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Fresno State hosts Armenian Centennial Concert

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Dance Medley of Armenian Dances began with male dancers with Armenian cultural clothing and later introduced the female dancers onto the stage.

Evening of dance, music in memory of Armenian genocide

As 2015 marks the 100th year of the Armenian Genocide, various of events are planned to commemorate this tragedy. One of which is the Armenian Genocide Centennial Concert on March 8 at Fresno State.

This unique event gather the dancing groups Hamazkayin Niari Dance Ensemble, The Chookasian Armenian Concert Ensemble along with hundreds of descendants of survivors from the Armenian Genocide. The commemoration was separated to several parts which included two speeches celebrating the survival from the hand of the Ottoman Empire.

The Armenian Centennial Concert included ensemble and dancing groups as they performed several different songs represent various parts of the Armenian history. From the male dances to impress females to the wedding dance, from the escape of the Turkish to the desperation of the existence of God, and the age-old song written by Harutyun Syatian in 18th centuries to a brand new song written in 21st centuries encouraging the young generation, the concert has shown numerous cultures of the Armenian.

Founders of the Chookasian Armenian Concert Ensemble, John and Barbara Chookasian started the program in 1994. With the goal to perform traditional yet rarely heard music, John and Barbara along with six other multi-award artists performed over 15 songs in the concert. Many of the performances were folkloric which were played in several different timeline.

Few of the performances stood out the most were “Khossek Hayastani Lerner”–Speak of the Armenian mountains, “Garno Sharjoum”–The Call (to arms) has sounded, and the “Armenian Folk Song Medley”.

Khosseck Hayastani Lerner, song sang by Barbara, is a blue folkloric described the separation of the young, the family and the mother who was forced to leave her child and home. Part of the lyrics describes an Armenian mother desperately wanting to know the news of her homeland and the miserable sadness of her losing her son. Throughout the song, words “Ararat” was mention multiple times, which is the name of the mountain where the song was written. Armenian had been living on the mountain for generation, but during the genocide, Turkish took over the mountain along with many others.

The Armenian Centennial Concert is a great success. Although myself do not relate to any Armenian, I could definintely feel the struggles and all the desperation of the Armenian. As a person who enjoy art and music, I can not express the emotion on many of the elders faces when the first song was sang. It was so emotional and so comforting at the same time. It seems like after hundred of years of suppressing anger and lost of family is now first being relief. –Junior Feather staffer Michael Fu

Garno Sharjoum is a nationalistic song of the historic uprising in Province of Erzrum during the Armenian Genocide. Even though facing with great treats and risking their own lives fought against Turkish, many of the Armenian got united and stood against the rival power. This song provided a powerful message uplift the hearts of many Armenian people and given them strength to endure through the Genocide.

One of the notable song performed by Hayka Nalbandyan with saz, a traditional Armenian double-bodied lute. Played like a guitar, lute is also called bazouk. The instrument can cover large range of area. The song was origin from the folk dance. This medley is quick yet simple allowed many quickly immerse into the music.

Beside performing music and singing, the concert also invited dance group from L.A., Hamazkayin Valley Chapter Niari Dance Group was found in 2000 with 27 dancers, it now has over hundred of dancers. From aged of 5 to 28 years old, over 30 dancers participate in the centennial concert here at Fresno State.

Dance Medley of Armenian Dances performed by many of the dancers was a joyful performance. Four male dancers started the dance with Armenian cultural clothing and later introduced the female dancers onto the stage. With quick beat and colorful costumes, they quickly bring the audience to a joyful world.

Oor Aeyir Asdvadz traslate to “Where Were You O’ God?” is also performed by the Hamazkayin dance group. Song wrote by Mesdjian. This is a song of Armenian crying to God asking of where is He. The performance was slow and probably the most broken-hearted to both audiences and all survivors. Wearing purple dresses, a powerful message has sent to many of the outsider. Several eyes were fill with tears.

The concert is a great success. Although myself does not relate to any Armenian, I could definitely feel the struggles and all the desperation of the Armenian. As a person who enjoy art and music, I can not express the emotion on many of the elders faces when the first song was sang. It was so emotional and so comforting at the same time. It seems like after hundred of years of suppressing anger and lost of family is now first being relief.

Outside of the CSUF Satellite Student Union, a genocide monument is currently building right now and will be complete on April 24. Students and families are all welcome to the ceremony.

For more information about Armenian Genocide article and picture check out Armenian Centennial Genocide article in photo section.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @fmichael_0501.

By |2015-03-27T00:00:00+00:00March 27th, 2015|Community Events, Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Featured app: GameChanger

https://gc.com

The GameChanger app helps baseball fans, students, and family members to track the baseball game in real time. It is designed to help coaches and players to track their stats result digitally and allow fans who are not able to be at the game to see the game in process.

The GameChanger app helps baseball fans, students, and family members to track the baseball game at real time. It is designed to help coaches and players to track their stats result digitally and allow fans who are not able to be at the game to see the game in process.

The app puts a focus on a more efficient way to collect data and better way to connect fans, players and coaches. GameChanger is now available for baseball, softball and basketball. Currently only working on iOS system and on the internet, GameChanger allows members to track the schedule, roster, season stats, and so much more.

Searching for better way to record the game datas, I discovered the app on Apple Store that creates much efficient way to record the game.

While a new user first downloads the app, simply search the team that you want to follow and request to become a fan. If the user already has an account, go through the log in process, and wait for the admin to confirm the request. For new users, the sign up page will show up and allows user to create their account.

After becoming a fan, users can view the game schedule as well as the information of the rosters. Since the GameChanger is in sync with Maxpreps, the game result will automatically upload to Maxpreps website. Once the game begin, users on the iOS devices can watch the game in process.

The best features given to premium users is the ability to watch the game in process as well as view the statistics for full pitch counts and be able to replay the game on personal devices even after the game is over. –Junior Michael Fu

Coaches can also create their own team, view the whole team stats and send announcements via e-mail. While the game is in process, admins can record the result on the scoring mood and do all the lineups as well as see the scorebook automatically create by the app.

