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Feather on the east coast

IMG_3905Ryan King, Photographer

Feather editors gather in Times Square just before leaving to teach sessions at the Columbia Scholastic Press Association’s 91st convention, March 19.

The Feather staff poses in New York City at Times Square, before they head off to Columbia University, March 19.

In the first session of classes, Editors-in-Chief Sara Peterson and Chloe Mueller taught their own class: ‘Thriving in Cyberspace’. During the second session, Callista Fries, Media Specialist, taught another group about the ins-and-outs of podcasting. Feather editors are speaking at the 91st annual Columbia Scholastic Press Association‘s (CSPA) convention.

Stay tuned for more articles and photos as The Feather on the east coast continues.

For more photos, visit Feeling forgiveness and Econ Fair.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.

By |2015-03-19T00:00:00-07:00March 19th, 2015|Announcements, Uncategorized|0 Comments

FC Underground 2014-’15, No. 35 (VIDEO)

This is the 35th episode of “FC Underground, 2014-15,” covering the day of March 18, 2015. Senior Callista Fries is a third-year host and broadcasts the video news alone normally. FC Underground is a weekly segment hosted by Fries, the feather staff is in NY for the week and Trevor Beal will be filming and editing the video every day.

“FC Underground” first ran in the fall of 1997 and continued until the spring of 2001. In the fall of 2009, editor-in-chief Suzanna Quiring , ’10, resumed the series, which was then produced by Paige Powell, ’10. After Quiring and Powell graduated, Brooke Stobbe and David Casuga took up the job until the end the 2011-’12 school year. Now, Fries and usually junior Tim Nyberg continue the segments.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.

By |2015-03-18T00:00:00-07:00March 18th, 2015|Uncategorized, Videos 2014-15|1 Comment

Authentic Italian food offers traditional dining options

DoomanFood1Ryan King, Photographer

Feather editors ate at Il Palazzo restaurant in Little Italy. Both the food and service were wonderful and worth a visit. Ask for server Marchello.

Little Italy serves up fabulous meals at Il Palazzo

This year marks my fourth time ever traveling to New York City. Among these random trips, I have eaten at at least 40 different restaurants.

Today I had the great pleasure of partaking in the most impressive meal I have eaten in the Big Apple. Il Palazzo, in Little Italy, has made a statement in the community, as one of the most authentic and traditional restaurants around.

When first entering Il Palazzo, it appears to have a similar aura to most of other the other nearby restaurants until you reach the main dining room. With a glass rooftop revealing the nearby high-rises, and brick walls with fountains and topiaries, this place was giving off a great vibe.

Feather adviser, Greg Stobbe, has made this restaurant a annual tradition for his staff members. Stobbe asked for his favorite waiter, Marchello, by name to service our table for the afternoon.

Right away, I was impressed with not only the expediency of the service, but also the personal and welcoming touch that Marchello offered. While waiting for our food to cook, Stobbe and the other staff members engaged in conversation with Marchello, learning the about how he began his career with Il Palazzo many years ago.

Within five minutes of being seated, we were given a huge basket of various types of Italian breads and toasts along with an absolutely delicious house dipping sauce consisting of olive oil, parsley, garlic, red chili flakes and Parmesan cheese.

Two thinly cut pieces of deep fried eggplant, topped with rich marinara and a large portion of mozzarella cheese and a small serving of spaghetti on the side. I believe it was pure freshness along with the fact that it was cooked to perfection that truly made this dish. — Senior Ryan King

Five minutes after the bread was brought out, our table was given yet another complimentary appetizer. Fried zucchini with marinara dipping sauce, a dish I have never before realized to be a part of authentic Italian cuisine, satisfied the stomachs of everyone at the table.

The main course soon followed the appetizers, proving these meal no easy task to finish. I ordered the Eggplant Parmesan with the Calamari Fritti. This was fabulous Italian food.

The Eggplant Parmesan was almost breathe taking. I have tried this same dish in many other restaurants back home and I can say without a doubt that none even compare.

Two thinly cut pieces of deep fried eggplant, topped with rich marinara and a large portion of mozzarella cheese and a small serving of spaghetti on the side. I believe it was pure freshness along with the fact that it was cooked to perfection that truly made this dish.

Though it was hard to turn my fork from the eggplant, I forced myself to stop and try the Calamari Fritti. The day before we flew out of San Francisco, I dined at the famous West Coast hot spot, Scoma’s, on the San Francisco wharf. It was here that I tried there signature Calamari Fritti.

I can honestly say that it was hard for me to decide which calamari I liked more. While Scoma’s was tender and cooked perfectly, the true and fresh calamari flavor was somewhat drowned out of the meat. The calamari at Il Palazzo was a little tougher, but the flavor was exquisite. I, personally, enjoy the tough texture of calamari and therefore hold Il Palazzo’s slightly higher.

While it is normally a custom to order dessert after such a meal at a place like this, we made an exception, because it was not dinner. Our meal was concluded with a plate of fresh fruit to cleanse the palate and sooth the stomach.

If there were one thing I could have changed, I would have perhaps left out the chili flakes in all of the dipping sauces. Although I love chili flakes and personally enjoyed them, not everyone has a taste for it. I would leave the flakes on the side to let the consumer decide whether or not they want the spice added.

All in all, these meal was almost perfect. The quiet, laid back nature of the building really calmed the group, allowing for a much needed hour of relaxation. The food was top notch, the service was top notch and the atmosphere was top notch.

If you ever find yourself in desperate need of a good meal in the middle of New York City, please hear my words and try out Il Palazzo. You will not be disappointed.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @namoodnhoj.

For more reviews, read the March 10 article, Featured app: GameChanger.

By |2015-03-17T00:00:00-07:00March 17th, 2015|Food, Uncategorized|0 Comments

FC hits NY: Day 1 (SLIDESHOW, VIDEO)

IMG_6974Adviser Greg Stobbe

Nine Feather editors are traveling to NY to attend and speak at the 91st annual Columbia Scholastic Press Association’s convention. The staff arrives in Times Square ready for a night tour, March 16.

After arriving to San Francisco the night before, a total of nine journalists boarded the plane on Monday, heading to New York, March 16. Editors Rees Rogenstein, Josh Carter, Chloe Mueller, Gaby Siquiros, Ryan King, Callista Fries, Trevor Beal, John Dooman, Sara Peterson and chaperones Angie Fries and adviser Greg Stobbe arrive at the airport around 8 a.m. and will tour that evening as FC hits NY.

The Feather staff will be heading to Columbia University, for the 91st annual CSPA Spring Convention, March, 18-20. Along with being nominated for the Gold Crown by the Columbia Scholastic Press Association (CSPA), Fries, King, Peterson and Mueller will be presenting workshops during the convention. Throughout their stay, the editors will also spend two days touring Manhattan.

While at the CSPA Spring Convention, editors will be attending classes and workshops relating to journalism and school run newspapers. At the end of the Spring Convention, The Feather staff will attend the 2015 Online Digital Crown Awards ceremony, in which they will receive either a Silver or Gold crown.

After arriving in New York around, 7:30 p.m., the staff departed from the JFK airport and headed towards their home for the next week, the Hotel Edison.

Upon arrival students dropped off their luggage and headed to Juniors for a late dinner and then traveled to the subway to buy their metro passes for the week.

Students then took a quick tour of Times Square and headed back to their hotel, to work on articles, and to get some much needed rest.

EDITORS NOTE: Stay tuned for daily updates including slideshows and videos as FC hits NY.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @rynnking_.

For more news, read the March 13 article, Blood Drive honors FC alumna currently in recovery.

Childrens Hospital drives central Valley volunteers (UPDATE, VIDEO, SLIDESHOW, PODCAST)

KidsDay1Kylie Bell

Feather adviser Greg Stobbe hawks special edition Kids Day newspapers with Fresno Mayor Ashley Swearengin, March 3.

Feather staff joins student leadership to hawk special Fresno Bee Kids Day papers

UPDATE: March. 11
After an estimate was given, March 3, for Kids Day, Valley Children’s Hospital was able to count the remainder of the money raised with a total of $535,000. Last year’s Kids Day reached a total of $480,000, which set a record for future fundraising. While this is not the total final count, Children’s Hospital has passed the goal for this year’s Kids Day reaching over the estimated $530,000.

Each year, the community, Fresno Bee and ABC 30 all join forces to earn money for the patients of Valley Children’s Hospital. For the 28th time, Kids Day has encouraged hundreds of individuals to take time selling special edition Fresno Bee newspapers across the San Joaquin Valley to earn the money to help the cause, March 3.

Community members and campus students including notable figures and organizations from Mayor Ashley Swearengin, Police Chief Jerry Dyer, and Fresno State football coach Tim DeRuyter to student leadership and publications from FC.

This year, according to the Fresno Bee: an estimated amount of $340,500 and counting, has been provided at the time of 5 p.m., March 3. Children’s Hospital spokeswoman Zara Arboleda has stated this year’s goal of $530,000 is reachable.

