art is a great addition to the current collection.

“Calixto Robles is an incredible artist,” Caraveo said. “I truly appreciate his art and style. It’s a great honor and privileged to have his work on display here in our museum. Hopefully people will take advantage of this opportunity to come and see his unique collection.”

Arte Americas also enjoys appreciating aspiring local artists. Another collection on display is the works of local abstract artist Lylia Forero Carr. According to Arte Americas, Carr’s recent works are mostly considered mixed media. This means that the piece of art employs more than one medium, and often combines various traditionally distinct visual art media. Her works are contemporary and bold, and provide a unique perspective on a popular art form.

Currently at the Arte Americas museum the Hallowell family, who are local philanthropists, host a temporary exhibit that is their families personal art collection. It includes paintings, sculptures, pottery and even fine antique silverware. The family enjoys collecting art on their trips to Oaxaca, Mexico. Rebecca Caraveo hopes that the community can appreciate the Hallowell collection as long as it is on display.

“It was very generous of the Hallowell family to temporarily donate their art to the museum,” Caraveo said. “We hope the community will come out and see this exhibit, as it is only here temporarily. Their collection includes all types of art from sculptures to paintings and fine handmade jewelry. It has something for everyone to see.”

Another artist on display at Arte Americas is Jason Bonilla. I personally found Bonilla’s paintings to be the highlight of the experience. My favorite piece was the painting, “Where Dreams come from.” It is very unique and original, and something that is open to individual interpretation. Some of his other works include, “Goodbye fried rice, Hello friend Chicken” and “Family Trip”.

Calixto Robles is an incredible artist. I truly appreciate his art and style. It’s a great honor and privileged to have his work on display here in our museum. Hopefully people will take advantage of this opportunity to come and see his unique collection.

Arte Americas provides a view of all sorts of art forms and styles. Their mission is to bring art to Fresno to enrich the community, and these exhibits are great opportunities to go support local and international artists.

Admission to the museum is free, however, donations are welcome and encouraged. The museum is located at 1630 Van Ness Fresno CA 93721. For any questions or concerns they can be reached at 559-266-2623.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @JustinHFeather.

For more news, read the Feb. article, BRIEF: RAK week is here, beginning Feb. 9.

By |2015-02-13T00:00:00-07:00February 13th, 2015|Community Events, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

BRIEF: Tulare hosts annual World Ag Expo

ajennyJenny King

Sophomore Jenny King gives impression to Tulare’s World Agriculture Exposition.

Annual Tulare fair showcases technology for farmers in the Central Valley

Another year of farming and dairy has begun, and for farmers it means to check out the biggest advancements and tools. Since 1968, World Ag Expo in Tulare has been in motion; starting out with 157 exhibitors and 28,000 to 100,000 attendees. Every year it continues to expand and attract more viewers.

World Ag Expo is held every year at the Tulare County Fairgrounds in Tulare, California. From all around the world, visitors come to experience different technologies and the latest equipment for farming. After years of growing popularity, the show has outgrown its grounds, leading to a shortage of space. In spite of the space shortage, the show directors decided to form an association that would establish an international agribusiness show within Tulare. This lead to the formation of International Agri-Center, Inc. The new location became the first facility in the Western United States to hold an agricultural show.

Each year, the Expo showcases the newest top ten products. This year, DairyProQ, shows off their first fully automated robotic rotary milking parlor; with this invention it changes the future for milking. The show features agricultural tours, seminars, top ten products and delicious food sponsored from different locations.

Pete DeGroot, local farmer in the Central Valley, has gone to the expo for more than 30 years. He enjoyed the time spent with family and friends and looks forward to the new technology the show displays for farmers in search of new equipment.

“The expo is a place farmers can go and see a lot of new equipment and technology in one place, which helps us make decisions when looking for new equipment,” DeGroot said. “It’s a long and tiring day, but worth the time. It is also a good time to see and meet new people and say hello to old friends. My family and I have attended for over 30 years. I took my Grandson, Blake, yesterday to educate him on what was going on in the farming and dairy world.”

The expo is a place farmers can go and see a lot of new equipment and technology in one place, which helps us make decisions when looking for new equipment. It’s a long and tiring day, but worth the time. It is also a good time to see and meet new people and say hello to old friends. My family and I have attended for over 30 years. I took my Grandson, Blake, yesterday to educate him on what was going on in the farming and dairy world.–Pete DeGroot

Popular food vendors surround the grounds, supporting local schools or non-profit organizations. Everything from barbecue tri-tip, peach cobbler to nachos are served throughout the walkways of the Expo.

The show also provides high school students scholarship for those majoring in agricultural education. E.M. Tharp and World Ag Expo have paired up to provide the “We Believe in Growing” scholarships for high school students. Two $10,000 scholarships are awarded to those who want to attend a four-year university and who major in agricultural education.

Sophomore Hannah Nale and her family go every year to the show. This year was her first year going and looks forw