The best features given to premium users is the ability to watch the game in process as well as view the statistics for full pitch counts and be able to replay the game on personal devices even after the game is over.
After the game is finished, GameChanger created a digital scorebook along with highlights, box score, away stats, home stats, plays, as well as a short recap story. However, only the admins have the full access to all of the data.

For the fans, players, family members, the access is limited and they can not see all of the details unless they become premium fan. This feature prevents other teams from seeing their opponents data.

The best features given to premium users is the ability to watch the game in process as well as view the statistics for full pitch counts and be able to replay the game on personal devices even after the game is over.

Other features of GameChanger include the ability to connect through Twitter and Facebook, send out alerts when the game starts and the result after the game is over. For coaches who prefer a paper version, the website also helps users create PDF files. The developer even created code for schools to put on their websites, to allow students to see the live scoreboard.

Click here to view your Fresno Christian account on GameChanger.

The writer can be reached via Twitter: @fmiachel_0501.

For more articles, read the Feb 27 article, Sophomore discovers musical talent, excels.

By |2015-03-10T00:00:00+00:00March 10th, 2015|Technology, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Baseball sport shorts: Laton

unnamedMichael Fu

After defeating Laton, 21-3, on March 3, the Eagles host Stone Ridge Christian, March 7.

Boys Baseball Sport Shorts, 2015

For a preview to the Eagles baseball season and look at their scores so far, check out the score on Maxpreps, 2014-2015, for dates, times, and other winter sports.

Also check out the schedule for this year baseball season on Fresno Christian athletic website. The overall result fo the FC is currently 3-1. The first league game will be play on April 7.

The Eagles defeat Laton, 21-3

Winning two games in a row, the FC baseball team traveled to their first away game in Laton, March 3. Focusing on training new pitchers freshman Roman Endicott, finished the game with his first appearance on the mound.

Multi-schooler Jorge Castro took the mound in the first and all the way through the third inning. Giving out two strike outs in the first and second inning, Castro allowed Laton to gain no points but only two runners on the base. In the bottom of the third inning, FC lost a point due to a wild pitch. Castro quickly came back after walk and left the hill with three strike outs against Laton.

Scoring first for the Eagles is also Castro, with a strong hit to the centerfield, Castro was on second base and later sent home by senior Dillion Owens. Owens later stole home and gained the second point for the team.

The player receiving the most RBIs belongs to starting catcher Tyler Sellers, ’16. Although starting late in his batting, Sellers racked up four RBIs with one double and two triples between the fourth and fifth innings.

In the bottom of the fifth inning, Roman Endicott started out on the mound for the first time. Though having trouble getting the ball to the strike zone, Endicott gave out two walks before he struck out the third batter. Followed by the strike out, Endicott got a ground ball to second base and multi-schooler Sam Janzen, took got the second out on first base.

Laton scored two points on a double, Endicott finished the next batter throwing only strikes and struck out the batter. Later the coach of Laton agreed to end the game in the top of the sixth inning.

The Eagles will play their next game against Stone Ridge High School, March 7 on the north field at FC at 10 a.m.

For more information check out GameChanger recorded the game stats of the game against Laton.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @fmichael_0501.

For more sports, read the March 2 article, Baseball sport shorts: Avenal.

By |2015-03-09T00:00:00+00:00March 9th, 2015|Announcements, Spring, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Student reaches chart-topping rank in worldwide game

screen568x568Jeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

Designed by Lukas Korba, Octagon is a quick reflect game made for iOS, android, windows and Mac OS game.

Designed by Lukas Korba, Octagon is a quick reflect game made for iOS, android, windows and Mac OS game. Players can not only play with their touch screen, but also has variety of choices to play the game include game controller and keyboard.

The easy control of the game and the colorful graphic design quickly allowed Octagon to become one of the popular games on smartphones and other devices. Octagon is now the 15th most popular game on the Mac app store since it was uploaded into the market on Oct. 30, 2013.

There are two modes of playing Octagon: classic mode, in which the goal is to avoid all the blocks, gaps and safely arrive at the destination. The other mode is endless mode, just like Temple Run there is no end for the game. The randomly generated patterns allow players to challenge themselves and keep themselves in focus and alive as long as possible.

Min Lee ’16 has become one of the top Octagon players in the world. On top of the 206,806 players Lee is competing with, she currently holds the 40th place worldwide with game level 2264.

“I saw Caitlin [/fusion_builder_column]

[Gaines] playing Octagon and she helped me download it,” Lee said. “Since then, I have constantly been playing Octagon.”

Despite the fact that Lee joined the game almost a year after it was published, she has achieved a great status in just a short amount of time.

“I only played Octagon for two months,” Lee said. “And somehow I reached level 2000. I guess I just have a knack for it. Just keep playing and you will realize that this game is actually really easy.”

Such success in a short period of time makes others wonder whether there is a tactic or special strategy to complete each level faster.

Although Lee has reached an unbreakable record for the FCS, she recommends others do not get too devoted to this game.

“I want to be in top 20, but I am not proud of myself,” Lee said. “Because addiction to any game is never a good thing.”

For more information of the Octagon, check out Featured app: Octagon.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @fmichael_0501.

For more features, read the Jan. 8 article, Local PBS showcases exclusive Downton Abbey preview.

By |2015-01-20T00:00:00+00:00January 20th, 2015|Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Student travels to Taiwan over the holidays

P1080848_FotorRyan King | The Feather Online Archive

People come all the way from Japan and stopped by Jiquing Village to enjoy the lights and Christmas spirit.

Despite this being my fourth year of study in United States, each year during Christmas, I have never spent my holidays here in the States. Although people in Taiwan know about this holiday, people rarely pay attention to this holiday.

This year I left early for Christmas break to be reunited with my family. During the time I spent with my family, we decided to explore this island that we have lived on for decades and in search of different cultures in Taiwan to help others who have never visited the place I called home.

Regardless, the plane landed at the Taoyuan International Airport, and my journey began. The first stop I arrived at was the Taiwan High Speed Railroad Station in Taoyuan, and the price of the ticket at only three dollars. I arrived in the heart of the country, Taipei. Although Taipei city might seem small on the map, this city contain one-tenth the population of Taiwan.