Since last year, Children’s Hospital has received over $6.3 million in donations throughout the course of its 28 year history. This year they hope to pass $7 million in an even greater effort to support the patients of the Madera County hospital.

Celebrity corner encourages notable figures from the community to volunteer

With the increase of involvement of a local whose who, Kids Day volunteers have deemed the corner of Blackstone and Shaw “celebrity corner”. Many notable figures from the community, as well as ABC 30 and the Fresno Bee, have used this corner to sell their newspapers for the last seven to eight years.

From the start of Kids Day, Fresno Bee has partnered with Valley Children’s Hospital. Each year they prepare these special edition newspapers for hundreds of individuals to sell. Fresno Bee Executive Editor Jim Boren has been apart of Kids Day since it’s beginnings. He really enjoys the chance the chance to help raise money for the hospital and thinks of the event as a symbol for the community.

“Well, Kids Day for one, raises a lot of money for the hospital, and does a lot of good things, but it’s also a symbolism of how important Valley Children’s Hospital is to our community,” Boren said. “This is a hospital that really cares for kids almost all of us have had either a child or a relative who has gone through that hospital and it does great work and we are just out here to help.”

Boren adds that the vision of Kids Day is expanding through the years. Along with just Fresno, efforts have been raised all across the San Joaquin Valley, including cities like Visalia and the youth of the community.

“More and more people are getting involved, we expanded across the Valley,” Boren said. “Visalia is a huge part of Kids Day, they do great work down their, especially in the high schools. So it’s expanded. This hospital has served the entire San Joaquin Valley and over the central coast, so it is an important part of the whole region.”

I have never been to this (Kids Day), and so it’s really nice seeing all these people trying to support us. Think about it this way: you are going to save a life, just by a dollar, you know, maybe fifty cents. You could spend five, ten dollars on something else, something you don’t even use. So you can make a difference with just a little bit of money. –-Juan Mendez, father of Neymar Mendez, 2015 Kids Day ambassador child

ABC 30 has also partnered with Children’s Hospital, along with the Fresno Bee, to broadcast Kids Day all day long, promoting the event. ABC 30 news reporter Amanda Venegas has estimated the volunteers of the event to over 5,000. Using the hashtag #KidsDay2015, people could promote over social media, which Venegas thinks has helped the event.

“If I could have all of our reporters out showcasing the different locations that would be really neat,” Venegas said. “But we just showcase different areas of Fresno that we can make it out to. Besides the dozens of people you see here, there is about 5,300 volunteers all over the County, like in Visalia and Merced. There is people even in the Oakhurst area that are selling newspapers right now that you don’t see. And I think social media has been huge because we can actually see what people are doing and we don’t have to be there.”

Valley Children’s Hospital Ambassador Family was able to come to support Kids Day and encourage others to donate to the cause. Juan Mendez, father of Neymar Mendez, the ambassador child, was excited to see the involvement the community offered during Kids Day and the chance to see others give their time and money for the cause.

“I have never been to this (Kids Day), and so it’s really nice seeing all these people trying to support us,” Mendez said. “Think about it this way: you are going to save a life, just by a dollar, you know, maybe fifty cents. You could spend five, ten dollars on something else, something you don’t even use. So you can make a difference with just a little bit of money.”

President and CEO of Valley Children’s Hospital Todd Suntrapak echoes Mendez’ sentiments.

President and CEO of Valley Children’s Hospital Todd Suntrapak, who was born and raised in Fresno, participated in Kids Day as well. As once a patient of Children’s Hospital, Suntrapak thinks of this event as a way to help out the children of the San Joaquin Valley.

“It’s the least I can do to take my time and come out here and thank all the terrific volunteers that are working on our behalf today,” Suntrapak said. “But more importantly on behalf of making kids well, I mean really, that’s what essentially is happening here. All these volunteers are donating their time and selling papers in partnership with ABC 30 and the Fresno Bee at the end to really a child. It’s my pleasure to be here; I wouldn’t miss it.”

Mayor Ashley Swearengin has been selling newspapers on ‘celebrity corner’ since it’s start. With other notable figures, Swearengin adds that it all comes back to help the patients.

“Every year it just gets more and more exciting,” Swearengin said. “More and more people are here, we have students from Fresno State and athletic coaches. We’ve got our law enforcement leaders other elected officials and people are out here for the same reason: to help Childrens Hospital.”

Campus works with San Joaquin Valley to sell newspapers

Student leadership, began selling newspaper at a dim and chilly 4 a.m., along with The Feather staff who came just about 45 minutes later to corners at Alluvial and Cedar as well as Cedar and Alluvial. For several years now both campus clubs have participated in Kids Day to help Valley Children’s Hospital.

With a total amount of 980 newspapers sold, campus representatives were able to contribute $1,954.13 to the cause. Students were able to sell all the way till 9 a.m., where they then headed to their classes for the day.

Senior John Dooman has been participating in Kids Day for three years. While he did not sell as many newspapers as he expected, selling one encouraged him to appreciate his time during the day.

“This year I was a little late waking up, but I was glad that I could make it to Kids Day,” Dooman said. “Even though I didn’t sell a crazy amount of newspapers, the chance to even sell one is enough to help a child in need. No matter how early it was, I’m happy I went.”

Freshman Jaden Ventura has never been part of Kids Day till this year. As a member of The Feather he was able to be encouraged by the community around him as they donated thousands of dollars to the cause.

“I remember that I was on the corner and someone gave $20 for a paper and it made me realize that people really do care about Kids Day,” Ventura said. “Being able to help be apart of such a noble cause really made the entire day worth it.”

Opinions Editor Rees Roggenstein, also contributed to this article.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @rynnking_.

For more on Kids Day 2015, read the Fresno Bee articles, A look back at Kids Day 2015: from celebrity corner to students in Oakhurst and Fresno’s Mendez family stays strong despite child’s medical battles.

For more features, read the March 3 article, WWII Veteran receives long awaited medal.

Social media promotes scholastic journalism awareness (STORIFY)

StaffSJW15Twitter and Storify illustration

The Feather Online is participating in Scholastic Journalism Week, Feb. 22-28. The staff will also participate, follow the Hashtag #SJW2015.

With National Scholastic Journalism Week, sponsored by the Journalism Education Association (JEA), mass media has been seen on Twitter and Instagram with the hashtag #SJW2015. Throughout the week, students posted on social media in an effect to promote Journalism Education, Feb. 22-28.

The organization encourages student journalists to raise awareness, promoting its significance to the community. The event was geared towards those apart of a educational journalism program, community members, including readers and students, to spread awareness.

National Scholastic Journalism Week was created for the support of the First Amendment which states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

Throughout the week, The Feather watched both medias, by creating the hashtag: #FCJW as well as the original #SJW2015. Approximately 100 posts were involved with the hashtag throughout Instagram as well as Twitter.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.

For more on National Scholastic Journalism Week, read the Feb. 23 articles, BRIEF: Scholastic Journalism Week, Feb. 22-28 (VIDEO), and Scholastic Journalism Week 2015: Join the discussion.

For more news, read the March 2 article, BRIEF: Leadership, journalism students to attend Kids Day, March 3.

By |2015-03-02T00:00:00-07:00March 2nd, 2015|Announcements, FC Arts, FC Events, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Scholastic Journalism Week 2015: Join the discussion

StaffSJWJeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

As The Feather has been headlining student events, featuring stories about Homecoming, issues of social equality and the sport season beginnings, this week the tables are reversed. To promote the importance of school publications, the Journalism Education Association (JEA) has sponsored the annual Scholastic Journalism Week, Feb. 22-28.

The organization encourages student journalists to raise awareness, promoting its significance to the community. Along with a student created poster template, the JEA has listed several ideas for student and publication adviser participants.

While the event is geared towards those apart of a educational journalism program, community members, including readers and students can get involved. Throughout the week, The Feather will be watching social media including Twitter and Instagram, by creating a hashtag: #FCJW as well as #SJW2015 which will appear in a Storify collection.

National Scholastic Journalism Week was created for the support of the First Amendment which states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

Responses from staff writers, editors and advisers, were documented in order to highlight the significance of journalism education not just nationwide, but locally.

The Feather wants to encourage students and readers to submit their opinions in the comment section on the effects of journalism and why seeking out and reporting the news is important. Please consider adding to or joining Scholastic Journalism Week 2015: Join the discussion.

Relevance of the world
Emily Ladd, ’16
Feb. 27, 2015

“What’s going on in the world is extremely relevant, especially seeing as everyone lives in it. Journalists and people alike should seek news, but journalists make what’s important known and more accessible to everyone, finding all facts they can. Journalism raises awareness for the events around us.”

Freedom of speech: A beautiful gift
Rees Roggenstein, ’16
Feb. 27, 2015

“Scholastic Journalism Week is incredibly important, and not just to journalists and those involved with media. It exemplifies the right to freedom of speech that we as Americans have been afforded, which is a gift that is not freely given. It is a time to express one’s opinion in complete and brutal honesty. It is a time to truly express one’s freedom of speech. This is a week that all who practice freedom of speech can celebrate such a beautiful gift.”

Epitome of student journalism
Kathryn Damschen, ’15
Feb. 27, 2015

“Scholastic Journalism Week is the epitome of student journalism. It is a week solely dedicated to the media, news, and information that we gather each and every day. I personally believe it is a great endeavor to be a part of, as it brings awareness to what we do as a whole (being a part of a journalism staff). It is critical to be knowledgable of the work you do and why you’re apart of such a ting, if anything. My thoughts are, what good is doing something if you don’t know what it is or why you’re doing it?”

News 24/7
Michael Fu, ’16
Feb. 27, 2015

“The importance of journalist went out to seek the new and report it is because without the motivation to seek the news or to report them. The society has no way other than having the eye witness the even that happened in front of them to discovered the things happen in school, town or the whole nation. The journalist who seek the news allow the people to connect each other and form a bobble where everyone know what is going on in this very moment. Without the journalist, the people have to look for the news 24/7 by themselves in order to keep up with the world. As a conclusion, we as a journalist who seek the news and report them allows others to be aware of things happened around them and bring the community closer than it was before.”

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StaffSJW15Jeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

 

Face and fix society
Toby Pan, ’15
Feb. 27, 2015

“America is not the only country that have the freedom of speech stated in the Constitution, but it is one of the few countries that have this important right widely applied to their people on a daily basis. Unlike some of the countries whose media industries are controlled by the government, the journalists here are endowed with considerable freedom to express their own opinions. On top of that, the journalists’ good work ensured that the public are informed of what’s happening domestically and globally; so that Americans, although have made a lot of mistakes, can always face and fix their society on time.”

Spreading the Word
Chloe Mueller, Editor-in-Chief
Feb. 26, 2015

“On campus, I don’t think journalism is viewed as relative to the lives of students unless they are directly involved with the class. This week gives us – as journalists – a chance to spread the word and importance of journalism to our classmates who don’t prioritize it.”

Exposing the Truth
Justin Houts, Writer
Feb. 26, 2015

“It’s important for journalists to seek the news and report it; by doing so we can insure that our rights and enforce rules and laws. It’s news reporting that exposed Watergate, the Clinton scandal, and many other historical events that wouldn’t have otherwise been made known had they not been exposed by journalists. The U.S. is one of the few countries that allows it’s citizens to speak freely about their beliefs and ideas, and if we don’t use this opportunity to the fullest potential its being wasted and not taken as the privilege it truly is.”

Week of opportunities
Olivia Quebe, ’16
Feb. 23, 2015

“I see Scholastic Journalism Week as an opportunity to make people aware of the importance of journalism. It is a way to get the students involved and informed not only during this week, but for the rest of the year. I’m excited to see the responses of the students and special events to come.”

Educate ourselves
Trevor Beal, News Editor
Feb. 23, 2015

“In my opinion it is important for journalists of all ages to seek out the real news because without that key characteristic we risk becoming mindless believers of mass media. Our job is to educate ourselves and others in current affairs and how we are affected by them.”

Its a big deal
Sydney Belmont, ’17
Feb. 23, 2015

“Scholastic Journalism Week is a huge deal. Students are encouraged to promote journalism. It is a way to get the student body involved and informed about what is going on during the week. I am looking forward to all the excitement involved in this week.”

Journalism happenings
Natalia Torres, ’16
Feb. 23, 2015

“Scholastic Journalism week is the week to promote journalism. Students who are already in journalism should be informing others about what journalism is about and about joining journalism. This way the student body can be updated on what events are happening as they are happening.”

A journalist’s perspective
John Dooman, Reviews Editor
Feb. 23, 2015

“Every journalists needs to report on certain stories to provide their own take on it. Two journalists would report a story in their own way from their own, unique point of view. This allows readers and/or viewers to come to their own conclusions on how news is covered.”

Club recognition
Jenny King, ’17
Feb. 23, 2015

“Scholastic Journalism Week is really exciting; as a club on the campus, this week is a recognition of the hard work that the staff puts in. It’s a fun way for students and staffers to be involved in their school newspaper.”

Effective reporting
Sara Peterson, Editor-in-Chief
Feb. 23, 2015

“Journalists need to report because it gives themselves and people around them insight into what is happening locally or in the world. Our job as journalist is to effectively report and share these stories with our fellow man.”

Think, Engage, Teach
Greg Stobbe, Publications Adviser
Feb. 23, 2015

“Journalists, and I’m being inclusive of Feather reporters, have an obligation to seek out and report the news, profiles, stories and issues that are important to their constituencies {peers} and community. This is an obligation, not whether they ‘feel like it.’ The Feather staff in particular is charged to present to the greater Fresno community who Fresno Christian citizens are and represent them. The journalists on this campus need to bear witness and independently write and comment on the news and the controversies, its peoples’ failures and success, struggles and the stories of overcoming, calling into question when peers are not morally or ethically responsible and report the accomplishments and/or consequences. The Feather staff must give fair, accurate perspective to the goings on, in and around the Fresno Christian community. They are not just to watch but to stimulate conversation so as to engage fellow students to listen, dialogue and act on truth so that the community not only knows it but also uses it in relationship. Think responsible. Be engaged. Teach the tools of citizenship.”

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @rynnking_.

For more features, read the Feb. 20 article, Fresno hosts horror movie, to be released nationally.

By |2015-02-23T00:00:00-07:00February 23rd, 2015|Community Events, FC Arts, Features, Uncategorized|1 Comment

Jack Hannah visits FC (VIDEO)

Local singer Jack Hannah, Sons of the San Joaquin fame, visited Amy Witters’ kindergarten class. The local celebrity celebrated with song as the cowboy/girl dressed class sang and interacted with him throughout a special assembly, Jan. 16.

The Western Music Association’s Songwriter of the Year multiple award-winner is a former teacher and his television appearances include the Grand Ole Opry, Austin City Limits, Nashville Now, American Music Shop, Prime-Time Country and Old Time Country Music.

He taught the class some of his favorite songs including “Read, Write, and Recite.” He ended his hour showing everyone how to yodel.

Kindergarden teacher, Amy Witters, thoroughly enjoyed the time that was spent with Jack Hannah.

“What a rip-roaring time we had with Cowboy Jack! Thank you, Mr. Richards, for inviting him, they went to Sunday School together. “Witters said. “The Kindergarten cowboys/cowgirls learned all about ‘life on the range,’ and some new cowboy songs too!”

By |2015-01-20T00:00:00-07:00January 20th, 2015|Uncategorized, Videos, Videos 2014-15|0 Comments

Student sleep triggers attentiveness, learning

SleepJeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

With the crazy schedules high schoolers have, its often difficult to find a resting period in between the week or even the weekend. Some only survive on the minimum amount and therefore struggle to survive throughout the rest of the next day.

This is not just a problem at one school, but everywhere, including all genders and ages. Sometimes the problem can be so severe that doctors will diagnose patients with insomnia. This medical condition can be triggered by stress, bad habits or even another medical issue.

According to WebMD, the approximate amount of sleep, based on age, for teenagers on average is about 8.5 to 9.5 hours. Now that is based on the fact that these teenagers have been getting a right amount of sleep previously.

The human body needs to replenish itself each day in order to function. If a person is not getting the right amount of sleep he/she’s body will need to get additional amount of hours according to the ones they missed.

Along the line of sleep deprivation, symptoms can cause memory problems, depression, weakening of an immune system and increase of pain. The lack of sleep can trigger many emotional problems and bodily hazards.

Sleeping in a cold environment provides an easier temperature drop in the body, making it easier to fall asleep. Bodies will usually drop in temperature when a person doses off.

Senior Nick Morrison describes his sleep during the week at best okay. Most of the time he is either on his phone at night or doing homework.

“Usually I get distracted on my phone and then the time kind of flies by,” Morrison said. “I kind of feel that I get the most sleep when I don’t have my phone on at night, but that doesn’t really happen too much. Besides that I don’t feel that tired in the morning and I can wake up pretty easily.”

Many times students will sleep with their devices causing them to get distracted with sounds or bright lights, preventing sleep. WebMD recommends that individuals should turn off electronics and try to stick to a schedule for going to bed and waking up, whether it is a weekday or the weekend.

Sophomore Trevor Trevino agrees that sleep is important to survive during the hectic week. Even with that, he still has trouble initially falling asleep.

“Most of time I feel rested, but sometimes it’s hard to actually fall asleep,” Trevino said. “With such a crazy week sometimes I just sleep the most on the weekends.”

Brooke Wood struggles to find the time to sleep. With a busy schedule she finds it easier sometimes sleeping the most on breaks or the weekends.

“I get like 6 hours of sleep,” Wood said. “I’m always tired and school is always so time consuming that I don’t usually have time to sleep a lot during the week. I basically hibernate during the breaks or summer vacation.”