After arriving home from the, Taipei Metro, I set down my luggage and begun my trip. One of the first buildings we visited was Taipei Arena. Opened in 2005, this large multi-function gym provides more than 15,000 seats and allows different varieties of sports to play indoor without the disruption of the weather. This arena also has the ability to freeze the floor for ice skating.

When people asked me what the most special part of Taiwan is, I have to say the food. Shillin Night Market, one of the many places people have to visit, has held the title of representing the food of Taiwan for many years. Famous for many different foods, I could not even named all of them. Some as simple as fried chicken, shillin sausage, oyster omelette, cold noodles and even stinky tofu could be the most delicious dishes one could ever have.

On Nov. 29, my dad and I traveled to Pingxi and visited another popular tourist hub in Taiwan. Well known other than food, Pingxi is the only place the government allows people to release sky lanterns. Because I did not want to miss this unique chance to truly become involved with the Taiwanese culture, we bought a lantern and released it into the sky with wishes written on the lantern.
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The first day of the December, I traveled to Tamsui, a harbor that used to be the biggest port in Taiwan and also had the name of Eastern Venice. One thing that stood out in Tansui is the street artists who gathered there from all over the place. Singers, artists, buskers and people who make molds of your hands. Beside all of these special characters of Tansui, my favorite part was the sunset. Sitting beside the ocean with the breeze coming from the sea, I spent the most delightful time watching sunset with Tansui special gigantic ice cream that is over 20 inches tall.

On Christmas Eve, I found the place with the most Christmas spirit was next to our village. In Jiquing Village, a tradition of decorating houses with Christmas lights has once again drawn tourists from many places to feel the holiday spirit. People came all the way from Japan and stopped by this romantic place under the lights and Christmas spirit to enjoy the special day of the year.

Soon after Christmas, my family and I took the THSR to Kaohsiung where my dad originally came from and visited his two uncles since this is most likely the last time I can travel freely back and forth between United States and Taiwan. The next day I visited my mother’s family and then we head on to the airport and back to the United States.

Although it is hard to feel the spirit of this huge holiday, this visit to Taiwan has become the most valuable memory for me. Even though I have lived with this culture over decades, it is now that I realize the opportunity to go back has now become harder and harder. But with the new friends here at FC, I believe there are many more beautiful memories waiting for us to create together.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @fmichael_0501.

For another opinions article read, the Dec. 15 article, College Corner: Financial Aid

By |2015-01-06T00:00:00+00:00January 6th, 2015|Destinations, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Cross Country sport shorts: CIF Central Section Valley Championship

glen-cross-country-photoRyan King | The Feather Online Archive

The FC cross country team traveled to Woodward Park to participate in the CIF Central Section Valley Championship, Nov. 20.

The FC cross country team traveled to Woodward Park to participate in the CIF Central Section Valley Championship, Nov. 20.

Total of 86 schools from division one to division five compete on this most important meet of the year. Over thousand runners fighting for the top fifteen titles or top five teams for each division in order to get into CIF State Cross Country Championship.

In the boys division 5 meet, senior Soren Hoffman once again finished first for the Eagles with a time of 19:37. Finished five placed behind, sophomore Isaac Hoffman completed the meet with time 19:54. Coming in third placed, junior Michael Fu ran at time 22:13. Improved over minute from last meet, junior Glen Wang made his new personal record with time 23:38.

Despite the shin problem which kept him away from a few meets, Isaac has improved by almost two minutes on the last meet of the cross country season.

“I think I did my best,” Isaac said, “I would like to be a little faster. Obviously I always want to go faster, but I am also not disappointed.”

Running his last race with for the FC, Soren recalled what he learned from the cross country either physically or mentally.

“I think I did pretty well considering there were hills.” Soren said, “l learned a lot about pushing through to the end and training to do my best. Overall this was a good season.”

Coaching first year for FC, Doug Daniel was satisfied with the final meet at Woodward Park.

“I think they give their best and that’s all I could ask for,” Daniel said, “I think the guys work hard. They showed up to the practice everyday, they did the runs when I told them to run on their own and they did it. What a coach really wants from his runners is that they could do what he told them to do and they did that, and I am proud of them.”

Although FC cross country team didn’t make it thought the valley championship, CIF State Cross Country State Championship will be held at Woodward Park next Saturday, Nov. 29.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @fmichael_0501.

By |2014-11-24T00:00:00+00:00November 24th, 2014|Fall, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Cross country sport shorts: West Sequoia League Championship

Cross-Country-Clovis-NorthMichael Fu

he Eagles cross country team participated in the West Sequoia League Championship held by Minarets High School, Nov. 12.

The Eagles cross country team participated in the West Sequoia League Championship held by Minarets High School, Nov. 12. Six schools including FC joined this meet before the final challenge, the CIF Central Championship at Woodward Park.

Although it is the smallest meet the cross country team has ever competed in this year, runners have been working their best to finish the season with a bang.

In the boys varsity race, senior Soren Hoffman finished first for the Eagles with a time of 20:02. He was followed by sophomore Isaac Hoffman with a time of 21:23. Junior Michael Fu ran at 23:30. Lastly, Junior Glen Wang joined the team and ran 24:49 in his first meet of the season.

Hoffman who recently recovered from an injury noticed a difference between this meet and previous ones that made the WSL Championship harder than normal meets.

“I think I did my best out of all the meets I have, but the course it was a little bit difficult on the last mile.” Hoffman said, “First mile was good, pretty flat, the second mile had a little bit more of the hill, but the third mile took us out back away from the school. There are a lot of steep down hills where you have to slow down and then when you go up hill you have to speed up where it is hardest.”

Running in his first varsity meet with the team, Wang has overcome the anxiety and the hills to accomplish his first race.

“Before I ran I felt nervous, but after the meet I felt relaxed.” Wang said, “I think it is a good experience. On the last mile, there are many hills and I felt really tired when I finished. When I got to the end, it felt like I got to heaven.”

Coach Doug Daniel is grateful for all the hard work runners have put into this year. With only one week of the season left, Daniel encouraged his runners to put up their best effort for the next meet.