Senior Andrew Hindes sleep routine is similar to Woode’s. Sleeping the most on the weekend helps restore his body of sleep deprived days during the week.

“On the weekend I usually wake up around 2 p.m., with about 12 hours of sleep,” Hindes said. “But on the week days I get about half that. On the weekdays it is a lot harder to wake up in the morning and it’s often a struggle. On the weekday I will press snooze for an average of 45 minutes to an hour.”

Junior Emmaline Krohn, tries to get the most amount of sleep during the week as possible. She finds that it helps her pay attention in class and during the day.

“Well I have track practice after the school day is over and I’m usually already tired from the day to day activities, so I try to finish my homework and go to bed. Most people are om their phone at night, but I think that it’s better to just turn off all your electronics so that you can actually fall asleep.”

Follow The Feather via Twitter and Instagram: @thefeather and @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @rynnking_.

For more features, read the Jan. 9 article, January, thank you month: Join the Discussion.

By |2015-01-13T00:00:00-07:00January 13th, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

FC Underground 2014-15, No. 19 (VIDEO)

Screen Shot 2014-11-19 at 9.50.09 AMJeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

FC Underground is a weekly campus news Vlog post hosted by senior Callista Fries to keep Fresno Christian High students aware of upcoming events.

This is the 19th episode of “FC Underground, 2014-15,” covering the week of Nov. 17-21, 2014. Senior Callista Fries is a third year host and broadcasts the video news alone. FC Underground is a weekly segment hosted by Fries, filmed and produced by junior videographer Tim Nyberg.

Lunch Schedule:
Mon: No Lunch
Tues: No Lunch
Wed: No Lunch
Thurs: Teriyaki Don
Fri: No Lunch

Is creative writing something you want to develop? Join other JH/HS Creative Writers in the Creative Writing Club that meets Mondays in room 603 at lunch.

On Mon. the 16th it is the Fall Sports Award Banquet in the Student Ministries Center, start at 7:00 p.m.

Are you having trouble with writing that essay paper or any other paper for that matter. We have help for you, on Tues. and Thurs. in room 624 from 3-4:30. A writing lab to help you get those writing assignments done. Take advantage of this opportunity, it is here until December 11.

The Fall Festivus is happening again! The cost is $10, it will be held at the Beal’s house on Nov. 25, starting at 6:30 p.m.

Together we Can is undergo, bring canned food to the HS office, it is going on until the Dec. 9.

Please use the hashtag #FCGiveThanks when reposting or celebrating how others are thankful or giving back to their community.

Be sure to check out the Feather Photo section as new photos will be posted throughout the day to promote homecoming activities and those who are engaged with school spirit. Additionally, be sure to read The Feather’s Daily News section to read the announcements for the week. They are added to each day, promoting school, community, and other news.

For these and other events, read The Feather Online announcements at the Daily News on the right menu bar. The FC Underground segments consist of news, interviews, profiles and comments on campus life. Each episode is between two and three minutes in length.

“FC Underground” first ran in the fall of 1997 and continued until the spring of 2001. In the fall of 2009, editor-in-chief Suzanna Quiring , ’10, resumed the series, which was then produced by Paige Powell, ’10. After Quiring and Powell graduated, Brooke Stobbe and David Casuga took up the job until the end the 2011-’12 school year. Now, Fries and usually junior Tim Nyberg have continued the segments.

By |2014-11-18T00:00:00-07:00November 18th, 2014|Uncategorized, Videos 2014-15|1 Comment

95th Annual Veterans Day Parade (VIDEO)

VeteransDayParade1Jeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

The Fresno Veterans Day Parade is known to be the largest parade west of the Mississippi river, and this year’s 95th annual presentation did not disappoint.

The Fresno Veterans Day Parade is known to be the largest parade west of the Mississippi river, and this year’s 95th annual presentation did not disappoint. Over 200 entrees and 10,000 participants snaked throughout Downtown Fresno with over 20,000 spectators, honoring those who served our country, Nov. 11.

This year’s special honorees were those veterans who served in the Coast Guard and Korean War, along with WWI, WWII and Vietnam. Many different organizations paraded with the veterans as well as countless schools throughout Fresno county.

The 95th Annual Veterans Day Parade began with opening ceremonies beginning at 10:30 a.m. in front of City Hall with many bystanders. The ceremonies included the 21-gun salute, singing the National Anthem and releasing of white doves. With help from The Fresno area Coast Guard auxiliary, Flotilla 10-5, Coast Guard Capt. Edward A. Westfall, a commanding officer based in San Diego, was this year’s Grand Marshall. Shortly following opening ceremonies, Fresno State Marching Band opened the parade.

For more media, watch the Nov. 15 video, National Kindness Day, Nov. 13, 2014 (VIDEO).

By |2014-11-17T00:00:00-07:00November 17th, 2014|Community Events, Features, Uncategorized, Videos|0 Comments

National Kindness Day, Nov. 13, 2014 (VIDEO)

NationalKindnessDay1Feather screenshot

World Kindness Week is a week that encourages people to do at least one random act of kindness during the week.

Campus students also celebrate National Kindness Day.

World Kindness Week is a week that encourages people to do at least one random act of kindness during the week. World Kindness Week is all next week (Nov. 9- Nov. 15).

World Kindness Day was born when a collection of humanitarian groups came together on Nov. 13, 1997, and made a “Declaration of Kindness.” Likewise, on Kindness Day everyone is encouraged to make a similar declaration.

Donating books, food or clothes to your local community is a great way to celebrate. However, pledging to commit just one act of kindness is no less worthwhile: hold the door open for a stranger, let your sibling have control of the TV remote for the evening.

Val Rivera has already shown acts of kindness to Greg Stobbe and Robert Foshee by presenting them with a bouquet of flowers. A random act of kindness could be as simple as this, giving someone you appreciate a gift.

Another way to participate in World Kindness Week is to be actively involved with a local serve project. This could include serving at an old folks’ home, packing medical supplies, feeding the homeless, donating to the church or charity, helping build houses for those who need it or even working in a soup kitchen.

Being active in a local serve project is easier to keep up with than a normal act of kindness, even though both are completely acceptable. So rather than paying for someone else?s coffee, you could give the money you would have used to a charity or to your church or buy a meal for a homeless person.

Our goal this week at FC is to spread the word about this holiday, and encourage students to become actively involved in giving thanks and showing random acts of kindness. Help us spread the word by hashtagging related photos or tweets with #FCGiveThanks. Remember to give thanks this World Kindness Week, and spread the word about his holiday.

For more media, watch the Nov. 12 video, FC Underground 2014-15, No. 18 (VIDEO).

By |2014-11-15T00:00:00-07:00November 15th, 2014|FC Events, Uncategorized, Videos|1 Comment

Almunus suffers ulcerative colitis, finds natural remedies

Spencer2Spencer Lee

Alumnas Spencer Lee speaks about his ailment and discovery of natural remedies.

Alumnus Spencer Lee, ’10, graduated from Biola University and now attends Fresno State in the physical therapy school.

College life was all fun and games until the spring of 2013. It was at that time, during the concluding months of my sophomore year at Biola, that I developed severe ulcerative colitis, a devastating autoimmune disease that attacks the large intestine.

My main side effects included a daily dose of intense abdominal cramps, extreme fatigue, 12-15 episodes of diarrhea and chronic lightheadedness. A colonoscopy found hundreds of bleeding ulcers in the large intestine, and I was left devastated.

Throughout the acute phase of my illness, my mom provided a huge support base to me and frantically searched for solutions by investigating online articles, books, magazines and talking to various healthcare professionals and other individuals with ulcerative colitis. We knew the disease affected the digestive system, thus it seemed obvious that I needed to change my diet.

Two different diet plans, both of which recommended high animal protein and low carbohydrate intake, failed to improve my health condition. Frustrated and in extreme pain, I visited my doctor and demanded that he provide stronger medication to suppress my uncontrolled colitis symptoms. He promptly recommended an immunoglobulin intravenous (IGIV) treatment known as Remicade, which is administered via an IV for 3 hours once every 2 months.

Remicade proved to be very effective, and allowed me to return to Biola for the fall 2013 semester. However, the drug came with side effects of its own, among which were a heavily suppressed immune system, lethargy, bloating, and increased appetite. In addition, long term exposure to Remicade drastically increases the risk of colon cancer.

I returned to school that fall, and began eating in the cafeteria again. My appetite was so stimulated by the medication that my regular breakfast would consist of 4-5 eggs with cheese, 2 large pieces of sourdough toast with butter and jam, 2 pieces of bacon, 2 sausage patties, a heap of hash browns, a side of ketchup, and a glass of orange juice.

After nearly a year on the medication, my condition was stable but still I did not feel optimal. In May 2013, I developed an allergic reaction to Remicade and began to break out in hives each time I received the treatment.

In order to combat the reaction, my doctor switched me over to a different medication, Humira. This drug worked similarly to Remicade, the main difference being I was able to administer it myself by injecting it into my thigh once every two weeks. On the downside, Humira was very expensive and quite painful as well.