“I think they ran as hard as they could,” Daniel said. “It is difficult to evaluate how each runner will do with this course, but I think these guys did the best they could and I am proud of them. If they could run with a faster pace and it is possible to go to the state championship

The Eagles cross country team will next compete in the Central Section Valley Championship at the at Woodward park, Nov. 20.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @fmichael_0501.

By |2014-11-19T00:00:00+00:00November 19th, 2014|Fall, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Broadway Studios displays local cultures, backgrounds

unnamed-1Ryan King | The Feather Online Archive

The first and third Thursday of every month, ArtHop, a free event, held by the Fresno Arts Council (FAC) is presented to the community.

The first and third Thursday of every month, ArtHop, a free event, held by the Fresno Arts Council (FAC) is presented to the community.

Since 1979, a non-profit organization founded by the FAC allows local artists in Fresno to present their works and get connected with the community. Over 50 studios, galleries and museums participated in ArtHop makes this a unique and special event in Fresno.

Local artist Mimi Mott-Smith has participated in ArtHop for fifteen years, her latest exhibit Views of Fresno was presented in Broadway Studios.

“I have had a studio for ten years and I show here every month,” Mott-Smith said. “I think that people need to understand the importance of art and that we should have art and music training in schools. These are basic human activities. It is something that humans do that make us human. The fact that we make things that’s what artists are all about.”

Views of Fresno is a series of minimalist painting. Mott-Smith uses simple lines and basic color to represent her hometown. This series includes houses, schools and children playing in the yard.

“These particular paintings are different from my previous style. I wanted them to be sort of minimalist,” Mott-Smith said. “I want the focus to be on the color and the shapes because they are all about Fresno. In Fresno we have really good light. I think the flat shapes and the really precise line makes me think about good things that I love about Fresno.”

Living in L.A., artist Michelle McCreary joined this distinctive event with her friend April Alkema and experience this special culture of Fresno.

“My friend April decided to do a pop art show in this place and she wants me to be a part of it,” McCreary said. “I think it is a really neat thing to see people engaging with culture and being able to be inspire and sharing common space from all ages.”

McCreary has been doing art throughout her adult life. She finds her interest in collage and fascinated with given new life to the old objects.

“I think I do collage most of the time,” McCreary said. “I feel very inspiring to take things that had a life in some way and to re-imagine them into something else. Things like common torn out a piece of paper and make them beautiful.”

Photographer Jesse Merrell, starts his journey of ArtHop this year in May. He has been participated ArtHop ever since in the Broadway Studios.

“The ArtHop has already been established in the Broadway studio, so once I got into this space it was already set up for the event,” Merrell said. “Artist should get involved with it because it is a promotion of their work, it brings solidarity between artists and different mediums. Our work brings us back into reality and brings us back to our humanity.”

Starting not in photography, but three dimensional art, Merrell, exploring in several medium, finds photography most favorable at the moment.

“Actually my first degree was in three dimensional art so I did metal, sculpture, jewelry work,” Merrell said. “My work and my schooling in the past has always been very technical and very structure. Working in different ingredients of art has been a way for me to express a creative site to be more creative and to be able to explore more about myself.”

The upcoming ArtHop will be held from 5-8 p.m., Nov. 20, in Metropolitan & Outlying Areas. For more information check out ArtHop schedule.

For more details, check out interview of Mott-Smith on FresnoBeehive.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @fmichael_0501.

For more features, read the Nov. 12 article, Fresno salutes Coast Guard, veterans.

By |2014-11-14T00:00:00+00:00November 14th, 2014|Community Events, Features, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Cross country sport shorts: Clovis North-Saucony Twilight Invitational

CrossCountryGoldenEagleJeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

The FC cross country team participated at the Clovis North campus in the Clovis North Twilight Invitational, Oct 24.

The FC cross country team participated at the Clovis North campus in the Clovis North Twilight Invitational, Oct 24.

Unlike most of the cross country events, this meet was separated into different sections. The top two runners of each team ran in the 2 mile varsity invitational which is the hardest one to qualify in. Two more groups were created for the third and fourth placed runners.

Clovis North creates their invitationals in this manner to make it easier and to keep the chaos at bay. Along with this it makes it easier to to track the hundreds of runners participating in these events. Along with a strange way of organization, the meet was held at night creating a few problems with visbility.

Recovering from his injury, senior Soren Hoffman was kept out of the meet in order to have the best performance for the West Sequoia League championship, Nov. 12. Still traveling in China, Glen Wang, who is still traveling in China will soon join the team, Nov. 1, for the West Sequoia Championship, Nov. 12.

Running in 3rd and 4th place varsity team, junior Michael Fu and sophomore Isaac Hoffman both broke their personal records.

Junior Michael Fu finished the race with a time of 12:45. Sophomore Isaac Hoffman returned to the meet after missing a few races due to injury, despite this, he made his season record of 11:38

Holding the new title for the varsity runners in the FC cross country team, Isaac hopes he can better his pacing.

“I felt pretty good,” Isaac said. “I started out slow, yet I picked up my speed towards the end. It’s hard to balance the speed for the first and second mile. Hopefully I can be more consistent on my first mile and keep a better measure of time”

Running in the darkness, Fu found this invitational harder than the other meets.

“This is a very different race from the previous meets,” Fu said, “Our race starts at 7:40 and I finished the race without glasses. Even though the trail is well marked, it is still very difficult to find the course.”

Working on each runners pace is a difficult task, yet Coach Daniel believes that there is just a little more work to be done.

“Michael’s first mile was right on the pace, but his second mile should be faster.” Daniel said. “Isaac has improved a lot. Although he wasn’t able to practice a lot, his form is much better than he started in the season.”

The Eagles will next compete in the West Sequoia League Championship, Nov. 12.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @fmichael_0501.

By |2014-10-27T00:00:00+00:00October 27th, 2014|Fall, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Cross country sport shorts: Roughrider Invitational

Cross-Country-oliverMichael Fu

On Friday afternoon, October 17, the Eagles cross country team traveled to Woodward park for the Roughrider Invitational.

On Friday afternoon, October 17, the Eagles cross country team traveled to Woodward park for the Roughrider Invitational. The meet was separated into five sections. Small school’s, large school’s, freshmen, sophomore boys, junior boys, small school varsity, and large school varsity.

A total of 1,490 runners participated in the meet. This was because of the fact Woodward park is the course for the Central Section Valley Championship, Numerous schools arrived to compete in this meet in order to be ready for the final meet.

Recovering from his injury, runner Soren Hoffman was unable to run in the even and is working hard to get back in shape for the championships. Junior Glen Wang also was not able to run because he is currently in China reuniting with his family. Sophomore Isaac Hoffman was unable to join the meet because he is working on his mileage and also rested this meet for the championship in November.

In the 5000 meter varsity small school meet, junior Michael Fu finished the meet with a new personal record 21:24.30.

“This is an important race,” Fu said, “I was so encouraged when I saw Isaac and Soren cheering on top of the hill. They do not have to be at the meet, but they drive all the way to Woodward anyway.”

By adding core workouts to the program and hill runs into the practices, Coach Daniel was happy with the results.

“Michael did a great job.” Coach said, “He has improved two minutes in his last race, and he improved another forty seconds in this meet.”

Even though Fu has improved a lot compared to his record from the beginning of the season, Coach is looking for more potential out of him.

“His first mile was a little bit fast,” Daniel said, “Along with the first mile he ran a great final mile with a pace of 6:06. Despite the exceptional time in these two sections the second mile prove to be a problem, this mile always proves to be the hardest part and he has to push through the pain here.”

The Eagles will next compete in Clovis North-Sancony Twilight Invitational, Oct. 24.

Michael Fu, Writer contributed to this article.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @fmichael_0501.

By |2014-10-27T00:00:00+00:00October 27th, 2014|Fall, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Cross country sport shorts: Woodlake Invitational

P1030965 | The Feather Online Archive

The Eagles varsity cross country team participated in Woodlake Invitational at Lake Kaweah, Oct. 11.

The Eagles varsity cross country team participated in Woodlake Invitational at Lake Kaweah, Oct. 11.

Despite not being able to attempt the Clovis Invitational at Woodward Park, Coach Doug Daniel felt that being a part of the other meet allowed the team to practice. The course was 3.1 miles long and surrounds parts of Lake Kaweah.

While the Cross Country team is usually made up of 5 players, Michael Fu represented the team because of injuries and previous engagements. Freshman Matthew Oliver was unable to participate in this meet due to his injury. Sophomore Isaac Hoffman is working towards his academics while also recovering from previous injury. Junior Glen Wang played percussion in the Reedley Fiesta Parade. Senior Soren Hoffman was busy taking the SAT and was not able to attend the invitational.

Junior Michael Fu was the lone runner for the Eagles in the varsity race. He finished the course with a time of 21:47.3. Improving his previous record by two minutes, Fu made his fastest season record.

“I am really happy with how I improved,” Fu said. “This is the most improvement I ever made and the fastest race I ever had.”

Cross country coach Doug Daniel was pleased about the race and is looking forward to the next race at Woodward park.

“I?m glad that Michael was able to participate in all these meets.” Daniel said. “I hope others will be able to participate in more meets soon.”

The FC cross country team has been practicing in Woodward park everyday, and now they will meet their first challenge. Since the CIF State Cross Country Championships will also be held at Woodward park, the Roughrider Invitational will be a very large meet for all competing high schools.

The Eagles will next compete in Roughrider Invitational, Oct. 17.

Michael Fu, Writer, contributed to this article.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @fmichael_0501.

By |2014-10-21T00:00:00+00:00October 21st, 2014|Fall, Uncategorized|1 Comment

Alumnus Doug Daniel returns to coach, remembers past

Doug Daniels college photoJeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

First year cross country coach at FC, Doug Daniel has returned to his alma mater after graduating from Fresno Pacific University in 2013.

First year cross country coach at FC, Doug Daniel has returned to his alma mater after graduating from Fresno Pacific University in 2013.

Daniel developed a great passion for running at an early age. Holding not only one but several school records, Daniel did not only placed 6th in the Central Section Cross Country Championships (CIF) in his senior year, but also represented FC for many track and field championship meets.

“I remember as a preschooler I looked forward to running after school. I would have run forever if I could,” Daniel said. “My mom has a story of me while I was an infant. Before I could walk, I would be running in circles in my walker.”

Dedicated to his running career, Daniel first began track at FC in 2006.

“The first time I ran track, was my 8th grade year in junior high,” Daniel said. “In my final meet, there were four guys trying to block me out. I got to pass them and they got to pass me, it was a close race. They caught me by the end, but I ran a minute faster than my previous personal record and I felt okay with it.”

Back in 2006 the cross country team was first introduced to FC by, Mr. Ericlee Gilmore, who passed away in Sept. 2014. Although having a hard time adjusting to the new program, Daniel made it through his sophomore year.

“The first time I ever did cross country was when I was a sophomore in high school. Because it was the first year we had a team,” Daniel said. “It is a tough thing to say, but my first year I ran competitively in my sophomore year.”

After graduation from FPU in 2013, Daniel returned to FC to coach for the first time for the junior high and varsity cross country team. Daniels says that his dedication to FC stemmed from the memories he made there as a student.

“I love FC,” Daniel said. “Honestly, I would rather coach here than in a big school. Not that a big school wouldn’t hire me, but because I experienced a major portion of my life at Fresno Christian.”

Inspired by Ericlee Gilmore, Daniel dreamed to go back to FC.

“Cross country here was something that helped shape me and I always wanted to come back. It was kind of my dream,” Daniel said. “I always wanted to come back here and coach and work with Gilmore, but that didn’t get to happen.”

Although Daniel’s dream of coaching alongside Gilmore did not get to come true, Daniel found new motivation for him to stay in FC.

“I love the kids here and love the school,” Daniel said. “It just seemed like a good fit for me. I received so much help here and I just have to go back and give back.”

Ever since Gilmore introduced Daniel to running at 4th grade, Daniel has looked up to him.
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“I did a track camp with Gilmore while I was in 4th grade and I had a lot of fun,” Daniel said. “Coach Gilmore put the team together. He rose funding and did a great job. The best coach in the world.”