One night, as I went to inject myself, I was especially nervous of the pain it would cause. I placed the shot on my thigh, but withdrew it out of fear. However, my hand was still on the trigger, and I accidentally shot it on the floor instead of into my leg.

At that moment, a life-changing realization occurred. It was as if a light bulb went off in my mind, and I immediately knew I had to get off this drug.

During the fall of 2014, my mom had been constantly emailing me articles and videos showing the healing effects of a whole foods plant-based diet, a way of eating that she had recently adopted. This diet entails a steady menu of whole, unrefined, and minimally processed foods such as fruit, vegetables, rice and other grains, beans, potatoes, nuts and seeds, oatmeal and tofu.

A whole food plant-based diet discourages the consumption of animal products of any kind including chicken, fish, eggs, and dairy products. To top it all off, refined foods such as salt, oil, sugar, and bleached flour are not recommended on this diet.

Not being one to do things half-heartedly, I switched my diet completely, without a transition phase, on Nov. 1, 2013. What happened next astonished me.

Over the course of the next several months I began to feel better than ever as my symptoms all but disappeared. My body composition drastically changed for the better, my energy levels increased significantly, and I felt invigorated and renewed.

In April of this year, I began to feel so good that I called my doctor and told him I had decided to discontinue my medication. He was fiercely opposed to the idea and told me that I needed to stay on it for the rest of my life. However, I went off Humira anyway, which greatly improved my immune system, provided me with extra energy, saved me a large sum of money in medical expenses, and most importantly drastically reduced the long-term risk of colon cancer.

Since going off Humira in April, I am still symptom free and thriving. This past summer, I cycled 75 miles per week, rock climbed 3-4 times per week, lifted weights nearly every day, frequently went hiking, and played regular games of pickup basketball.

In addition, since going off the medication, I have climbed Mt. Whitney in the Inyo National Forest (which at 14,505? is the highest point in the continental United States), and also Half Dome (16 miles roundtrip) and El Capitan (17 miles roundtrip) in Yosemite National Park. This type of activity level is essentially unheard of for ulcerative colitis patients, many of whom struggle just to leave their homes.

If any doubters still remain as to the healing effects of a whole foods plant-based diet, consider this: ulcerative colitis is aggravated by stress due to the vast central nervous system innervation of the large intestine. Despite this, I am currently over a month into physical therapy school at Fresno State, and am carrying a 19-unit load, while still feeling great.

My illness and recovery inspired me to earn a certification in Plant-based Nutrition from Cornell University (Ithaca, NY), and I desire to inspire and educate others who are struggling with ulcerative colitis and other debilitating diseases such as heart disease cancer, diabetes, and many other ailments. Chronic disease is preventable, and a better quality of life is just a diet-change away.

Follow The Feather via Twitter: @thefeather.

For more opinions, read the Nov. 7 column, COLUMN: Past iniquities influence the future

By |2014-11-13T00:00:00-07:00November 13th, 2014|Opinions, Uncategorized|0 Comments

BREAKING: CSPA names Feather Gold Crown Finalist

IMG_4706 (1)Tynin Fries

Last year, editor Viviana Hinojosa and The Feather staff won the CSPA Gold Crown. This year The Feather Online is a finalist.

For the 7th year in a row, Columbia Scholastic Press Association at Columbia University in New York City, has named The Feather Online as one of the 2015 Digital Media Gold Crown Finalist, Nov. 10. Nominees of the Digital Media Crowns are considered the best examples of scholastic media in the United States.

Over 1,400 digital newspapers were eligible for the award which honors the top papers in the country, regardless of size, division or state.

The Feather is one of 14 online newspapers named in the Digital Publications category as a Gold Crown Finalist nomination. Other nominees around the country include: The Clarion, FHNToday.com, Inklingsnews.com, King Street Chronicle, Livewire, My Jag News, Southwestshadow.com, The Chant, The Eagle’s Tale Online, The Foothill Dragon Press, The Paly Voice, The Pride Online, The Red Ledger and The Rider Online.

The CSPA awards its finalists with either a Silver Crown or to distinguished medias, a Gold Crown at the CSPA’s 91st annual Spring Scholastic Convention, March 18-20, 2015. Other categories which the CSPA nominates, along with Digital Publications, such as Yearbook, Magazine, Print or Hybrid are also selected as crown finalists during the year.

Last year, The Feather received an All-American critique from the National Scholastic Press Association (NSPA) and a CSPA Gold Crown.

Editor-in-Chief Sara Peterson, ’15, was hesitant about this year’s staff participation, but surprised by the outcome.

“At the beginning of the year I wasn’t sure about how we were going to do because we have a whole new editorial staff,” Peterson said. “After becoming familiar with the staff and duties this year, I’m confident in our abilities.”

Editor-in-Chief Chloe Mueller, ’16, feels excited that the staff’s effort has been effective.

“I was so thrilled to hear the news that we got nominated for this award,” Mueller said. “After a semester of stress, it’s nice to see that all of our hard work is paying off.”

Senior Editor Ryan King was elated after hearing the news and motivated by the staff to keep up the momentum while facing the challenges this year has offered.

“I’m really proud of our staff this year,” King said. “We have worked hard and I’m excited to see what is to come. With an inexperienced staff it may seem difficult to produce as much as past years, but the challenge has proven to be an opportunity for staffers to work harder through the obstacles in front of us.”

A number of editors and adviser Greg Stobbe are planning a trip to New York City, where they will attend the CSPA conference and await the announcement of Crown awards in mid-March. They hope to receive an annual critique from CSPA. Please return to this article for an update.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather and Instagram @thefeatheronline.

For more news, read the Nov. 10 article, BRIEF: 95th Annual Veterans Day Parade honors Coast Guard, Nov. 11.

By |2014-11-12T00:00:00-07:00November 12th, 2014|Academics, Feather Staff, News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Rally sets the stage for 30th homecoming game (PODCAST, VIDEO)

IMG_7983Jeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

At the end of the day, campus students and teachers alike headed to the FC gym, to wrap up the week with a rally. With the the 30th annual homecoming game against Northwest Christian High School, student leadership organized the rally to celebrate the week’s festivities and pump the campus up, Oct. 31.

From ‘Merica Monday to Fly together Friday, throughout the entire week of homecoming, students participated in dress up days, to show their spirit. Being Fly together Friday students and faculty dressed in spirit attire and FC colors during the rally.

Student leadership worked to improve and revamp this year’s homecoming game. Using this years rally, ASB will encourage students to get pumped up for the game tonight with games and cheers. In the end the seniors won this year’s homecoming rally.

Junior Juliana Rosik and member of student leadership was impressed by the motivation and participation in this year’s campus.

“I think that the class competition definitely motivated people to dress up this week,” Rosik said. “There’s a huge margin between people this year and last year who dressed up. Dress up day is mainly for the campus to have fun and get people ready for homecoming week. Dressing up on school days makes it extra special. This week is unique and extra special for all us.”

Varsity cheer started off by teaching individual cheers to students in each class, sectioned off on the bleachers. Cheers were meant pump students up and promote the game. Sophomore Michael Gibson enjoyed getting to know the cheers during the rally.

“I think everyone did really well at cheering,” Gibson said. “It sort of prepared us for homecoming. Even thought the sophomores lost, I still enjoyed the class competition and the rally as a whole.”

Junior Gillian Rea appreciated how the rally went and hopes to see more like today’s in the future.

“The rally was really exciting and it got everyone pumped up and enthusiastic about tonight,” Rea said. “It really makes me feel good that my entire class and this school are supporting each other and it’s real sense of family that comes through it.”

Classes will also show off their float correlating with the theme of homecoming, using Hollywood movie genres. The seniors will display a western-theme, while the juniors will present a Roaring 20s themed float. The sophomores will provide a 1940s mafia scene theme and the freshmen combined Star Wars and Star Trek idea creating a sci-fi theme for the night.

Senior Trevor Beal hosted the senior class float for the first time this year. Beal’s class was the first float to arrive on the campus, which gave him an opportunity to see the rest of the floats afterwards.

“Compared to passed years, float building for our class has been pretty successful,” Beal said. “The other classes pulled their floats up today and our’s {senior float} is on a completely different level. I’m waiting for half time to see our class win homecoming”

Senior Andrew Guthrie will be playing in the band during the game as well as participating in his float during half time. With the added pressures Guthrie still is excited to be apart of the event this year.

“This game is special because all week we have been practicing for the game,” Guthrie said. “I am going to be on the float as well as in the band so it’s going to be a lot of work, but worth it. We {band} are going to get everyone pumped up with some classic oldies like ‘Smoke on the Water’ and others that students know.”

2014 homecoming involvement (PODCAST) —

Junior Claire Kollenkark and also member of student leadership was encouraged by the effort and participation students gave during the rally even though her class was not named the winner.