As assistant coach, Daniel makes decisions and works back and forth between the junior and varsity teams.

“I felt that as far as running goes, I know exactly what to do. I have learned a lot mostly from my coaches who have been excellent,” Daniel said after the team?s third meet at Firebaugh High school. “What really has been a challenge has been just the logistics of the sport. I do not always know how I am goanna communicate with parents or how I handle discipline issues.”

At FPU Daniel joined the cross country and track team and met another inspiring coach, Eric Schwab.

“Eric Schwab is also a great coach,” Daniel said. “Eric Schwab wasn’t a strict discipline coach, but you always knew he care about the kids and that’s what kind of motivated us because you know that the coach cared about you and you didn’t want to let him down.”

With five cross country season meets left, Daniel is working towards not only bettering the team, but also learning from the team to become a better coach.

“Honestly I love coaching more than I have ever liked competing,” Daniel said. “I want to be a coach like that where the athletes would want to work for me. Because they know that I care about them and I want them to be the best they can be.”

With FC students and multi-scholars, the FC varsity team made up just enough runners to compete as a group. Coach Daniel shows his great passion in cross country running and practicing next to runners. Daniel sets his goal for this year to not only become a better coach, but also train him for longer distance races. Daniel will participate in Two Cities Marathon and Half as well as other meets in the next year.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @fmichael_0501.

For more sports, read Oct. 17 article, Seasoned senior brings leadership, experience to team.

By |2014-10-20T00:00:00+00:00October 20th, 2014|Alumni, Athletics, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Cross country sport shorts: Eagle Fly-In Invitational

IMG_1273rAlexis Kalugin | The Feather Online Archive

The Eagles varsity cross country team competed at Firebaugh High School in Eagle Fly-in Invitational 3.1 mile course, Sept. 23.

The Eagles varsity cross country team competed at Firebaugh High School in Eagle Fly-in Invitational 3.1 mile course, Sept. 23.

The meet was smaller than the usual with only 10 schools and 47 male varsity runners participated in the race.

Senior Soren Hoffman, finished the meet with a time out of 21:07 followed by sophomore Isaac Hoffman, running first time in the 3.1 course with his personal record 21:25.

Junior Michael Fu, ran with time 24:16. He was followed by freshman Matthew Oliver, with time 25:07.

Junior Glen Wang, was not in the meet, he will participate in this first meet, Oct. 11.

Sophomore Isaac Hoffman, running 3.1 miles course first time recovered from the knee injury.

“I was happy with my race” Isaac said. “I think I did well on the first mile, the second (mile) was little less, but the last one could have been better.”

Still learning how to control race pace of the three miles course. Oliver comment on the Firebaugh Eagle Fly-In course

“It was a bad race,” Oliver said. “The first mile felt weird, it was kind of a rough start. The second mile was not good, it is getting down, and third mile I just felt slow”

Coach Doug Daniel discussed the meet after reviewed the result on the Athletic.net.

“We had a bad race, but the good news is we know what we can work on,” Daniel said. “First few week we have been working on the mileage and now the team needs to work and experience the race pace.”

The Eagles will next compete in Woodlake Invitational, Oct. 11

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @fmichael_0501.

By |2014-09-27T00:00:00+00:00September 27th, 2014|Fall, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Cross Country sport shorts: Sanger Invitational

MooreDaniel1Jeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

The Eagles’ varsity cross country team recently participated in the Sanger Invitational at Avocado Lake, Sept. 19.

The Eagles’ varsity cross country team recently participated in the Sanger Invitational at Avocado Lake, Sept. 19.

Unlike the Kingsburg meet on Sept. 6, the meet had a regular five kilometer course. Sophomore Issac Hoffman unfortunately suffered a knee injury and was kept out of the meet. Glen Wang, ’17, joined late and was unable to participate in the event.

Cross country senior co-captain, Soren Hoffman, finished the meet, and set his seasonal record of 19:09.24. He was followed by freshman Matthew Oliver, who finished the meet with a time of 22:29.61. Junior co-captain Michael Fu ran with a time of 24:09.79.

After his first time running the full meet, Oliver set his personal record and discussed his strategy for the race.

“I did good on the first mile, I kept at a good pace and it was easy to do,” Oliver said. “The second mile was a little bit harder. The track was a bit bumpier and I was tired, but it didn’t slow me down. The last mile was pretty good overall.”

Hoffman joined cross country training for triathlons, and also set his new personal best record.

“I feel like I could have gone faster on the second mile,” Hoffman said. “But other than that I felt pretty good.”

Coach Doug Daniel was pleased with hard work of the team.

“I think the guys ran hard,” Daniel said. “I think they give me their best effort. I was really grateful that they didn’t go out too fast this time. Or at the very least, they went out at the time I instructed them to.”

The Eagles will compete in the Firebaugh High School, Sept. 23.

This writer can be reached via Twitter: @fmichael_0501.

For more sports, read the Sept. 18 article, Football sport shorts: Anzar.

By |2014-09-23T00:00:00+00:00September 23rd, 2014|Fall, Uncategorized|2 Comments

Fu reflects on education controversies in Taiwan (PODCAST)

IMG_6852cJeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive

Fu reflects on the education in Taiwan

Located next to China, Japan, Korea and Philippine, Taiwan is a tiny melting pot in Asia. The education system is much more complicated in Taiwan than here is in the United States. As children born in Asian culture, they are required by their parents to have many talents. Playing piano, playing violin, drawing, learning English, and doing abacus (math) are nothing special: just what students ought to be able to do.

As students grow older, more and more homework is put onto their shoulders, Many students began to cram schoolwork in the 7th grade. Being able to get a high score becomes the only purpose of a majority of students’ lives. Going home late is a normal part of many junior high school students’ lives. Going to bed by 11 o’clock or later is normal, between ten and 11 is great, and before nine o’clock is almost impossible.

There are only two periods of P.E. classes in one week, but pupils hardly participate in them. Students wonder why they need P.E. class when only two students in the class are swimming and the rest are sitting on the benches.

9th grade is the most important year for junior high students. Students study so hard that school seems like a graveyard after the sunset. As the exam comes closer, massive amount of tests and handouts are given out by teachers and schoolwork cram can stack up higher than five feet.

In 2010, my sister Jane Fu took the last year test of the “The Basic Competence Test for Junior High School Students” in Taiwan. The following year the education system officials realized that there were too many mistakes in the scoring. The government decided to cancel the new test before the summer vacation was over. Recently, there was a student who scored nothing, but was accepted into the top three high schools in Taiwan.

(PODCAST) Student life in Taiwan Sept. 17–

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After students finish high school, another challenge is waiting for them. High admission rate almost makes college worthless. In 2008, Taiwan made the admission rate 97.1%, which allowed students to go to the college so easily that scoring 7.69 points was sufficient to go to college in Taiwan.

As the result, young people with master degrees or even doctorate degrees could not find a job. News shows up day after day saying that doctors aren’t making money at the hospital of their professions, but instead from making food at the night market.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @fmichael_0501.

For more features, read the Sept. 11 article, New coach brings excitement, energy to PE.

By |2014-09-16T00:00:00+00:00September 16th, 2014|Academics, Opinions, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Cross country sport shorts: Kingsburg Two-Mile Race

P1020475_FotorRyan King | The Feather Online Archive

The Eagles’ varsity cross country team traveled to the Kingsburg High School, Sept. 6.

The Eagles’ varsity cross country team traveled to the Kingsburg High School, Sept. 6.

The meet was separated into four sections: Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, and Senior. Instead of the typical three miles or five kilometers, the course was two miles. Lead by the new cross country coach, Doug Daniel, a brand new cross country season had just begun.

Freshman Matthew Oliver completed his first cross country meet and placed 60th, creating his personal record of 14:03.36.

Multi-schooled senior Soren Hoffman and sophomore Isaac Hoffman also completed their first meet of the cross country season. Senior Soren finished the course with a placement of 50th and a time of 11:52.11. Sophomore Isaac ran with 81 sophomores and placed 33th, with a finishing time of 12:01.03.

Junior Michael Fu ran with seniors and placed 84th with a time of 14:16.32.

Since the season just started, lots of improvements could be made. Oliver, who is new to cross country, was satisfied with his results, and is prepared to improve.

“I am really happy with how the meet went,” Oliver said. “With a lot of time and practice, I can improve my skills and boost my endurance.”

Senior Soren says that while he is content with the results of the match, he felt his did not perform to the best of his abilities. He is planning to work on his pacing for the future.

“I think I could improve my pace,” Soren said. “I think I started too fast and, in turn, did not finish the race as strongly as I could have.”

As a first-year coach for FC, Daniel congratulated his team on their effort. He later reported that he is very proud of his team’s performance.

We just did incredible today,” Daniel said. “I am extremely happy. Michael and Matthew each broke their times by two minutes. Soren broke his time by fourteen seconds, but he had the toughest time, and Isaac broke his time about a minute. I am proud of these kids.”

The Eagles run at Avocado Lake in the Sanger Invitational, Sept. 19.

Follow The Feather via Twitter @thefeather, Instagram @thefeatheronline and Facebook @thefeatheronline. This writer can be reached via Twitter: @fmichael_0501.

For more sports, read the Sept. 8 article, Volleyball sport shorts: Paramount.

By |2014-09-11T00:00:00+00:00September 11th, 2014|Fall, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Junior discusses origins, customs of Chinese New Year

ChineseLuckyMoneySmJeremy Brown | The Feather Online Archive
As Chinese New Year approaches, I want to share something about Chinese culture with my friends after spending my first semester adapting to the new environment and breaking through various difficulties. We use the lunar calendar to count the date of traditional holidays in China, so the exact date of Spring Festival varies from year to year, and this year’s Spring Festival is Jan. 31.

According Chinese zodiac, this year will be the year of horse.

In Chinese, we call the Chinese New Year “Chun Jie”, which literally means Spring Festival. Actually, Spring Festival was a totally different holiday before the Revolution of 1911, which was marked as the starting point of modern China.

After, the introduction of the Gregorian calendar, Chinese government changed the name of Chinese New Year into Spring Festival so that people will not get confused by the two New Years in two calendars.

Spring Festival is the most important holiday for the Chinese. In fact, Chinese people value Spring Festival as much as how westerners value Christmas. Even in some prisons, prisoners, guards and the warden celebrate Spring Festival together.

In today’s China, we have eight days of vacation for Spring Festival (including the New Years’ Eve) in which the first four are designated by law.

Traditional Chinese culture emphasizes reunion of the families, so people tend to rush back home during Spring Festival no matter what they do and where they are.

In Chinese main land, we even have a special concept called “Spring Rush”, which is a situation similar to, but way more severe than what happens here in America before Thanksgiving. People start to order bus, train or plane tickets a month earlier than the holiday and people start to actually travel one to three weeks before the holiday.

Take my family as an example. I live with my parents and my father’s parents in Beijing while my mother?s parents live in a city 150 miles away. So we usually spend the New Years? Eve (Chu Xi) and the first few days of the New Year with my father’s parents, visit some relatives, and then spend a couple of days with my mother’s parents and the other relatives.

To most of Chinese people, Chu Xi is the most important day. In Chu Xi, one of the most important events for us is sitting by the table with a big family and enjoying a big dinner prepared by the whole family, although some people are getting lazy and started to eat in the restaurants.

During the afternoon of Chu Xi, My whole family of eight would gather together and prepare the dinner. In some years, I was even the ‘head chef’ with grandma giving me advices. There are a lot of traditional dishes that have to appear on the dinner table at that night. The specific dishes depend on different regions, cultures and personal preferences. Here are some “necessities” for our family.

The seedling of green bean or soybean is the sign of good luck because they look like a traditional Chinese symbol called Ru Yi, which means “as you wish.” And the stir frying canola is usually served with the seedling because it looks like another ancient symbol that represents happiness. It?s called “An Le.”

Fish is also required, because in Chinese, the word “fish” and the word “surplus” sounds the same, so eating fish indicates our wish of getting more than we need in the next year. In addition, we are not supposed to finish the fish because of the wish of “surplus.”