“Everyone was super pumped and got into it {rally},” Kollenkark said. “Even though the juniors did not win I was happy that the Seniors won. The purpose of this rally was to pump people up for homecoming. It was extremely loud and one of the best rallies we have had all year.”

As the game starts, homecoming events of the night like court nominations and floats will focus around the topic of Hollywood, with the official theme, ‘A walk down Hollywood Blvd’. The actual game will start at 7 p.m., on the varsity field, but the festivities will commence at 6:30 p.m., starting off with the introduction of the freshman, sophomore and junior princess nominees.

Follow The Feather via Twitter: @thefeather and Instagram: @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_rynnking.

For more on homecoming, read the Oct. 31 article, STORIFY: 30th homecoming begins #FCgoesHollywood. For more features, read the Oct. 30 article, King nominees bust a move (VIDEO).

By |2014-10-31T00:00:00-07:00October 31st, 2014|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

STORIFY: 30th homecoming begins #FCgoesHollywood

Storify3Amy Deffenbacher | The Feather Online Archive

With the start of the 30th annual homecoming week, FC is set to host an event each day that all students can participate, Oct. 27-31.

Make sure to check back for updates of the week, as The Feather will be offering a live feed display of #FCgoesHollywood.

With the start of the 30th annual homecoming week, FC is set to host an event each day that all students can participate, Oct. 27-31. Homecoming photos from the week tagged #FCgoesHollywood via Instagram and Twitter will be updated throughout the day.

From ‘Merica Monday, students will dress up in all of their patriotic garb to Think alike Thursday where students will dress up as twins or triplets. The week will end with the homecoming game which starts at 7 p.m., Oct. 31.

Activities from the Monday’s Blood Drive to Thursday’s King Dance will be scheduled throughout the week for students participate in for homecoming class points. The homecoming court will be announced at half time during the game as well.

Students are encouraged to tag their Instagram and Twitter posts and hashtag them #FCgoesHollywood to be included; the installment will collaborate with staffers and students alike.

As students participate in dress-up days, pageants and dances, tagging photos to the official hashtag will be collected through this installment in Storify.

For more on homecoming, read the Oct. 24 article, #FCgoesHollywood: Eagles strut their stuff (VIDEO).

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline.

For more news, read the Oct. 27 article, Student Leadership: Homecoming is upon us.

By |2014-10-31T00:00:00-07:00October 31st, 2014|News, The Feather, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Get to know: The Queen Pageant of 2014 (VIDEO)

With homecoming only one more day away, students celebrated the annual Queen Pageant, Oct. 29, to get to know the homecoming court queen nominees. The event featured a unique fashion show, a video all about the queen nominees and lip sync concert.

Afterward, a video featuring the queens began, each queen explaining why they thought students should vote for them. The video also had the nominees share what the best attribute about the others was as well as answering questions such as who would make the best date chaperone or survive in a horror movie.

Some students, like Kathryn Blankenship, ’17, enjoyed the video more than the pageant itself this year.

“I really liked the video. I thought it was funny and it was cool how they acted out their stories and stuff,” Blankenship said. I didn’t really like the actual pageant itself. It was funny when they started lip syncing but it got kinda boring. I miss last years pageant with all the challenges and food.”

The 30th annual homecoming will be on the north field at 7 p.m., Oct. 31. Homecoming candidates will be introduced during the pre-game at 6:30, and the homecoming court announced during half-time.

Follow The Feather via Twitter and Instagram: @thefeather and @thefeatheronlilne.This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_rynnking.

For more videos, watch the Oct. 28 clip, FC Underground 2014-15, No. 13 (VIDEO). For more videos, check out Queens got talent, sashay down the runway (VIDEO) and visit the

By |2014-10-29T00:00:00-07:00October 29th, 2014|Uncategorized, Videos|0 Comments

Campus halls star Hollywood dress up days: Tacky Tourist Tuesday (VIDEO)

Following ‘Merica Monday, today’s event was Tacky Tourist Tuesday. Students came out with fanny packs, sunscreen, Hawaiian shirts, sunglasses, and sandals with socks. All of this to show school spirit and earn points for the homecoming competition.

Kathryn Damschen, ’15 wasn’t going to miss this week and neglect the chance to have fun and be goofy with friends.

IMG_6772Jeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

“I just wanted to make the most out of my last year here at FC,” Damschen said. “It was exciting to see everyone dressed up in their attire and be goofy. I got my shirt from my dads closet and my fanny pack is from the 70’s and I’m wearing socks with sandals, today is an awesome day. I don’t want to look back and think I was one of those people who didn’t dress up and miss out on my high school years.”

Newly attending Sophomore Josh Olsen remained one of the few to not dress up but still tried his best to participate in today’s event.

“I didn’t have any tacky tourist clothes,” Olsen said. “Yet I improvised and tucked my pants into my socks hoping to earn points for my class. While I didn’t dress up today, their is no way i’m missing wake up Wednesday and I will probably participate in spirit Friday. Even though I am new here, it is still a good idea to show support for your school and become involved in most of the events here at FC.”

Freshmen Celeste Counts was excited for dress up day and the opportunity to portray her personality for all to see.

“It was nice to be able to portray my personality through this event,” Counts said. “I found a shirt from Indonesia in my closet, and just searched throughout my house to find he rest of my accessories. Its fun seeing everyone dress up and show parts of their personality, whether it is the shy tourist or extrovert tourist, all these forms bring us as a class and school together. While today was a blast, twin day will be outstanding, my best friend and I will be dressing up alike, this will definitely be a day which I will remember in the years of high school to come.”

Tyler Breedlove, ’16, was excited for this week and the moments in which the whole school got involved with the activities provided by Leadership.

“Homecoming week is probably my favorite week,” Breedlove said. “Its the one week where everyone has spirit for their school and shows it off with enthusiasm. I decided to rock a Hawaiian button up and some Bahama shorts. While today was fun, I am especially looking forward to wake up Wednesday, probably along with everyone else the comfortable school day will make tomorrow a day to keep me rested.”

This day’s event ended with the Juniors dressing out more than the rest of the classes. Despite the win, the Juniors are currently tied with the Seniors while the Sophomores are in third and the Freshmen are relaxing in last pace.

Tomorrow is ‘Waking up Wednesday’, which is predicted to have a large turnout. Make sure to wear comfortable pajama’s in support of FC homecoming. Also, bring your school spirit for the Queen Pageant.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @J0sh_Carter.

By |2014-10-28T00:00:00-07:00October 28th, 2014|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Campus halls star Hollywood dress up days: 'Merica Monday (VIDEO)

Homecoming week is finally here so let the dress up days begin! The festivities begin with ‘Merica Monday, anything red, white or blue will do!

Cole Nale, ’15, was particularly excited for today’s theme and knew exactly what to wear.

DressUpDay1Jennifer Smith | The Feather Online Archive

“I didn’t want to be average and wear just red, white and blue,” Nale said. “I dressed up with an American flag sweater, which is pretty awesome. I also have red jeans and underwear with stars on them, but you can’t exactly see those. Also, I have patriotic socks that look super cool.”

Dillon Owens, ’15, saw ‘Merica Monday more than just a dress up day. He saw it as an opportunity to show his appreciation for the military.

“Today, instead of dressing up in the typical colors, I decided to dress up in my Airman Battle Uniform {ABU},” Owens said. “I wanted to show my gratitude for the army; they fight for our country and risk their lives for our freedom. Most of my family, such as my uncles, was in the Air Force. I have a deep respect for what they do and I plan on enlisting in the Air Force once I graduate high school.”

Kathryn Blankenship, ’17, participated in the festivities, but did not decide to go ‘all out.'”

“I decided to wear something a little more casual and not so crazy,” Blankenship said. “I have a red Stanford sweater with some blue shoes and blue jeans. I like to be comfortable while still participating.”

Brooklyn Barth, ’16, feels it is important to participate in school activities, especially during homecoming week.

“I think participation is really important during homecoming week whether it’s the dress up days, the pageants, or the rally on Friday,” Barth said. “It shows school spirit and the unity of each class.”

All the classes had a pretty good turnout with half or more of the students participating.

Tomorrow’s dress up theme is Tacky Tourist Tuesday. Also, come out and support your homecoming princesses in the Princess Pageant.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_olivialoren_.

Follow The Feather via Twitter: @thefeather.

By |2014-10-27T00:00:00-07:00October 27th, 2014|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

EDITORIAL: Overcoming everyday excuses

As the first quarter of the school year wraps up, campus students begin to stress and doubt about the various responsibilities each individual has stacked up. A major part of student life turns into wondering if there is enough time in the day to finish their pile of tasks.

With scares such as Ebola and the never ending drought taking over the news, things may seem quite depressing in the world. Some students have grown apathetic towards these news events, but the problem is that apathy seeps into other parts of their lives. Namely, procrastination.

Procrastination is a common theme laced into the lives of students, and just about everyone else in the world. This excuse is founded in fear: fear that we are not good enough and fear of failure. However, this is not the answer to our problems.