Lastly, the most important Spring Festival food in the entire northern China is called “Jiao Zi,” or dumplings. We make hundreds of them for the big dinner. Besides the usual stuffing, we make a few of them with sweet red bean paste and coins, and we wish the people who happen to eat them will have good luck for the next year. And that’s why my cousins and I tried so hard to find the “luck” by looking for the slight difference on the surface of dumplings.

Firework is another necessity for Spring Festival and it’s also my favorite since I was a kid. Strangely, I especially like those cheap firecrackers instead of those expensive, ginormous and fancy fireworks for display. It’s because there are so many ways to play firecrackers but after you lit a firework, all you can do is watch. And, the person who lights up the firework always has the worst view. No exceptions.

For adults, there is a tradition of giving kids lucky money, which is the major source of income for me in the whole year.

There are too many interesting traditions about Spring Festival that I swear I can write a whole book about it just base on my own experience and the stories from my parents and grandparents. But what I can write in the article is limited.

So, if you have interest in Spring Festival, you are welcomed to ask your Chinese friends as well as your Korean friends and Vietnamese friends as they celebrate that holiday in their country, too.

And, this year’s Spring Festival experience is going to be a little bit different for me as I am six thousand miles away from home. But, fortunately, my Chinese Church is organizing a celebration on February. 8. Also, I will celebrate Chu Xi with my fellow international student Tom and his mother after the basketball game on Friday.

In addition, I encourage readers to attend the Chinese New Year Parade and Festival in downtown Fresno on March 1, starting at 10 a.m.

For more opinions, read the Jan. 23 article, La Historia de un Viajero.

By |2014-01-28T00:00:00+00:00January 28th, 2014|Opinions, Uncategorized|0 Comments

COLUMN: Band performance highlights Chinese New Year (VIDEO)

Fresno Christian High School received an invitation to participate in the 13th annual Chinatown Revitalization Parade back in December. According to director Michael Ogdon, he didn’t even know there was such a thing. As it was, Ogdon let the invite sit on the “in-pile” for a couple weeks before asking junior drum major Eric Cowin his opinion of marching in another parade.

“Well, we only got to do two parades this year, so maybe it’s a good idea,” Cowin said. So, the campus band drove to Fresno’s historic downtown and marched in the 30-minute parade as the first high school band to do so in its history. The following is director Ogdon’s account of the event.

FCBandNearPoverello3SmFeather staff

The Eagle band performed for the 13th annual Chinatown Revitalization Parade, March 2. They then continued to march and play for Shantytown spectators as well.

13th annual Chinatown Revitalization Parade

In much the same feel as the town of Biola’s “56th annual Raisin Day Parade,” Oct. 20, the small town attitude of this gathering was during Chinese New Year from the beginning.

With a start time slated for 12 noon, the band was plenty early in its caravan of parent’s vehicles, weaving around street blockades to the participant parking between the Mexican Baptist Church and a mortuary/crematorium., March 2. Fitting, too, in that this is the Chinese Year of the Snake.

With nearly two hours to wait prior to the parade’s step off time, the band of 8, drum line of 9 and flag team of six walked a block north to the local Rally’s drive through for a snack and shade. Oh, the advantages of having a small group!

Finally assembled and ready to go, the parade participants certainly were a varied crew. Two chinese dance troupes, John Cho’s Kung Fu School’s Lion Dancers (VIDEO) and the Chinese Consolated Benevolent Association’s Chinese Youth Group Dragon Dancers were the most appropriate ensembles to perform, followed by the Wong Family Benevolent Association. After that, a rather odd conglomerate of Scottish bagpipers, Oakland Raider fans, a Chaffee Zoo van, a pirate float and the Dusty Buns jeep. All came in the hope of revitalizing Chinatown.

Fresno’s Chinatown certainly is in need of rebuilding. There isn’t much of what used to be a thriving subculture within our Fresno City boundaries. Perhaps the parade will bring attention and support to this deserving community. — Junior Michael Fu

Honestly, there wasn’t an overwhelming crowd along the parade route, and only about 20 percent of those watching were Chinese. Fresno Chinatown‘s proximity to the homeless shanty town a few blocks south spiced up the audience with some rugged street people. A considerable police presence was seen on bikes and in cruisers. The fire academy contributed to the action sending a vintage truck along with it’s classic siren and horn adding to the Chinese drummers.

It must be said, though, that even if the crowd was not very deep, they made up for it with their obvious appreciation for each parade participant. Lots of video cameras caught the action. Plenty of still photos were taken, too.

And just as quick as the three block parade was marched, it was over. Sure, the band still had to march back to their parked cars, and they made the most of it with drum cadence and another rendering of their parade music, “Grand Entry Swing March,” by David Baskerville (1956).

A quick packing of the instruments brought the band, drum line and flag girls to a parade of their own making. Ogdon’s thought was to offer the band a service project to the homeless. Why not? Everybody was already dressed and ready to play!

There were not many who quite knew what to make of the uniformed ensemble as they took over the street just outside the Poverello House. A loud whistle from Cowin and the band was off to the drum line’s cadence, flag team supporting in unison from the back.

Half a block down and a quick right turn brought the Eagle Band to a street full of cardboard and plywood lean-to houses built on the sidewalks. The loudest support came from the women inside the protective gates of the Poverello House as the band came into the compound. A U-turn and back out to the cars and the parade was completed.

Fresno’s Chinatown certainly is in need of rebuilding. There isn’t much of what used to be a thriving subculture within our Fresno City boundaries. Perhaps the parade will bring attention and support to this deserving community.

But the rebuilding of the lives of the homeless is not to be ignored. Who more than these need the hope that a bit of band music might bring? The tragic life circumstances trapped inside the cardboard walls of the shanty cries out for the Hope that a Savior can bring, a hope that a band can play, a flag can wave to, and a drum can pound out.

For more opinions, read the Feb. 28 article, Disneyland brings relief to junior (VIDEO, PODCAST).

By |2013-03-05T00:00:00+00:00March 5th, 2013|Column, Community Events, Uncategorized, Videos|0 Comments