Cutting out procrastination is easier said than done. For many, It is difficult to face these responsibilities head on and to take leadership.

Embarrassment is a common factor for all teens. Our image is everything and failure is not an option. This ever-revolving cycle is an unhealthy reflection of our shaky self-esteem.

If students are unwilling to make sacrifices for their campus and the lives of others, it does not simply affect them, but will later turn to negatively affect everyone.

Sometimes it is hard to admit that we cannot do everything on our own. That does not mean that we should give up on everything. It can be hard to practice tough love on ourselves, but in some situations it is necessary.

The first step to making positive changes is letting go of our apathy. People all around are monitoring and figuring out how you act and what role you play on your campus. If all we do is complain each and every day, nothing will ever get done.

It is time to go, to help out. If you want to receive, then you must give. You cannot expect something that you do not give in return.

It works like this: If you do not give enthusiasm, then you do not get enthusiasm. We are capable, but we often times let ourselves be defined by our excuses. If no credit is given, then it is as if no work was made.

Homecoming is coming up and many students are less than likely to help with activities. Our percentages of students involved in Homecoming may be higher than nearby schools due to our small population, but that means that individuals are so much more valuable to campus culture.

Instead of hearing people complaining about our school, make a difference so that others won’t. Don’t allow other depressing themes get in the way we view our lives. If they make an impact on you, allow it to be a positive one.

Follow The Feather via Twitter: @thefeather.

For more opinions, read the Oct. 14 column, COLUMN: Ebola virus continues to infect.

By |2014-10-15T00:00:00-07:00October 15th, 2014|Opinions, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Annual event provides grandparents with campus experience

GDay2FCS file photo

High school and junior high grandparents were able to attend second and half of third period before heading off to lunch. Each year the grandparents and students are treated to a lasagna lunch provided by Student Leadership.

The young and old alike gathered together in the cramped halls of FC during the morning hours of last Friday. The 23rd annual Grandparents Day was in full swing, as students brought their grandparents around the campus, Oct. 3.

Wheelchairs and canes set foot in Building 5 and 6 around 9:30 a.m., while the faculty handed out student schedules. Grandparents where ushered into their grandchildren’s classes as Student Leadership also provided assistance with the elevators, room locations and extra chairs needed during the day.

Student Leadership member Tim Nyberg, ’16, assisted many of grandparents during the day. He enjoyed the fact that just giving your time was appreciated by many of the grandparents.

“My grandparents weren’t able to come, so must of the time I was helping out the grandparents, with Student Leadership, that needed anything during the day,” Nyberg said. “It’s fun to help the elderly because they are so grateful whenever you give your time, even if it’s something like grabbing an extra chair for them.”

High school and junior high grandparents were able to attend second and half of third period before heading off to lunch. Each year the grandparents and students are treated to a lasagna lunch provided by Student Leadership. Dessert is provided by teacher Sharon Scharf and her home economics classes.

Home Economics student Claire Kollenkark, ’16, helped bake the various cookies served at lunch in the FC Gym, along side the lasagna. Kollenkark is also apart of Student Leadership as wel, which allowed her to see all the aspects in setting up an event like this one.

“Being able to be apart of all the many parts that go into the day was exciting,” Kollenkark said. “I think serving cookies alongside the meal or just small things like a coffee and juice table set up for grandparents in the hall made the day special for them.”

Jerry Peterson, grandfather of Sara Peterson, ’15, has attended Grandparents Day for 6 years. This is Sara’s last year at FC, which was bittersweet for Jerry.

“This is my 6th year at Grandparents Day and it is also my granddaughters last year at FC,” Jerry said. “It was bittersweet for me to see that this will be my last Grandparents Day spent with her, but it was great to see her mature over the years she has been here.”

Junior Emmaline Krohn was also disappointed that her grandparents were unable to come, but enjoyed getting to see the rest of the other grandparents. In some of Krohn’s classes, the grandparents provided a sense of amusement with unique personalities and age differences.

“My grandparents were unable to come today, but it was fun to see all the grandparents walking around in the halls,” Krohn said. “In Spanish, it was really cute seeing all the grandparents trying to say the Spanish words with our class”

Jarrod Markarian was able to enjoy the day with his grandparents. Even though grandparents just visited two periods, the majority of the day was less hectic than usual.

“Spending the day with my grandparents was really fun,” Markarian said. “I found the classes to be a lot more enjoyable with family. The day was light hearted, but even the grandparents got to learn some things during class.”

Katherine Belmont, grandma of Sydney Belmont, ’17, enjoys the fact that she can see what her grandchild does during school. Not just going through her classes, but seeing her personality and decisions shes makes during the day.

“I love to see where Sydney is every day, what she’s doing in school and seeing her teachers, as well as how she interacts with her friends,” Katherine said. “All these are really exciting to see during the day. I am really happy to be here.”


After half of third period was over, the campus congregated around the FC Gym, where lunch was available to students and grandparents. Student Leadership member Chloe Mueller, ’16, helped serve lasagna during lunch, but also brought her own grandparents as well.

“I didn’t have much time to visit with my grandparents during the day, so they mostly just accompanied my cousin to the different {Jayden Ventura} classes,” Mueller said. “Besides that, I still had a lot of fun serving the grandparents food. It was nice to see everyone having a good time bonding and hanging out during the day with family and friends.”

Sandra Surolie, grandparent of Jordan Castro, ’15, and Julian Castro, ’17, has been attending Grandparents Day for three years. Not only being able to see what her grand kids are doing in school, but getting involved with the classes themselves as well was unique to Surolie’s experience on campus.

“I love being with my grandson anytime, but his {Julian} history class was very interesting,” Surolie said. We all got involved. This is probably one of the most grandparent involved classes that I have been too, since I have only been to two {Grandparents Day} other than today. It was defiantly my favorite one so far.

This author can be reached via Twitter: @rynnking_.

For more features, read the Oct. 6 article, Artist shares the gospel through paint, martial arts.

By |2014-10-06T00:00:00-07:00October 6th, 2014|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Grandparents Day 2014 (VIDEO)

The young and old alike gathered together in the cramped halls of FC during the morning hours of last Friday. The 23rd annual Grandparents Day was in full swing, as students brought their grandparents around the campus, Oct. 3.

Wheelchairs and canes set foot in Building 5 and 6 around 9:30 a.m., while the faculty handed out student schedules. Grandparents where ushered into their grandchildren’s classes as Student Leadership also provided assistance with the elevators, room locations and extra chairs needed during the day.

Student Leadership member Tim Nyberg, ’16, assisted many of grandparents during the day. He enjoyed the fact that just giving your time was appreciated by many of the grandparents.

“My grandparents weren’t able to come, so must of the time I was helping out the grandparents, with Student Leadership, that needed anything during the day,” Nyberg said. “It’s fun to help the elderly because they are so grateful whenever you give your time, even if it’s something like grabbing an extra chair for them.”

High school and junior high grandparents were able to attend second and half of third period before heading off to lunch. Each year the grandparents and students are treated to a lasagna lunch provided by Student Leadership. Dessert is provided by teacher Sharon Scharf and her home economics classes.

Sandra Surolie, grandparent of Jordan Castro, ’15, and Julian Castro, ’17, has been attending Grandparents Day for three years. Not only being able to see what her grand kids are doing in school, but getting involved with the classes themselves as well was unique to Surolie’s experience on campus.

“I love being with my grandson anytime, but his {Julian} history class was very interesting,” Surolie said. We all got involved. This is probably one of the most grandparent involved classes that I have been too, since I have only been to two {Grandparents Day} other than today. It was defiantly my favorite one so far.

For more videos, please check out the last creations in the

By |2014-10-03T00:00:00-07:00October 3rd, 2014|Uncategorized, Videos|1 Comment

5 seconds of Dooman (VIDEO)

In an effort to celebrate video goofiness, The Feather video staff has decided to return to a 2012 favorite video series. While the senior duo of Aaron DeWolf and Christopher Grossman do not currently create videos, a team has decided to resurrect a short segment those to did as freshmen: 5 seconds with Dooman.

For those viewers who missed the series, they might check out the advanced search button at the top of the menu bar and search for John Dooman. However, another way to check out DeWolf and Grossman as freshmen and their novice ways, please look for The Show (2012-13) with Grossman and DeWolf. A reasonable place to begin might be with Episode 1 in August 2012. .

At the end of each episode, the next video is promoted. Viewers may wish to comment on the youthful look of the two guest hosts but a not so different look of Dooman.

Jason Swain, ’15 and John Dooman, ’15, recall their sophomore year and remake the short series of 5 seconds of Dooman. The video contains segments from the original 5 seconds of Dooman as well as current clips of Dooman happenings.

Follow The Feather via Twitter: @thefeather. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @_sarapeterson.

By |2014-09-26T00:00:00-07:00September 26th, 2014|Uncategorized, Videos|0 Comments

Fashion Show 2014 (VIDEO)

Screen Shot 2014-10-15 at 9.40.25 AMJeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

During the chapel girls learned more about what NOT to wear and other stylish tips and wore clothes from the local Buckle store.

During a Thursday gender chapel, the female students on campus were treated to a talk on dress code that was a little unorthodox compared to previous talks given. Instead of teachers reviewing the dress code with the girls, they reviewed the rules through a video and fashion show, Sept. 25.

The video detailed several tricks students sometimes use to try and cheat dress code and how they sometimes ignore it all together. It featured a uniformed “Enforcer”, a familiar face dressed in a police uniform and aviators, ready to take away any dress code offenders.

During the chapel girls learned more about what NOT to wear and other stylish tips and wore clothes from the local Buckle store. Six high school girls were chosen and styled for the big event by high school teacher, Kori Friesen, who masterminded this chapel idea over the summer. Dean of Students, Amy Deffenbacher discussed dress code values. This chapel is sure to be a favorite.

Participants (Left to right) Elise Winegarden, ’15, Claire Kollenkark, ’16, Jenny King, ’17, Sally Rudolfs , ’18, Jenna Bynum, ’18, Morgan Koop, ’16, each paraded down a runway much to the delight of the girls in attendance.

Bes sure to read about the event in the Sept. 26, article, Chapel features modest fashion show, dress code.

For more on the Fashion Show, check out Chapel fashion show and Buckle website.

By |2014-09-26T00:00:00-07:00September 26th, 2014|Fashion, FC Events, Uncategorized, Videos, Videos 2014-15|1 Comment

College fair informs, excites student body (VIDEO)

CollegeFairs1Ryan King

Over 30 different colleges set up their booths in the Ground Zero quad during lunch, Sept. 23. Each schools advertises the special programs and majors they offer.

With the future years running through the minds of many upperclassmen, FC hosted their annual Fresno Christian College Fair in order to inform the student body, Sept. 23.

Over 30 different colleges set up their booths in the Ground Zero area during lunch. Each advertising the special programs and majors they offer, to get the attention of campus students.

Several Christian schools, as well as local colleges and universities, presented information to students about applying and events, such as school tours and class sit-ins.

Grand Canyon University (GCU) representative Nick Chandler had the opportunity to speak individually with each class before lunch during advisory period. Chandler found that students were more inclined to learn about GCU during the college fair after he spoke to each class.

“I think the hardest thing for colleges in general is if you haven’t heard of us, you won’t be as inclined to talk to us,” Chandler said. “Getting a chance to talk to everyone exposes people that normally wouldn’t have known about GCU to the opportunities we have, and to see if it might be a good fit.”

With college coming up soon for many seniors, as well as juniors, they are more apt to ask questions during the event. Freshman and sophomores were also invited to the fair, to get a better grasp on college. To set the atmosphere, a raffle drawing was available for students to win prizes. Students were able to obtain a ticket if they visited at least three booths, which would then be entered into the drawing.

Academic Adviser Michelle Warkentin hosted the campus to several more colleges than in previous years. She was excited to see the turnout of campus students and college representatives alike.

“I feel like the college fair went very well. We had a great turnout and it seemed to be a fun event for both students and college representatives,” Warkentin said. “The event ran smoothly and the raffle drawing was a huge hit! Each year we have been able to bring more colleges on our campus which is always an exciting thing.”

Even though the fair was set up to inform upperclassmen on a variety of colleges before applying, lowerclassmen were still able to get information to help ready them for the years ahead. Sophomore Timothy Melendez enjoyed getting to see the Christian colleges at the fair, as well as the various programs available.

“I think I have a better understanding of colleges after seeing some of the options at the fair today,” Melendez said. “I liked that there were a lot of Christian colleges and a wide variety of things to get involved with.”

After attending the campus fair, students were also able to attend the Buchanan National Christian College Fair which started in the evening from 6-8 p.m.. Even though both fairs featured Christian colleges, there were a select few schools only featured at Buchanan, and vice versa.

Alumna Emily Shakeshaft represented Paul Mitchell School to advertise to former school mates on the various programs available. Shakeshaft encourages students to look into applying Paul Mitchell School because of it’s stability within the beauty professions.

“Paul Mitchell is very different from many of the schools here today, being that it is a just a trade school,” Shakeshaft said. “If you get involved here [/fusion_builder_column]

[Paul Mitchell School] you will always have a job, because no matter how bad the economy is, women don’t stop getting their done and men don’t stop getting their hair cut.”

Senior Ivette Ibarra was able to get a sense of what college she wanted to apply to after attending the event. With college just around the corner, she felt that the fair was a lot more relatable compared to in years before.

“I had a broad idea of what colleges I wanted to attend, but now I have kind of narrowed down my options,” Ibarra said. “This year it was more real to me. This is what I have to think about since it’s my last year in high school, so I found it [college fair] a lot more relatable.”

Gabriela Siqueiros, Features Editor, and Sara Peterson, Editor-in-chief, also contributed to this article.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @rynnking_

For more features, read the Sept. 24 article, Eldery Fresno resident uses talents to benefit community.

By |2014-09-25T00:00:00-07:00September 25th, 2014|Features, Photos 2014-15, Uncategorized, Videos 2014-15|5 Comments

Apple announces new products: Join the discussion (VIDEO)

Apple1Jeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

Students give their opinions on new Apple products, to be released Sept. 19.

With the new Apple announcement, students all around campus were talking about the new iPhone 6 and other products soon to be released, Sept. 9.

The iPhone 6, as well as the iPhone 6 Plus, feature “bigger than bigger” screens than the iPhone 5s and a total of 50 hours of audio playback and 11 hours of video watching worth in battery life. Both phones are to be officially released, Sept. 19.

Not only did Apple introduce the newest phones of the season, but also their newest wearable device, the Apple Watch. Two other versions of the original Apple Watch have also been introduced to the public, the Apple Watch Sport and the Apple Watch Edition.

Some students express their excitement with the new devices, but others might not be used to the specs and features Apple offers.

The Feather wants to encourage students to submit their opinions in the comment section on how the iPhone 6 and Apple Watch will meet their standards and expectations.

I’m indifferent
Katy Blakenship, ’17
Sept. 11, 2014

?I think nothing about this, honestly. This affects my life in no way, and I could not care less. I?m not going to get a new phone for about five years anyway, so it makes no difference to me.”

High definition
Collin Winegarden, ’15
Sept. 11, 2014

“I think it’s editing and camera are cool to have, the iPhone 6 plus is too big. It seems like it would be really bulky to hold. With the new camera and the high definition screen it’s going to have really good quality. I would prefer the iPhone 6 from the iPhone 5s because it’s faster and new.”

The perfect fit
Morgan Miller, ’16
Sept. 10, 2014

“The iPhone 6 Plus is just too big for me. I have an iPhone 5s right now and I am really interested in getting the iPhone 6 because it can fit in everything I want in a device, it’s perfect for me.”

Watch out for the watch
Marissa Jonigan, ’16
Sept. 10, 2014

“I am looking forward for the {Apple} Watch to come out. It seems like a really good idea and I love the sleek look.”

Thinner than thin
Chris Kollenkark, ’16
Sept. 10, 2014

“I have an old LG Samsung right now, but I would probably get just the plain iPhone 6. It sounds interesting because I heard it’s going to be one of the thinnest phones ever created. I’m excited to see how it turns out.”

Features not worth the buy
Stephen Walters, ’18
Sept. 10, 2014

“They are adding something about tracking your health and fitness progress,” Walters said. “Besides that they only really added aesthetics. This makes it not really worth buying.”

Impressed by sapphire glass
Tyler Villines, ’18
Sept. 10, 2014

“I like how they made the sapphire glass because I?m accident prone when it comes to devices and with this glass it makes me feel secure about dropping my phone. I wasn’t too sure about the bigger screen, but I grew to like it because it’s not thicker, it’s just larger.”

Everyone wants the new thing
Claire Kollenkark, ’16
Sept. 10, 2014

“I think the size is good and it doesn’t scratch so that?s a plus and it’s the new thing and everyone wants new things. The iPhone 6 Plus is way too big for me because I put my phone in my pocket and that would not fit.”

Durability or size
Lauryn Tucker, ’18
Sept. 10, 2014

“I don?t know if I really like it because it’s way too big and I can?t fit it into my pocket. I like the glass because it’s more durable and it doesn’t scratch. I have the iPhone 5s and I prefer the one I have. The only reason I would switch is because of the durability.”

Old fashion
Andrea Donaghe, English teacher
Sept. 10, 2014

“The larger size is way too big for me the perfect size for me is the iPhone 4. I want it to be able to fit in a pocket, that’s what it all comes down to for me. I?m super careful with my things so the sapphire screen wouldn’t really benefit me, but I think it’s a very smart feature for other users. I only really use my phone for text and calls. I can just borrow my husband’s phone when I want to check out the new features.”

Sydney Belmont, Writer also contributed to this article.

For more features, read the Sept. 10 article International students assimilate to campus life .

By |2014-09-10T00:00:00-07:00September 10th, 2014|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments